Turkuaz, The Breakfast & More Featured On Initial Wild Woods Lineup

first_imgThis summer, the Wild Woods Music and Arts Festival will get down with some of the best and brightest of the scene, as the festival returns to Croydon, NH from July 29-31. Wild Woods has put together a fun lineup for their annual event, with Turkuaz featured at the top of the billing. Govinda, The Breakfast (x3), and Freddy Todd are all featured on the initial listing.The full lineup includes After Funk, Dwajhay, Moses, Mister F, Of The Trees, People Like You, Stop Tito Collective, Strange Machines, The Kenny Brothers Band, Thunder Body, and VII. Check it out below, and head to the fest’s website for more information.last_img

Bouygues Telecom Orange is moving towards finalisi

first_imgBouygues TelecomOrange is moving towards finalising its deal to acquire rival French multi-play operator Bouygues Telecom, with a possibility that an announcement could be made tomorrow, timed to coincide with its quarterly financials, according to French press reports.According to reports, discussions have been held up primarily by the need to strike a deal acceptable to the regulator, meaning that some assets must be divested to rival players SFR and Free, and by the number of shares in Orange to be held by Bouygues after the acquisition is complete.According to a report in Le Figaro, Orange is likely to take over only two million of Bouygues Telecom’s customers, while Free is likely to pay about €3 billion to €3.5 billion to secure a proportion of Bouygues’ mobile subscribers along with  part of the customer base of its Bbox internet and TV service, its network and points-of-sale. SFR meanwhile is likely to acquire now-cost mobile operation B&You and part of the BBox base for about €2.5 billion.According to the reports, Bouygues Telecom is likely to end up with a stake in Orange in the order of 10%, less than previously envisaged because the French state is unwilling to see its stake fall below 20%.While Orange CEO Stéphane Richard has said that consolidation is not intended to result in an increase in prices, consumer association the UFC has expressed concern that a redistribution of Bouygues’ customers base could remove the urgency for operators to compete for new customers, leading to less price competition.last_img read more

Study Perivascular spaces contribute to worse cognitive health in older adults

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 22 2019Seemingly harmless fluid-filled spaces around the cerebral small vessels, commonly seen on brain MRIs in older adults, are now thought to be associated with more compromised cognitive skills, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published in Neurology.The new findings challenge longstanding beliefs that these areas – known as perivascular spaces – are a harmless imaging marker.When compared with common markers of small vessel disease, the study results showed a more frequent association between enlarged perivascular spaces and cognition than expected, according to senior author Angela Jefferson, PhD, professor of Neurology and director of the Vanderbilt Memory & Alzheimer’s Center.”Our work shows perivascular spaces are not clinically benign,” Jefferson said. “These areas contributed to worse cognitive health in a way that was distinct from the other markers of small vessel disease. That result was unexpected and emphasizes that enlarged perivascular spaces deserve further study.”Related StoriesHealthy lifestyle lowers dementia risk despite genetic predispositionPosterior parietal cortex plays crucial role in making decisions, research showsNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injuryThe study, which looked at older adults who have not yet developed dementia, offers evidence that multiple neuroimaging markers of small vessel disease reflect distinct pathways of injury as well as early or late features of severity.Cerebrovascular changes, including small vessel disease, are common in aging and contribute to unhealthy memory loss and dementia. Over 80 percent of all autopsy-confirmed cases of dementia are linked to cerebrovascular disease.The Vanderbilt study was designed to better understand how several markers of small vessel disease connect to cognition and what these changes mean for older adults when detected on brain scans.Study authors looked at whether each of the imaging markers related to cognitive activities, such as language, memory, visuospatial skills, information processing speed and executive functioning, and whether each of the imaging markers reflected a common or unique pathway of injury.Researchers focused on well-studied markers of small vessel disease, including white matter hyperintensities, infarcts and microbleeds, as well as enlarged perivascular spaces, which have received less attention in literature.The most frequent associations in the study linked white matter hyperintensities and cognition, including language, information processing speed, executive functioning and visuospatial skills.Unexpectedly, for the researchers, the next most frequent links were between enlarged perivascular spaces and information processing speed and executive functioning.”These results are important for any clinician or scientist who works in aging,” Jefferson said. “Many of these small vessel disease markers are due to common vascular risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as high blood pressure or diabetes. We know these conditions can be prevented and treated, which means small vessel disease and its impact on abnormal cognitive changes can also be prevented.”Source: https://ww2.mc.vanderbilt.edu/last_img read more

Google case set to examine if EU data rules extend globally

first_imgIn this April 17, 2007, file photo exhibitors of the Google company work in front of a illuminated sign at the industrial fair Hannover Messe in Hannover, Germany. Google is taking its legal fight against an order requiring it to extend “right to be forgotten” rules to its search engines globally to Europe’s top court. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer, File) Google is going to Europe’s top court in its legal fight against an order requiring it to extend “right to be forgotten” rules to its search engines globally. Google invokes free speech in French fine appeal The technology giant is set for a showdown at the European Union Court of Justice in Luxembourg on Tuesday with France’s data privacy regulator over an order to remove search results worldwide upon request.The dispute pits data privacy concerns against the public’s right to know, while also raising thorny questions about how to enforce differing legal jurisdictions when it comes to the borderless internet.The two sides will be seeking clarification on a 2015 decision by the French regulator requiring Google to remove results for all its search engines on request, and not just on European country sites like google.fr.Google declined to comment ahead of the hearing. Its general counsel, Kent Walker, said in a blog post in November that complying with the order “would encourage other countries, including less democratic regimes, to try to impose their values on citizens in the rest of the world.””These cases represent a serious assault on the public’s right to access lawful information,” he added.In an unusual move, the court has allowed a collection of press freedom, free speech and civil rights groups to submit their opinions on the case. These groups agree with Google that forcing internet companies to remove website links threatens access to information and could pave the way for censorship by more authoritarian regimes such as China, Russia and Saudi Arabia.The court’s ruling is expected within months. It will be preceded by an opinion from the court’s advocate general.The case stems from a landmark 2014 Court of Justice ruling that people have the right to control what appears when their name is searched online. That decision forced Google to delete links to outdated or embarrassing personal information that popped up in searches of their names.Authorities are now starting to worry about the risk that internet users can easily turn to proxy servers and virtual private networks to spoof their location, allowing them to dig up the blocked search results.Google said in its most recent transparency report that it has received requests to delete about 2.74 million web links since the ruling, and has deleted about 44 percent of them.Not all requests are waved through. In a related case that will also be heard Tuesday, the EU court will be asked to weigh in on a request by four people in France who want their search results to be purged of any information about their political beliefs and criminal records, without taking into account public interest. Google had rejected their request, which was ultimately referred to the ECJ. Explore furthercenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Citation: Google case set to examine if EU data rules extend globally (2018, September 10) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-09-google-case-eu-globally.htmllast_img read more

Huntsman Spider Devours Possum in Viral and Terrifying Photos

first_img In Photos: The Amazing Arachnids of the World In Australia — where else? — a large spider recently demonstrated the dominance of arachnids over puny mammals, as it chowed down on an unfortunate pygmy possum. Southern Tasmania resident Justine Latton shared her husband’s photos of the gruesome meal on June 14 in the Facebook group Tasmanian Insects and Spiders. He captured the images at a lodge in Tasmania’s Mount Field National Park while doing light repair work, Latton said yesterday (June 18) on the radio program “Tasmania Talks.” Members of the Facebook group identified the arachnid as a huntsman (also known as a giant crab spider); these large, long-legged spiders in the Sparassidae family live all over Australia. In the photo, the huntsman hangs head-down from a door hinge and grips its prey by the neck. The dead marsupial — which appears to be a pygmy possum, according to commenters — dangles limply from the huntsman’s mandibles. [In Photos: A Tarantula-Eat-Snake World]Advertisement The animal commonly known as a possum in North America (actually an “opossum,” which belongs to a different order) can grow to be as big as a cat; were that the case here, the spider would easily be the size of a large dinner plate. But pygmy possums (Cercartetus lepidus) are the smallest possums in the world, measuring about 2 to 3 inches (5 to 7 centimeters) long and weighing about 0.2 ounces (7 grams), according to Tasmania’s Parks and Wildlife Service. On average, a huntsman spider’s leg span can reach up to 6 inches (15 cm), while their bodies measure about 0.7 inches (2 cm) long, the Australian Museum reported. Eight-eyed huntsman spiders in the Sparassidae family deliver venomous bites with their sharp fangs, paralyzing small prey. Credit: Courtesy of Justine Latton Goliath Birdeater: Images of a Colossal Spider Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoLivestlyThe List Of Dog Breeds To Avoid At All CostsLivestlyUndoThe Legacy ReportMan Who Called NVIDIA Rise Makes New 5G PredictionThe Legacy ReportUndo In Photos: Tarantulas Strut Their Stuff Latton’s husband was conducting repair work at the lodge when he noticed the spider lurking on the door just above his co-worker’s head, Latton told “Tasmania Talks.” The two captured the spider in an empty ice-cream container and released the huntsman outside the lodge; the arachnid skedaddled and left its possum meal behind, Latton said. Huntsman spiders are ambush predators, and they use their large and powerful fangs to deliver venomous bites. Spiders are commonly thought to suck the liquids from their prey; in reality, they vomit digestive fluid onto their meals, chew the saturated flesh and then slurp up the dissolved nutrients, Rod Crawford, curatorial associate of arachnids at the Burke Museum in Seattle, wrote on the museum website. Huntsman spiders’ usual prey includes many types of insects, reptiles and even other spiders. But it shouldn’t come as a surprise that small mammals are also occasionally on the menu. Numerous spider species worldwide are known to eat bats, and researchers recently recorded the first evidence of tropical spiders preying on mouse opossums, in the Peruvian Amazon, Live Science previously reported. Amazon Spiders Hunt Frogs, Fish, Lizards…And MammalsFor small animals in the tropics, spiders and their arthropod cousins are responsible for “a surprising amount of death,” scientists say.Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65746-possum-eating-spider-australia.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0001:0601:06Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball00:29Video – Giggly Robot02:31Surgical Robotics关闭 last_img read more