Executive Director London Defends Parking Requirements Of Area Planning Commission

first_imgCouncilman Weaver,The Site Review Committee met with the owner/developer in March of 2018 that our office had set up to help introduce the project, the ownership team, and the agencies that were involved in the permitting process.  At that time, the owner described the project and what their proposed uses were for the building.  Based on the information received, each agency laid out what items would be expected to be presented at the Site Review meeting for approval.  In addition, some of the main items discussed where the parking requirements, variances that could be requested, sewer/water/grease trap items, redevelopment approval, etc.All agencies involved in the process were there to help this project through the necessary requirements along with providing detailed information from each agency.  On October 29, 2018, 7 months later, the first set of plans were submitted for review by the Site Review Committee, i.e. Phase 1 of the project.  During a walkthrough by the Building Commission, Fire Department, and the Area Plan Commission, it was discovered that the owner had already done some extensive work without having any permits.  Even though this activity had happened, the Site Review Committee moved forward to try and keep this project on track.On November 7, 2018, an Improvement Location Permit was issued for the project so that it could continue to move forward.  At that time, several items were discussed with the owner including parking requirements for future Phases along with items required by the Evansville Water & Sewer Utility since the facility did not have easements for the sanitary sewer system.  Since that time multiple sets of plans along with multiple different scenarios have been presented to the agencies that sit on Site Review.On February 25, 2019, Phase 2 of the project was submitted for Site Review Approval.  During the time between Phase 1 and Phase 2, a variance request was approved for parking on the project which would relax the number of required parking spaces from 122 to 86, which allowed for additional units to go in along with 4 hotel units and office space.  Based on the plans that were provided, which showed an additional parking lot to be built to meet the variance approval, a permit was issued on February 28, 2019.  The existing parking lot that is currently in place has a total of 71 parking spaces.Based on the variance that the owner requested and showed on the plan that was provided and approved by the BZA and the Site Review Committee, the additional parking lot would provide the 86 spaces required.  To date, that parking lot has yet to be built and has been shown on several different locations on the site. In addition, the shared parking agreement with Culver school that was recommended by the City government to help the owner in their future plans has yet to be provided for approval.  By no means has any agency tried to slow this project down, and in fact, each agency has tried to help nail down a moving target.To date, the Area Plan Commission has approved each request for a Certificate of Occupancy after the proper information has been submitted.  If you would like to discuss this project in more detail, I would be happy to meet and pull all the information on the project along with the multiple sets of plans that we have had to work with.Additionally, since I have become the Area Plan Commission Director, the parking requirements in the downtown business district have been eliminated for all commercial developments and the residential component has been greatly reduced by the addition of the ability to share parking or to be within 300’ feet of a public parking area.  The Arts Overlay Zone, Jacobsville Overlay Zone, and West Franklin Street Overlay Zones have been created, have helped reduce parking requirements and have been completed through a properly vetted process by the entire community.  Pushed for the last several years, we have finally received funds this year by the County and City Councils to hire a consultant to update our antiquated codes.  I could not agree more that this review has needed to occur.  We look forward to working with everyone through this process, which should include our entire community since it will affect everyone!Thank You,Ronald S. London, P.E., CFM– Executive DirectorFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Collect-a-Book sparks children’s love of reading

first_imgPresent to add a bit of colour and energy to the visits was the Collect-a-Can mascot, the CANman, who had boxes of reading books in tow for the schools to add to their libraries in exchange for the cans the pupils and school staff had collected for recycling. (Images: Collect-a-Can SA)Together with partners and stakeholders, Collect-a-Can’s (a can recovery and recycling organisation), Collect-a-Book initiative has managed to collect approximately 3000 books that they hope will help foster a love of reading literature among the five underprivileged schools they had identified to receive these books.About 3 000 books were donated by Collect-a-Book to five underprivileged schools, in the hopes they would spark a love of reading in the children.Collect-a-Book is an offshoot of Collect-a-Can, the well-known can recovery and recycling organisation. A number of partners joined the initiative, which was Collect-a-Can’s effort to mark Mandela Month this year. It tied into Nelson Mandela’s love of reading and his belief in the role the youth had to play in transforming South Africa as a whole.The books were handed over to the schools on 23 and 24 July; on the days, the pupils were treated to fun-filled interactive reading with volunteers and staff, who were on hand to help make it a time to remember.Zimasa Velaphi, Collect-a-Can’s public relations and marketing manager, said the aim of Collect-a-Book was to put books in the hands of underprivileged pupils and “bring reading books to life, while making a lasting and memorable difference in schools”.Groups of volunteers and partners, along with a number of staff members from Collect-a-Can, made their first stop at Zitha Primary School in Vanderbijlpark, in Gauteng on Thursday. Visits to the four other schools were on Friday. They were: Chuma Primary School in Khayelitsha, Cape Town; Khalipha Primary School in Umlazi, Durban; Boepakitso Primary School in Diepkloof, Johannesburg; and Bokamoso Primary School in Soshanguve, Tshwane.Present to add a bit of colour and energy to the visits was the Collect-a-Can mascot, the CANman, who had boxes of reading books in tow for the schools to add to their libraries in exchange for the cans the pupils and school staff had collected for recycling.Selected classes at the schools were treated to what the facilitators of the initiative called “READalicious” activities. These involved teaching the children the many benefits of reading through interactive exercises and group reading sessions. They showed that reading could be fun, and could be considered more than just a part of the school curriculum.The activities were designed to prove to the children that reading could help to unlock the imagination and widen their scope of reference.Velaphi explained that the importance of reading for pleasure could not be underestimated. A study on children and reading “showed that reading for pleasure positively influences children’s learning abilities, especially with regards to developing their vocabulary, spelling abilities and mathematics skills”.It was important, she added, for Collect-a-Can to ensure this was not a once-off event. “Schools can look forward to a follow-up visit for International Literacy Day on Tuesday, 8 September 2015, when we hope to find that these learners have fallen in love with reading for pleasure.”The many partners who played a part in the success of the initiative included ReaderLympics, Biblionef, Molteno, Pan Macmillan, Dainfern Valley Estate and Tshikovha Environmental and Communication Consultancy.“Nothing encapsulates the spirit of Mandela Month more than working together to make a positive difference in our underprivileged communities,” Velaphi concluded.For more information about Collect-a-Can, visit its website or telephone on 011 466 2939.last_img read more

Conferences for small farmers coming up

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Two conferences designed for small-farm owners will be held in Wilmington and Massillon, Ohio in March. Ohio State University Extension’s Small Farm Program is hosting the Opening Doors to Success and Living Your Small Farm Dream conferences to help small-farm owners get the maximum potential out of their businesses.“Across Ohio, there is an increasing number of residents who are purchasing small acreages,” said Tony Nye, an OSU Extension educator who coordinates the Small Farm Program. “Conferences such as these help provide landowners necessary information to help grow their small farm business.”The two conferences, each with a trade show, are designed to help participants learn tips, techniques and methods for diversifying their operations to improve economic growth and development on their farms, Nye said.Researchers and educators with OSU Extension and the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, as well as industry experts, will conduct the conference sessions.The Opening Doors to Success conference is March 10-11 at Wilmington College, 1870 Quaker Way in Wilmington. The March 10 session is from 1-5:30 p.m. with a workshop on Poultry Production, held at the Wilmington College Academic Farm, 1590 Fife Ave., in Wilmington; and a workshop on Beekeeping for the Beginner, held at the Wilmington College Kelly Center on College Street in Wilmington.The March 11 session is from 7:45 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. at the Center for Science and Agriculture, 340 College Street, in Wilmington. Topics for the day will include applying chemicals, greenhouse production, livestock, field crops, finances, and farm and land access.Registration for the Opening Doors to Success conference is $20 for Friday, $60 for Saturday only, or $70 for Friday and Saturday. Register at go.osu.edu/BpkQ by March 3. Students are offered a discounted rate.The Living the Small Farm Dream conference is March 25 at the R.G. Drage Career Technical Center, 2800 Richville Drive Southwest, in Massillon, from 8 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. The event will include 27 workshop sessions on topics including disease prevention, aquaculture, land management, finances, solar energy, pond management and using urban land for garden markets.Registration for the Living the Small Farm Dream conference is $60, or $30 for students. Register at agnr.osu.edu/small-farm-programs by March 17.For more information about either conference, contact Nye at 937-382-0901 or [email protected] conferences are an outgrowth of the Ohio New and Small Farm College, an eight-week program created by OSU Extension that offers an introduction to the business of small farming for those who are new to the industry. The program offers information on budgeting, business planning and developing a farm structure, among other issues.Additionally, on March 24 from 9 a.m. to 3:45 p.m., also at the R.G. Drage center, a Women in Agriculture conference will take place. Participants can register for this and the Living the Small Farm Dream conference at a reduced rate if attending both. For more information, visit regonline.com/womeninageast. The registration deadline for the Women in Agriculture Conference is March 10.last_img read more

From Designed to Built: Delivering Your Green Home

first_imgOFFICIAL TRANSCRIPTChris Briley: Hey everybody, welcome to the Green Architects’ Lounge podcast. I’m your host, Chris Briley.Phil Kaplan: And I’m your host, Phil Kaplan. How’re you doing, Chris?Chris: I’m doing absolutely great, Phil. Yourself?Phil: Excellent! I’m doing great. I noticed it was nice and chilly for the first time last night. Did you see frost?Chris: I don’t know if I saw frost, but dude, I felt it. I woke up and took the kids out to the bus and went “Whoa!” Went out in a T-shirt and was like “This bus better hurry up!”Phil: Welcome to fall. It’s all downhill from here.Chris: So they say. Fall season brings what?Phil: It brings apples — Am I right?Chris: Let’s go right to the cocktails. Not only is it fall, but we got the news that Steve Jobs passed away. Our cocktail is in honor of Steve Jobs and also fall. It’s called the Northern Spy.Phil: Man, it’s hot.[The guys share the recipe.]Phil: It’s getting a little chillier. Aren’t we glad we live in warm homes, Chris?Chris: Yes, we are. Energy-efficient one.Phil: And we’re glad we’re building them and designing them…Chris: That’s right. The title of this podcast says that we’ve designed you a great house; now we have to make it a reality. There’s the challenge of bringing in a builder, controlling the budget and schedule, and making this thing happen. Not the easiest thing in the world to do…Phil: And then there’s the inconvenience of having a client involved… I mean, someone’s gotta pay for it. No, really, we love our clients — especially when we have a great team. Spectacular things happen — intense joy and creation. One of the things we can talk about is what defines success.Chris: So, what’s a successful project?Phil: The number one thing is a happy client. If the client is happy and they’re going to recommend you after the fact, and they’re going to live in this house…Chris: You’ll sleep at night if you know the client is happy.Phil: It also helps if the architect is happy and likes the design.Chris: If it’s one you’re passionate about and excited to show your friends, then that is special.Phil: Things come together, and the client shares your goals and believes in your vision. It also helps if you make a little money on it. And the builder has to have great satisfaction — he’s out there all the time. He also has to make money on it.Chris: And be proud of what he’s done. The ultimate successful project, then, is happy client, happy architect, happy builder.Phil: We can get there. It’s been done. Does it happen most of the time? I’d say not. We’re in a tricky profession. We’re here to try to resolve some of these issues. And in Part 2, we’ll talk directly with some builders to figure out what we need to do to come together as teams and make it work better.Chris: Clients want to understand the process. Lots of times they come to us and say they’ve never hired an architect before. And they’ve never built anything before, never hired a builder before. Part of the architect’s job is to demystify the process. It’s not a magical thing that happens behind some green curtain. There are real, tangible people involved who care about the whole process.Phil: It’s true. They come to us because we’re good at what we do. We see things in a different way because that’s how we’re trained. But, my little tangent is this: I personally think architects have a PR problem. People think our egos and their dreams are going to be exceeded and cost them a lot of money, and they’re not going to be in control of the process. That’s sad. Our goal is to be a trusted advisor.Chris: As architects, we’re a different profession than we were 20 years ago.Phil: Absolutely. The idea of a master builder is nice, but we need a team to do all these things.Chris: So, let’s talk about that. The team member we’re going to talk about most right now is the builder. In the old days, Phil, you’d hire this master builder/architect who’d draw your plans, write your specs, hand them to you, and say, “This is the house you want.” And you’d take all that to every builder in town to get their budgets, and then you’d pick one. It’s called “going out to bid.”And commercially that still happens; the stakes are higher and you need that level of control. But with a house, the problem with that is the client is going to be paying the architect to protect them. If you have a good builder who’s on board and part of the team, though, you don’t need protection. The times have changed.Phil: Especially when we talk about sustainable homes.Chris: Speaking of green, I’d like to not introduce Dan Morrison. He was going to travel here.Phil: Dan is the executive editor of Fine Homebuilding and GreenBuildingAdvisor. We are very excited to almost have had him as a guest.Now that we’re doing these green homes…Chris: They take a higher level of focus, and not just from the builder. It’s even more important that the builder gets this stuff right. So choose the builder ahead of time.Phil: In integrated design, we get the builder on board early rather than go out to bid. We need a team to make the sure the details we’re drawing are going to be built properly. And also, it’s a check for us. We’re architects; we don’t swing hammers. If we’re not careful and screw this stuff up, it’s a huge risk for green building in general.I’ll tell you how we bring a builder in. Typically, there’s a schematic design, and then there is design development when pricing is set. It’s certainly before construction drawings; we don’t go out to bid. We advocate getting the drawings done to a certain level to get the builder to set a price within 10 to 15 percent. We just ask for an estimate. Then we ask the client to hire that builder, and then we form a team.We’ve had issues with bringing builders in really early in the process, having to do with cost control. They offer an estimate based on sketches; they’re hired, and then we do the construction drawings. The building costs then go way out of control.Chris: Clients listening to this say, “That’s other people, not me.” Well, it is you. It would be me, if I were building my house. There’s a compulsion for everyone to hear what they want to hear. Let’s say the builder quotes a house between $250,000 and $400,000. That’s a massive range; if they quote you that, it practically means nothing. The client walks away thinking, “All right, if we do everything the architect says, we’ll be at the low end of that range.”Phil: If we bring builders on too early, the client thinks they’ve lost the competitive advantage. They have a little bit of regret.Chris: So, what do you do? On a recent project, in the design development phase, we hired two builders and paid them to come up with a ballpark price, within 15 percent. We got plans, elevations and a good wall section for a real complicated project, but we had to make allowances. We got two prices back, but you’re not choosing based just on numbers, but on a relationship. We hired one of the builders and said “sorry” to the other one, but at least they got paid a little.We’re afraid of builders offering up numbers too soon that are not based on enough information — we need plans, elevations, a good wall section, maybe schedules.Phil: Sometimes we push it to structural information — framing plans — to get more accurate bidding. In Part 2, we’ll talk to a few prominent builders to get their point of view.Chris: And we’ll make fun of them.Phil: It’ll be really interesting to see what kind of alignment there is between our thoughts and their thoughts. If we’re not completely aligned, then we need to work on that.Chris: It’s all about managing expectations. It’s all about being clear with the client and the builder.Phil: We can’t reiterate enough about clarity at the outset for program and scope, schedule, and budget. Have them written down somewhere. Be honest every step along the way.Chris: It’s like the key to a successful marriage — communication. Of course, really, it’s sex and money. Which is not the same with building and design; I’ve not had that project yet.Let’s leave it here. In Part 2, we’ll play “Three Questions” with the builders.Sheila, let’s bring in Jesse to play “What’s Bothering Jesse Thompson?” With us now is architect Jesse Thompson.Jesse Thompson: Why do we spend so much time talking about walls? With each other, with clients, with builders, probably code officials.… Yeah, there are more walls than roof in a house. Maybe they are important.Phil: I get it. When you’re talking to a colleague about a house, they say “It’s got R-40 walls.” We always begin with the walls. What did you get in the walls? I’ll judge you from there.Jesse: In Passivhaus consultant training, we talk about moisture profiles in walls. We get clients with detailed lists of technical aspects they want in their buildings. Well, let’s go back and talk about the house first, then about what’s the right thing to do. We get clients who are as quality obsessed about the guts of their building as they are about …Phil: It’s a paradigm shift.Jesse: Well, they’re coming fast. They sit up all night reading GreenBuildingAdvisor before they talk to anyone. It’s playing defense on their part; they realize there are good buildings and crappy buildings.Phil: Remember when low-e first became a big thing? People didn’t understand it. They just thought they were getting crappy windows if they weren’t low-e. Now they want more insulation in the walls.Jesse: If someone wants a SIP house, we can talk about 10 different ways of doing the walls. We don’t spend as much time talking with clients about the roof or the basement or the foundation in the same way. Let’s talk about the whole building, not just obsess about the walls. The framing is 25 percent of the cost. We still have 75 percent of the house to talk about — like nontoxic materials. There are other things going on here, to try to get a building ready.Chris: Jesse, this segment’s starting to bother me. See you next time. Subscribe to Green Architects’ Lounge on iTunes—you’ll never miss a show, and it’s free! It’s one thing to design a house, and it’s another thing entirely to turn that design into a physical reality. In this episode, we kick back with an autumn cocktail (the Northern Spy) and talk about the process of bringing on a builder and the challenges of keeping relationships, quality, cost, and expectations managed along the way.Hey, do you want to talk about wall sections? Too bad. Jesse joins us for our “What’s Bothering Jesse?” segment, and he lets us know that he’s a little tired of all the attention that walls command from the green community. So, we’ll talk about that instead.The Highlights:The Northern Spy: Fresh apple cider makes this is a great cocktail for the fall season. It also makes a great beverage for toasting one of the great creators of our time, Steve Jobs, who passed away on October 5th. Here’s to you, Steve, without whom we would likely not even have a podcast. Also, I failed to mention in the podcast that this is a fairly modern drink, and as such, credit can and should be given to its creator Josey Packard of Alembic in San Fransisco.What defines a successful project? A happy client, to be sure, but also a happy architect and a happy builder.The architect’s public relations problem. We discuss how the architect is widely perceived by the public and builders.What’s the process? You could go out to bid, but we think a team approach is better.Bringing the builder in early? Here are the pros and cons. Pro: You get some cost control and input on methodology, but this must come with some understandings. Con: Did you lose your competitive advantage? What assurance do you have that you are getting the best bang for your buck?Have and set clear expectations. Like a good marriage, good communication is critical.What’s bothering Jesse? Walls! (Bet you didn’t see that coming.) RELATED CONTENT Integrated DesignThinning the Herd: How to Pick the Best Eco-BuilderDon’t forget to check back in later for Part 2, where we play “Three Questions” with three prominent green builders and get their input on this subject. Also, we tip our hats to some fellow Mainers for the work they’ve done, and of course Phil finishes with a song you should be listening to while you design.Thanks for listening. Cheers.last_img read more

Get Feedback Directly in Premiere With the New Wipster Add-On

first_imgWipster’s new integration seamlessly creates Premiere Pro markers from online client feedback.As a video professional, one of the biggest pain points that comes up during the editing process is getting feedback from clients. In the past, the best option was to upload a private video to Vimeo or YouTube and send your client a link. The client would then send their feedback and you’d have to repeat the process over and over.However, Wipster changed the game in 2014 by introducing editors to a new kind of review process. No longer would editors have to upload video versions to YouTube or Vimeo. Instead, users could use the Wipster interface to upload their videos and get client feedback with detailed instructions at certain points in the timeline. In a way, this was similar to adding markers in Premiere, except it took place entirely online.Outside of a few new players in the game and added workflow improvements, this review process has remained relatively similar over the last two years. However, Wipster just changed the game with a new feature that will certainly get Premiere Pro users excited: the Wipster Review PanelUsing this new Premiere Pro Add-On, you can now send videos directly from Premiere Pro to your clients for feedback. Once your clients review the video and add critiques online, their notes will automatically be placed into your Premiere Pro timeline as markers. This new feature will make it incredibly easy for you to get feedback without disrupting your workflow. In the words of Wipster CEO Rollo Wenlock:What used to be ten disconnected steps became just three with the arrival of Wipster, and is now down to one – the increased efficiencies will seriously help the bottom line of any company producing video.The Wipster Review Panel is available through the Add-On download page. Just navigate to Window>Browse Add-Ons to find it. Once installed, you will be prompted to input your Wipster account information. This helpful video explains how to use the new add-on. It’s a surprisingly simple process.This new service is currently only available to Wipster Video Pro users. You can create your own Wipster account for $15 a month, which is a great deal if you work a lot with video clients.What do you think of this new feature? How will it effect your workflow? Share in the comments below.last_img read more

Sales Is a Profession

first_img Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now If sales isn’t a profession, what is it?People often refer to sales as a trade in an attempt to distinguish it from a profession. The definition of a trade is “a skilled job, typically requiring manual skills and special training.” Both a carpenter and a brain surgery would meet that definition.The definition of profession is “a paid occupation, especially one that involves prolonged training and formal qualification.” The “paid occupation” part of that definition covers a lot of work that one might do. So does the prolonged training. It’s the formal qualification part that a lot of people believe is missing in sales.Some people believe that the lack of a university degree, or some other certification, disqualifies certain work from being a profession.Becoming a lawyer takes three years of law school before you are eligible to take the bar exam and be formally qualified to practice. After doing so, law is your profession. But there are plenty of terrible lawyers who are trained and certified.Medicine is a profession. But there are plenty of terrible doctors to offset the many excellent doctors practicing. It’s interesting that both lawyers and doctors are “practicing” their “professions.”There are professional engineers and architects, too. In one building I visit regularly the architect and engineer who redesigned the building built walls over the existing carpet. They may be “professionals” but their work isn’t.Why are there “professional comedians” and “professional football players” and “professional writers” and “professional musicians,” none of whom have any formal certification. It’s because it’s difficult to teach what a comedian, writer, or athlete does.Like these human endeavors, a lot of what salespeople do is difficult to quantify. Like all the professions listed above, the training and formal certification says nothing about the skills or abilities of the individual practicing the profession.Whether you are a professional or not has nothing to do with your University education or your formal certification. It has everything to do with how you approach your work, your intentions, and your willingness to give yourself over to your craft.Sales is a profession if you treat it like it is. If you treat it like something less, it will be that for you too.last_img read more

Robert Griffin III Dominates Michael VickLess Eagles

Robert Griffin III looked forward to playing opposite the Philadelphia Eagles’ Michael Vick on Sunday. But a concussion kept Philly’s quarterback sidelined. Vick had to be impressed with what he saw in Griffin, though, who played virtually a perfect game in leading the Washington Redskins to a rare easy win, 31-6.Griffin was 14-f0r-15 passing for 200 yards and a career-high four touchdowns for a perfect 158.3 quarterback rating. Griffin also rushed for 84 yards.The newly appointed rookie captain had touchdown passes to of 6 yards to fullback Darrel Young, 49 yards to wide receiver Aldrick Robinson, 61 yards to wideout Santana Moss and 17 yards to tight end Logan Paulsen.The Redskins, coming off their bye week, ended their losing streak at three games and improved their record to 4-6. In the oh-so-forgiving NFC East, that’s good enough for them to be two games behind the idle New York Giants and a game behind the Dallas Cowboys. The Redskins play a Thanksgiving Day game at Dallas.It was the Redskins’ largest margin of victory under their third-year coach, Mike Shanahan. Their most lopsided win under Shanahan previously had been 14 points.The last-place Eagles (3-7) extended to six the longest losing streak of coach Andy Reid’s 16-year tenure in Philadelphia. With Vick concussed, rookie starter Foles did nothing to secure the position. He looked lost most of the time and threw a pair of early interceptions and led the Eagles to only a pair of field goals. Tailback LeSean McCoy lost a fumble in the final seconds of the first half to set up a Redskins a field goal that gave Washington a 17-3 halftime lead.Cornerback DeAngelo Hall and safety Brandon Meriweather had the Redskins’ interceptions, but Meriweather, playing his first game this season, also suffered what the team called a sprained right knee.The Redskins go to Dallas for a Thanksgiving Day match that pits bitter rivals trying to move up the NFC East and earn a playoff spot. read more

How Randall Cunningham Taught NFL Quarterbacks To Fly

4Michael Vick2002679218330 27Greg Landry1971861113200 9Steve Young19921,737142263 20Kordell Stewart2001610132217 5Michael Vick2010860202327 23Colin Kaepernick2013803125216 Embed Code 10Greg Landry1972547167256 26Donovan McNabb2000232178201 In the latest installment in our documentary podcast series Ahead Of Their Time, we examine how Cunningham frustrated defenses not only with his speed and agility but also with his ability to throw the ball. It was a combination of skills that no quarterback had ever really possessed before, and it helped Cunningham transform the way people thought about the game’s most glamorous position. 3Russell Wilson2014659225335 2Robert Griffin III2012847218347 8Cam Newton2015633169266 28Russell Wilson2012952111199 Scan a list of the NFL’s best quarterbacks nowadays, and you’ll find names such as Russell Wilson, Cam Newton, Tyrod Taylor and even that of rookie sensation Dak Prescott — dynamic passers who can run the ball, too. The question of whether a team can succeed with that kind of dual threat under center has basically been settled in today’s game; such a QB has led his team to the Super Bowl in each of the past four seasons.1Colin Kaepernick did it in 2012; ditto Wilson in 2013 and 2014, and Newton in 2015. And no five-year period in modern NFL history2Going back to the start of the Super Bowl in the 1966 season. has seen quarterbacks gain more rushing yards per game than they have over the past five seasons. The golden age for mobile passers is right now.In the not-too-distant past, a quarterback was supposed to stay in the pocket, survey the field and make the throw — not take off and run. Not only was rushing mostly absent from the job description, it was often seen as a bad habit that needed to be discouraged. But Randall Cunningham helped change all that when he took the NFL by storm in the mid-1980s. 17Steve Grogan1978484146224 16Michael Vick2011593140226 Source: Pro-Football-Reference.com 12Daunte Culpepper20001,558129239 Greatest dual-threat QB seasons, 1966-2016 13Kordell Stewart1997422159231 14Rich Gannon2000947129227 1Randall Cunningham1990750249374 6Cam Newton2011512224311 7Cam Newton2012608195295 18Steve McNair1998450149224 25Donovan McNabb2002419141211 YARDS ABOVE BACKUP 21Randall Cunningham1992445144217 22Tyrod Taylor2015682129217 More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed By Neil Paine After flashing abilities as a passer, runner and punter at UNLV, Cunningham was selected in the second round of the 1985 NFL draft by the Philadelphia Eagles. And almost immediately, his unique skill set grabbed his teammates’ attention.“You knew there was something special about Randall,” former Eagles defensive back Eric Allen said. “[He was] extremely athletic, played with a great sense of self, understood that he was good, understood that he could do a lot of things that other quarterbacks in the game could not do, and he had a great deal of confidence.”Despite his talent, Cunningham sat behind Ron Jaworski, a more traditional dropback passer, for most of his first two NFL seasons. But he became Philly’s starter after Jaworski was hurt late in the 1986 season — and the Eagles’ iconoclastic coach, Buddy Ryan, soon let Cunningham loose as the game’s first true dual-threat QB.“Buddy Ryan allowed me to be the player he believed I could be,” Cunningham told me. “He saw something in me and gave me an opportunity to flourish as an athlete, and not just a quarterback, but to really take it to a whole other level.”Cunningham wasn’t the first mobile QB in NFL history. Before 1986, six quarterbacks had put up 500 or more rushing yards in a season; in 1972 alone, two of them — Bobby Douglass of the Chicago Bears and Greg Landry of the Detroit Lions — combined for a whopping 1,492 rushing yards and 17 rushing touchdowns. Those were the two best pre-Randall QB rushing seasons according to my yards above backup QB (YABQ) metric, which assigns a value to a quarterback’s passing and rushing statistics in a way similar to Football Outsiders’ yards above replacement (and can also be calculated throughout history).3Specifically, YABQ converts Chase Stuart’s calculations for a QB’s passing and rushing value above average into a measurement of total value that uses as its baseline a backup-level quarterback, a la Football Outsiders’ YAR metric. But Landry’s days as a scrambler were limited — he only had a couple more 200-yard rushing seasons in his 15-year NFL career — and Douglass, as great as he was running the ball, couldn’t throw.4Douglass generated fewer passing yards that season than a backup-level QB would have in the same number of attempts. There was the occasional outlier, like Minnesota’s Fran Tarkenton, who was a strong passer and able scrambler, but before Cunningham, those players were seen as unicorns more than archetypes.Cunningham ushered in the age of the running QB. In 1987, his first full season as Philadelphia’s starter, he passed for 349 more adjusted net yards than a backup-level QB (16th best in the NFL that year) and rushed for an additional 125 yards above backup (which easily led the league). It was the third time in history a quarterback had hit both of those benchmarks in the same season, after Landry in 1972 and Steve Grogan with the New England Patriots in 1978.5Along with Landry and Douglass, Grogan was another of the few pre-Cunningham QBs who could run; in 1976, he scored 12 touchdowns on the ground, a record for QBs until Cam Newton scored 14 in 2011. And Cunningham was just getting warmed up.In 1988, he piled up 336 YABQ through the air and 171 on the ground, the first time in league history that combination had ever been achieved. In a “down” 1989 season, he notched 248/147, a combo that had only been reached twice before (by Landry in ’72 and Cunningham himself in 1988). And in 1990, Cunningham set a standard for dual-threat seasons that has yet to be eclipsed in the 26 years since. That year, he was 750 yards better than a backup through the air, and he tacked on another 249 YABQ on the ground; if we take the harmonic mean of those two numbers (a particular kind of average that emphasizes high values in all numbers being averaged, in order to capture seasons when a player produced a lot of passing and rushing value), it’s the single best combined passing-rushing season by a QB in the Super Bowl era: PLAYERYEARPASSINGRUSHINGHARMONIC MEAN 19Daunte Culpepper2002288181222 11Steve Young19981,474133244 29Steve Young19911,030110199 30Steve McNair20011,102109198 24Cam Newton2013423143213 15Randall Cunningham1988336171226 There have been better pure passing seasons by mobile QBs; Steve Young had more than a few of them. As Cunningham told me, “People cannot forget about Steve Young, because [he] and I were battling out every single year to be the No. 1 rushing quarterback.” There have also been better QB rushing seasons; in 2006, Michael Vick became the first quarterback to break the 1,000-yard barrier in a season, though his passing was below the backup level that year. But nobody combined the two aspects of quarterbacking in a more prolific way than Cunningham did during that magical 1990 season, one which earned him league MVP honors from the Pro Football Writers of America.Alas, Cunningham would injure his knee in the Eagles’ 1991 opener, and miss the entire season. He returned in 1992 to produce what was, at the time, the sixth-best dual-threat season in modern history (according to my method above),6It ranks 21st now. but ongoing battles with injury and inconsistent play eventually paved Cunningham’s way out of Philly in 1995. After a year away from football entirely,7He spent the season running a granite company. a rejuvenated Cunningham joined the Minnesota Vikings and, in 1998, he enjoyed the 25th-best passing season of the Super Bowl era, according to YABQ — a testament to his skills as a pocket passer after his athleticism had eroded with age and wear.Cunningham finished his 16-year NFL career with the 40th-most total YABQ of any quarterback since 1966 and the second-most rushing YABQ — trailing only Vick. (He also generated about twice as much value through the air as Vick did.) But Cunningham’s biggest football legacy might be in the number of dual-threat QBs that followed in his footsteps. Before Cunningham’s 1987 season, only four quarterbacks had produced at least 200 passing and 100 rushing YABQ in the same season: Tarkenton, Landry (twice), Grogan and Doug Williams. Afterwards, 16 different quarterbacks pulled off the feat in 36 seasons, not including Cunningham himself. And 21 of the 25 best dual-threat seasons in modern history have taken place since Cunningham’s banner 1990 campaign.There are still quarterbacks in today’s NFL who play like the traditional archetype of the drop-back passer. But there are also a number of top QBs whose playing styles resemble that of Randall Cunningham. By proving that a quarterback could dominate the game with both his arm and his legs, Cunningham opened up a new path to success for subsequent generations of signal callers. So anytime a passer rolls out and fires a dart to a receiver who broke free because the defense was worried about the QB running, remember that in some small way, that play was made possible by the influence of a Philadelphia Eagle who changed the game three decades ago.This is part of our new podcast series “Ahead Of Their Time,” profiling players and managers in various sports who were underappreciated in their era. read more

Montella feels sorry for the fans

first_imgVincenzo Montella was sacked by Sevilla and he insisted that he feels sorry especially for the fans and he wants to apologize for the recent results – in his last game, Sevilla were beaten 2-1 by Levante…Montella managed to eliminate Manchester United from the Champions League and played very good two games against Bayern despite being beaten – but in the domestic competitions, it wasn’t that good and the club decided to sack the Italian coach.The former AC Milan manager spoke about his end at the club as he said, according to Sports Keeda:Sergio Ramos, Real MadridZidane reveals Sergio Ramos injury concern for Real Madrid Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Zinedine Zidane has put Sergio Ramos’ availability for Real Madrid’s trip to Sevilla next weekend in doubt after withdrawing him against Levante.“Thank you to the fans, who have been magnificent.”“I want to salute the players, who have made a huge effort – so much of which has been for me. I also want to thank all the people who work for the club who I’ve not been able to say goodbye to.”“I’m very sorry for the last moments. I can say that I’ve worked with strength and enthusiasm until the end. I’m convinced the club can qualify for Europe and for that reason, I ask for the fans to be close to the players and to give them their upmost support.”last_img read more