SCI’s Kyle Hollingsworth Shares New Funky Tune From The Sound Lab

first_imgLast month, The String Cheese Incident announced an exciting new creative workspace called The Sound Lab. For the first time in the band’s long history, Cheese purchased and furnished their own studio, and have been putting out new music from the Lab ever since. You can read all about it in our interview with Michael Kang.Today, it was keyboardist Kyle Hollingsworth who utilized the Lab, coming out with the second track from his Summer Sounds From The Lab project. Titled “Let Me In,” Hollingsworth describes the track:“Let Me In” is a guitar-driven funk tune that has some cool peaks and valleys. I’m looking forward to stretching this one live. The track also features a new singer I’m working with Tanya Shylock. She brings the right amount of soul and passion to the track.You can stream/download “Let Me In” below!The new release comes just a week after Hollingsworth’s first single, “Tumbling.” Check that out here!last_img read more

I can continue training horses until I die – DaCosta

first_imgAfter four decades and 1,926 Caymanas Park victories, trainer Wayne DaCosta became the record champion trainer at Caymanas Park after topping the field for the 15th time with 67 wins in 2015. DaCosta also surpassed legendary trainer and former record holder Phillip Feanny, who has 14 titles. His achievement, surpassing one of the all-time greats of regional training, has given DaCosta great satisfaction, but to him, winning the title in 2015 was no great surprise. “I was confident (coming into the year). I had a full stable of horses, so I didn’t see why the results would have been any different from last year (2014),” he told The Gleaner. “He (Feanny) is still one of the great trainers of Caymanas Park, so it’s definitely a honour to surpass his record. It (15th championship) was indeed satisfying, it’s a great feeling to be number one. I don’t know how long it will last, but I am on the top now, and it is really a good feeling getting the 15th win,” he stated. DaCosta, who is second on the all-time list of winners saddled at the Park, says his love and passion for racing is the secret to his success and he has no plans to take a break anytime soon. “I can continue [training horses] until I die. I am doing something that I like, and from 1976 when I got my licence, I have always liked it. I see no reason why I should stop. “However, you never can tell (how long it will continue) because the sport can change in the turn of a dime. But now everything looks good and I have some good horses in the top class and some nice three-year-olds coming next year, so it could be the same old, same old you never can tell. “I want to thank all of my owners who have stayed with me over the years and my groom, Linval McFarlane, who has been with me for more than 30 years as an assistant trainer. racing has good times and bad times, and you will never know when your bad time is going to come. But I have some nice horses. I hope they keep sound and make it a memorable year again,” he stated. DaCosta trained the top three horses in stakes last year – Derby and Diamond Mile winner SEEKING MY DREAM ($13.58 million), ALI BABA ($5.37m), PERFECT NEIGHBOUR ($5.08m). He was also the leading trainer for two-year-olds, earning $9.06m. Supreme Ventures Jamaica Two-year-old Stakes winner FUTURE KING was the leading earner in this category with $3.66m.last_img read more

Spring Design Announces Android-Based Dual-Screen eReader

first_imgTags:#E-Books#news#web Spring Design, a relatively unknown hardware design company, just announced that it will enter the eBook market with a dual-screen eReader based on the Android operating system. This device, the ‘Alex,’ will combine a 6-inch eInk display with a 3.5-inch color LCD touchscreen. According to Spring Design’s press release, the company will use an ‘enhanced’ version of the Android OS that has been optimized to facilitate the integration between the two screens. Spring Design plans to release this device later this year.HardwareThe dual-screen concept is definitely interesting and somewhat reminiscent of the rumored Barnes & Noble-branded eReader that is scheduled to be announced tomorrow. For now, Spring Design’s press release remains quiet about any content partnerships. Even though the company says that the device will be able to connect to 3G, EVDO/CDMA and GSM networks, Spring Design doesn’t appear to be ready to announce any partnerships there either.Multimedia Books Maybe the most interesting aspect of the device is that the company plans to give developers and publishers the ability to enhance the text that appears in the eInk screen with multimedia content on the LCD screen. This could open up a lot of new avenues for publishers, but at the same time, we have to wonder how many publishers would be willing to develop new content for this device. Creating an eBook version of a manuscript is easy, but adding additional content to this text could quickly become a costly undertaking.Color Us SkepticalGiven how vague the details are, we remain skeptical about this device until we get more details. For now, all we know is that it will run Android, feature two screens and have an SD card slot, and that users will be able to cache Web content on the device and then display it on the eInk screen.We also can’t help but look at the device and think that it would be rather unwieldy to use. It is definitely exciting to see that somebody is using Android to develop an eReader, but this device seems to forgo usability for novelty. While we are all looking forward to color eInk displays, this device looks like an odd chimera that is meant to bridge the gap between these two generations. In the long run, this concept probably doesn’t have much of a future. frederic lardinois A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts last_img read more

Let There Be Light — on the GU24 base for CFLs and LEDs

first_imgAre we really ready to say goodbye to incandescent light bulbs? The ones that give off 10% light and 90% heat? The ones with the shortest life span? The ones that have the lowest initial price, don’t flicker, are always instant on-instant off, and give off the “right” color and quality of light? Not so fast and not so easy…We have been here before: 2- and 4-pin CFL fixtures!Many of us have been here: wired a project with 2- or 4-pin CFL fixtures so that the lighting STAYED efficient when lamps (bulbs) needed to be replaced, only to hear complaints about the quality of the CFL pin lamps, the lack of wattage flexibility of the pin CFL lamps, the price of the CFL pin lamp replacements; or even worse, hear (at very high decibel levels) that there were no replacement pin lamps even being stocked by local retail.GU24 base lamps are the future of energy-efficient lightingI think we have it right this time: the relatively new GU24 base (see attached images). This new base has a 2-pin base that you simply twist and click to replace the lamp (bulb). It eliminates inappropriate incandescent lamp (bulb) replacement but allows replacement with ANY wattage of CFL OR LED. And the GU24 makes for a shorter base than the standard medium screw base (E26) so no worries over new CFL or LED lamps fitting into tight fixtures.Are Energy Star and industry embracing the new exclusively CFL/LED GU24 base?Yes, they are. As of this writing, the majority of Energy Star fixtures are using the GU24 base and there are a full range of CFLs and a growing number of LED lamps with the GU24 configuration, both in local retail and online. When I checked online, GU24 lamps of all types and wattages were widely available and our local True Value hardware store carries them. (The local Ace hardware store is not yet stocking them, but employees reported a growing interest and special orders for GU24 lamps).Energy Star stated that the new draft of their GU24 product criteria will be out in early September of this year and the GU24 base is becoming more popular with LED lighting manufacturers as well.What should affordable housing providers do about GU24?In states with strict energy codes, you will probably be more and more “pressured” or motivated to consider GU24 — it’s the way to go, at least for new construction. In retrofit, depending on how the building code applies, you may want to go to GU24 as part of going green, moving your homes to GU24-base light fixtures.The slightly higher first cost of a GU24-base CFL will be more than covered by the energy savings and longer life of the CFL compared to any incandescent bulb. And maybe you will want to offer rebate vouchers for GU24 lamps as a way of sharing your commitment to energy-efficient lighting with your clients.What about LEDs and affordable housing?LEDs are really not yet a good fit for affordable housing. While many lighting experts feel that LEDs are the bulb of the future and the LED market share is growing rapidly, LEDs are changing all the time and their first cost is still too high for the affordable housing market.Most importantly, LED performance metrics need to change, to better separate out the LED wheat from the chaff. The new Energy Star product criteria for CFLs do a much better job in this respect, but LED product criteria are just not there yet.last_img read more

Can David Goffin Keep Winning

At a recent practice in Mons, Belgium, the country’s former leading man and its current top tennis player traded missiles from the baseline. Olivier Rochus grunted as he leapt into his classical one-handed backhand, while David Goffin quietly parried with groundstrokes into the corners. Goffin won most of the exchanges, and all 10 of the games.Rochus showed his frustration after it was done by sending a ball into the stands at the Lotto Mons Expo, where Belgium’s biggest men’s tennis tournament is taking place this week. But in a court-side interview afterwards, Rochus, who is 33 and retiring after this tournament, pointed out that he is in good company. “When my opponent is way better, what can you say? … It’s not only tough for me, it’s tough for everybody. I’m not the only one losing,” he said.Just about everyone is losing to the 23-year-old Goffin these days. From the start of July to the start of this tournament, Goffin won 34 of 36 matches, including the first 25, improving his ranking from 106th in the world to No. 31. In his 34 wins, he lost just four sets, and has been forced into just five tiebreakers. The rest of the sets he won decisively, seven by 6-0 and 11 by 6-1.Goffin’s glorious two and a half months had yielded nearly as much success as he had achieved in his prior four years as a pro. He’s won 17 tour-level matches and roughly $340,000 in earnings, increasing his career totals by about a half and a third, respectively.Goffin’s winning run is only matched in the last decade by the players who have been No. 1 during that time: Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic. No one else since 2004 has won 25 straight matches at tour, tour qualifying or challenger events, according to ATP World Tour stats guru Greg Sharko.Evidently, there are two ways to pull off a 25-match winning streak in tennis today: Be one of the best players of all time, or do what Goffin has done — set yourself an easy schedule and combine it with luck and improved play. Tennis players, unlike, say, NFL teams, can decide which events they play. Goffin and his coach chose ones with relatively weak fields — just nine of Goffin’s 34 wins were against players ranked above him — and now the young Belgian is on a winning run usually only experienced by the game’s very best.Winning brings ranking points, which means easier draws. It also brings money, which can be invested in coaches, physical trainers and more comfortable travel. The downside of winning is that it leaves little time for rest and for major work in practice. And if it comes against easy opponents, it may not provide useful preparation for tougher ones.But there are psychological advantages to winning. “You don’t doubt, you just attack every ball and then you are sure the ball will be in the court. It’s a great feeling,” Goffin said.Before his recent run, Goffin had been most famous for his losses. He made his Grand Slam debut as a lucky loser, snagging a spot in the draw despite losing in the last round of qualifying. He parlayed that berth in the 2012 French Open into a fourth-round loss to Federer, his childhood idol, and attained fame for smiling through an on-court interview afterward with the man whose face adorned posters on Goffin’s childhood bedroom walls. Goffin’s later Grand Slam losses also were to top players: Six of nine came to players seeded in the Top 10, four of those in the first round. The lucky loser had become an unlucky loser.Goffin sensed he was improving before his results did. In March of this year he started working with his current coach, Thierry van Cleemput, and began enjoying tennis again, shedding the defensiveness and doubtfulness that had plagued his game. But he kept running into tough competition, culminating with what van Cleemput called a “nightmare” of a draw in Wimbledon, against defending champion Andy Murray in the first round.Goffin and his coach decided it was time to step down a level. As most of the tour’s top players either rested after Wimbledon or moved to hard courts to prepare for the U.S. Open, Goffin stayed in Europe, on clay, entering a tournament in each week of July: three challengers — a rung below tour level — and one at the bottom level of the tour. He won all four tournaments. (Up until then, he had never won more than eight straight matches.) Then he came to the U.S. and won seven of nine matches — taking a set 6-0 off No. 8 Grigor Dimitrov. Back in Europe, he won seven straight matches, to send Belgium back to the top level of the Davis Cup and to win his second career title, again at the bottom level of the tour.“We decided to play some challengers to try to win some matches and to get some confidence,” Goffin said. “The level was there in practice and against Murray, but what I needed was to win some matches and to play a lot of matches.” He added, “I didn’t expect to win so many matches.” After all, he hadn’t made it past the quarterfinals of the four prior challengers he’d played this year.Van Cleemput said he and his young charge have been “lucky.” The coach is setting expectations low, despite Goffin’s recent run. Van Cleemput said Goffin’s target is for a career like that of No. 23 Alexandr Dolgopolov, a player from Ukraine who has never reached a Grand Slam semifinal or been ranked in the Top 10. Goffin has earned more ranking points since Wimbledon than five members of the Top 10, but van Cleemput isn’t expecting him to join that group any time soon. “The first objective now is to confirm the level of top 40, and to come near the level of the top 30,” he said. “The reality is important, not to dream all the time.”Recent tennis history supports the coach’s caution. Federer, Nadal and Djokovic didn’t play any challengers during their 25-match winning streaks. Much less familiar names precede Goffin’s on the list of players to win three straight challengers in the past 10 years. None has ever been ranked in the Top 30.It’s not only luck and easy opposition that has propelled Goffin to new heights. It’s also his serve. He hit aces on more than one in nine service points in eight of his 14 tour-level matches on hard courts this summer. He’d done that in just three of 50 prior hard-court matches at that level. It’s a remarkable feat for a player who is 5’11.” Height translates into the ability to hit at a sharper downward angle without the net getting in the way, which makes it easier to hit serves that are both fast and in the box. No one under 6′ has won a Grand Slam title in the past decade.Dolgopolov, the tour’s best sub-6-foot server, raises his contact point by leaping into the air. Goffin’s service motion is striking for how little he gets off the ground. Van Cleemput said his main intervention was to change Goffin’s toss and to emphasize the follow-through.Van Cleemput wants to get Goffin leaping higher on his serve, and to improve his strength and fitness. But when his player keeps playing events late into each week, he doesn’t get much time to work with him. For now, most of Goffin’s practice sessions are live matches.Goffin is confident he’ll have plenty of chances to work on his game and to keep getting better. “I have a lot of years in the future to do some good things,” he said — though he may never do anything as good as his unbeaten late-summer run. read more

In 126 Years English Football Has Seen 13475 NilNil Draws

For his day job, James Curley, 36, is an assistant professor of psychology at Columbia University, working on the neuroendocrinological basis of social behavior. But in his downtime he tries to answer different kinds of mysteries: What was the first soccer game he ever went to? (He remembered the vague details, but not the specifics.) How often have his two favorite teams played each other over the last century? And is soccer really as dull as some people say?The answers to those questions were surprisingly difficult to find. But Curley used the same approach he uses in his academic career: data, lots and lots of data. By cobbling together game results from several different sources, he has compiled what is almost certainly the world’s biggest compendium of English football scores. Sitting on his GitHub page, devoid of any fanfare whatsoever, are the scores of nearly 200,000 English soccer games played in the top four leagues since 1888, the days of Jack the Ripper and Queen Victoria.1These games are from the English football “league” system. Currently, this encompasses the top four tiers of the English football pyramid, or 92 teams. These 14 megabytes can tell remarkable stories, dating back more than 125 years to the founding of the English football league.Take the most common final score, for example. In 188,060 league games,2For context, this is very similar to the total number of major league baseball games played since 1900. the final tally was most often 1-0, proof, for Curley, that soccer was as low-scoring as he suspected. This result has occurred in more than 30,000 games — 16 percent of the total. Other common scores: 2-1 (about 27,000 games), 2-0 (about 22,000) and 1-1 (about 22,000).In 85,694 games — dangerously close to half the total — at least one of the teams forgot to score at all. That led Curley to an answer for one of his questions: “Soccer is a bit dull,” he told me.Here is the distribution of home and away teams’ goal-scoring throughout history:Scores are likely to be low. In more than 85 percent of all games, neither team scored more than three goals.Those low scores help lead to thousands of draws — 47,412 since the foundation of the league system, to be exact. That’s more than a quarter of all games. And 7 percent of games overall have ended with no one scoring, and no one winning — there have been 13,475 nil-nil draws.In another testament to the sport’s “dullness,” draws have become more common over football’s long history. (Last season, 27 percent of games ended without a winner. ) This chart shows the prevalence of drawn games3Throughout, the year refers to the start of the season, e.g. 1950 refers to the 1950-1951 football season.:In 1890, just 12 percent of games were drawn, and in 1977, 626 games out of 2,028, or 31 percent, were draws. While this number is down slightly today, we’re near the historical high.That’s partly because of a decrease in scoring generally. As English soccer has wound its way through the decades, its scoring has withered. Here are the historical averages of goals scored per game, by league level: The average number of goals per game has at times wildly fluctuated, particularly with the sudden spikes and subsequent declines in the two postwar eras. In 1925, FIFA amended the offside rule. Prior to the change, three players had to be between an attacker and the goal when the ball was passed to him. The new rule changed this to two players (typically a defender and the goalkeeper), giving more leeway to attackers, and led to a dramatic, instant increase in scoring.The reasons for the other big shifts are less clear. Rule changes — the kinds of things that would usually explain variation in goals — are quite rare in soccer’s history.In 1958, substitutions were allowed for the first time, but only for an injured player. This roughly corresponds with the beginning of a steep decline in scoring in the 1960s. This could make for a plausible causal explanation: Perhaps playing with an injured player left teams extremely vulnerable on defense, leading to many goals. The addition of the substitute may have mitigated these effects.Other rules changes — the introduction of red and yellow cards in 1970, another tweak to the offside rule in 1990, banning goalkeepers’ handling of back-passes in 1992 — don’t seem to correlate with any major changes in scoring. In particular, the decline after 1930, and the rise after 1950, aren’t well explained. Some of these changes may be due to the evolution of football tactics, something that is laid out, for example, in Jonathan Wilson’s “Inverting the Pyramid.” In the early days, soccer featured a large number of forwards, but tactical changes led to a larger number of defensive and midfield players. The shifts in the game, and in the game theory of its tactics, may well have led to shifts in overall scoring.In 1981 there was a rule change of another type: To calculate standings, teams were given three points for a win and one point for a draw. Before 1981, only two points were awarded for a win. This change gave teams less incentive, generally, to settle for a draw. This could have led to more aggressive play, and more goals. However, the effect may not operate in just one direction. Once a team does score, that team has all the more incentive to shut the game down and hold out to win having scored just a goal. 1981 did indeed see a small jump in goals, and goal-scoring was elevated for a few years after.However, the change was not large and has not persisted. Goal-scoring seems to have reached something of an equilibrium in the past 30 years or so, corresponding with some of the lowest levels of scoring of the past 125 years.Curley’s reticent about how long his mammoth database took to put together. “I’m not sure I want to tell you, actually,” he joked, “Because then my wife would find out.”Curley is also quick to add that the data did exist elsewhere — although it’s typically scattered, proprietary, or hard to access. He assembled it from the webpages of the Rec.Sports.Soccer Statistics Foundation, from other compilers and GitHub users, from ESPN’s own database, and elsewhere, and made it freely available.“Because I believe in open access to data — I’m a strong advocate of that in science — I just generally have a view that if data is out there, and as long as it’s not owned by someone, then it’s good to have it out in the public,” he said. “I knew there were people who would enjoy it, so I thought, ‘Well, why not give it to them?’”Curley’s academic work and soccer work overlap. Much of his academic work, for example, is concerned with pairwise contest models — contests where two entities compete at a time — and social hierarchies. These issues are often tackled with formulae like the Elo system, which calculates soccer rankings. The parallel to his soccer hobby is obvious. Soccer games, after all, are pairwise contests.Other psychological concepts infused our discussion of soccer. Unlike most fans of English football, Curley roots for two teams. Aston Villa is nature — Curley’s father, and his father’s father, back 100 years, were season ticket-holders — York City is nurture. Conveniently, using the data set of his own creation, he can chart his two teams’ shared history, answering one of his questions. (“Fortunately, they’ve barely ever even crossed paths. So I’ve never had to choose.”)And like the academic he is, he’s performed a sort of peer review of other sources’ soccer data. Case in point, on Nov. 26, 1983, Doncaster Rovers played Chester to a 0-0 draw, in a fourth-tier match. This game is unknown even to ESPN’s database. But not to James Curley’s.“An appropriately completely dull game,” he said. And just one of 188,060.CORRECTION (Oct. 4, 5:30 p.m.): A footnote in an earlier version of this story misstated the number of teams in the top four tiers of the English football league system; there are 92 such teams, not 94. read more

The Eagles And Ravens Are Screwed

We’re two weeks into the NFL season, and nine teams are 0-2. But these winless squads are not created equal: The Seattle Seahawks, last season’s NFC champion, are clearly in better shape than the terrible Chicago Bears. Still, two games is an eighth of the season, and two early losses can wipe out even the best teams’ margin of error for the rest of the season.So, how bad is it to start 0-2? And which of these nine teams have already screwed up their playoff chances? Watch the video below to find out; you can see the chart we discuss at the bottom of the post.If you’re into this kind of statistical banter, subscribe to FiveThirtyEight’s sports podcast, Hot Takedown. Check out our NFL predictions for odds on every game this season.

How Randall Cunningham Taught NFL Quarterbacks To Fly

4Michael Vick2002679218330 27Greg Landry1971861113200 9Steve Young19921,737142263 20Kordell Stewart2001610132217 5Michael Vick2010860202327 23Colin Kaepernick2013803125216 Embed Code 10Greg Landry1972547167256 26Donovan McNabb2000232178201 In the latest installment in our documentary podcast series Ahead Of Their Time, we examine how Cunningham frustrated defenses not only with his speed and agility but also with his ability to throw the ball. It was a combination of skills that no quarterback had ever really possessed before, and it helped Cunningham transform the way people thought about the game’s most glamorous position. 3Russell Wilson2014659225335 2Robert Griffin III2012847218347 8Cam Newton2015633169266 28Russell Wilson2012952111199 Scan a list of the NFL’s best quarterbacks nowadays, and you’ll find names such as Russell Wilson, Cam Newton, Tyrod Taylor and even that of rookie sensation Dak Prescott — dynamic passers who can run the ball, too. The question of whether a team can succeed with that kind of dual threat under center has basically been settled in today’s game; such a QB has led his team to the Super Bowl in each of the past four seasons.1Colin Kaepernick did it in 2012; ditto Wilson in 2013 and 2014, and Newton in 2015. And no five-year period in modern NFL history2Going back to the start of the Super Bowl in the 1966 season. has seen quarterbacks gain more rushing yards per game than they have over the past five seasons. The golden age for mobile passers is right now.In the not-too-distant past, a quarterback was supposed to stay in the pocket, survey the field and make the throw — not take off and run. Not only was rushing mostly absent from the job description, it was often seen as a bad habit that needed to be discouraged. But Randall Cunningham helped change all that when he took the NFL by storm in the mid-1980s. 17Steve Grogan1978484146224 16Michael Vick2011593140226 Source: Pro-Football-Reference.com 12Daunte Culpepper20001,558129239 Greatest dual-threat QB seasons, 1966-2016 13Kordell Stewart1997422159231 14Rich Gannon2000947129227 1Randall Cunningham1990750249374 6Cam Newton2011512224311 7Cam Newton2012608195295 18Steve McNair1998450149224 25Donovan McNabb2002419141211 YARDS ABOVE BACKUP 21Randall Cunningham1992445144217 22Tyrod Taylor2015682129217 More: Apple Podcasts | ESPN App | RSS | Embed By Neil Paine After flashing abilities as a passer, runner and punter at UNLV, Cunningham was selected in the second round of the 1985 NFL draft by the Philadelphia Eagles. And almost immediately, his unique skill set grabbed his teammates’ attention.“You knew there was something special about Randall,” former Eagles defensive back Eric Allen said. “[He was] extremely athletic, played with a great sense of self, understood that he was good, understood that he could do a lot of things that other quarterbacks in the game could not do, and he had a great deal of confidence.”Despite his talent, Cunningham sat behind Ron Jaworski, a more traditional dropback passer, for most of his first two NFL seasons. But he became Philly’s starter after Jaworski was hurt late in the 1986 season — and the Eagles’ iconoclastic coach, Buddy Ryan, soon let Cunningham loose as the game’s first true dual-threat QB.“Buddy Ryan allowed me to be the player he believed I could be,” Cunningham told me. “He saw something in me and gave me an opportunity to flourish as an athlete, and not just a quarterback, but to really take it to a whole other level.”Cunningham wasn’t the first mobile QB in NFL history. Before 1986, six quarterbacks had put up 500 or more rushing yards in a season; in 1972 alone, two of them — Bobby Douglass of the Chicago Bears and Greg Landry of the Detroit Lions — combined for a whopping 1,492 rushing yards and 17 rushing touchdowns. Those were the two best pre-Randall QB rushing seasons according to my yards above backup QB (YABQ) metric, which assigns a value to a quarterback’s passing and rushing statistics in a way similar to Football Outsiders’ yards above replacement (and can also be calculated throughout history).3Specifically, YABQ converts Chase Stuart’s calculations for a QB’s passing and rushing value above average into a measurement of total value that uses as its baseline a backup-level quarterback, a la Football Outsiders’ YAR metric. But Landry’s days as a scrambler were limited — he only had a couple more 200-yard rushing seasons in his 15-year NFL career — and Douglass, as great as he was running the ball, couldn’t throw.4Douglass generated fewer passing yards that season than a backup-level QB would have in the same number of attempts. There was the occasional outlier, like Minnesota’s Fran Tarkenton, who was a strong passer and able scrambler, but before Cunningham, those players were seen as unicorns more than archetypes.Cunningham ushered in the age of the running QB. In 1987, his first full season as Philadelphia’s starter, he passed for 349 more adjusted net yards than a backup-level QB (16th best in the NFL that year) and rushed for an additional 125 yards above backup (which easily led the league). It was the third time in history a quarterback had hit both of those benchmarks in the same season, after Landry in 1972 and Steve Grogan with the New England Patriots in 1978.5Along with Landry and Douglass, Grogan was another of the few pre-Cunningham QBs who could run; in 1976, he scored 12 touchdowns on the ground, a record for QBs until Cam Newton scored 14 in 2011. And Cunningham was just getting warmed up.In 1988, he piled up 336 YABQ through the air and 171 on the ground, the first time in league history that combination had ever been achieved. In a “down” 1989 season, he notched 248/147, a combo that had only been reached twice before (by Landry in ’72 and Cunningham himself in 1988). And in 1990, Cunningham set a standard for dual-threat seasons that has yet to be eclipsed in the 26 years since. That year, he was 750 yards better than a backup through the air, and he tacked on another 249 YABQ on the ground; if we take the harmonic mean of those two numbers (a particular kind of average that emphasizes high values in all numbers being averaged, in order to capture seasons when a player produced a lot of passing and rushing value), it’s the single best combined passing-rushing season by a QB in the Super Bowl era: PLAYERYEARPASSINGRUSHINGHARMONIC MEAN 19Daunte Culpepper2002288181222 11Steve Young19981,474133244 29Steve Young19911,030110199 30Steve McNair20011,102109198 24Cam Newton2013423143213 15Randall Cunningham1988336171226 There have been better pure passing seasons by mobile QBs; Steve Young had more than a few of them. As Cunningham told me, “People cannot forget about Steve Young, because [he] and I were battling out every single year to be the No. 1 rushing quarterback.” There have also been better QB rushing seasons; in 2006, Michael Vick became the first quarterback to break the 1,000-yard barrier in a season, though his passing was below the backup level that year. But nobody combined the two aspects of quarterbacking in a more prolific way than Cunningham did during that magical 1990 season, one which earned him league MVP honors from the Pro Football Writers of America.Alas, Cunningham would injure his knee in the Eagles’ 1991 opener, and miss the entire season. He returned in 1992 to produce what was, at the time, the sixth-best dual-threat season in modern history (according to my method above),6It ranks 21st now. but ongoing battles with injury and inconsistent play eventually paved Cunningham’s way out of Philly in 1995. After a year away from football entirely,7He spent the season running a granite company. a rejuvenated Cunningham joined the Minnesota Vikings and, in 1998, he enjoyed the 25th-best passing season of the Super Bowl era, according to YABQ — a testament to his skills as a pocket passer after his athleticism had eroded with age and wear.Cunningham finished his 16-year NFL career with the 40th-most total YABQ of any quarterback since 1966 and the second-most rushing YABQ — trailing only Vick. (He also generated about twice as much value through the air as Vick did.) But Cunningham’s biggest football legacy might be in the number of dual-threat QBs that followed in his footsteps. Before Cunningham’s 1987 season, only four quarterbacks had produced at least 200 passing and 100 rushing YABQ in the same season: Tarkenton, Landry (twice), Grogan and Doug Williams. Afterwards, 16 different quarterbacks pulled off the feat in 36 seasons, not including Cunningham himself. And 21 of the 25 best dual-threat seasons in modern history have taken place since Cunningham’s banner 1990 campaign.There are still quarterbacks in today’s NFL who play like the traditional archetype of the drop-back passer. But there are also a number of top QBs whose playing styles resemble that of Randall Cunningham. By proving that a quarterback could dominate the game with both his arm and his legs, Cunningham opened up a new path to success for subsequent generations of signal callers. So anytime a passer rolls out and fires a dart to a receiver who broke free because the defense was worried about the QB running, remember that in some small way, that play was made possible by the influence of a Philadelphia Eagle who changed the game three decades ago.This is part of our new podcast series “Ahead Of Their Time,” profiling players and managers in various sports who were underappreciated in their era. read more

Clement Lenglet – a man in demand

first_imgLenglet came to Sevilla as a relative unknown and is now being chased by Europe’s elite.That’s how good the Frenchman has been for Sevilla this season. The defender has featured more than any other player for the Andalusians and was superb in both legs when Vincenzo Montella’s men knocked Manchester United out of the Champions League. This is what Lenglet’s coach had to say about him:“Lenglet is a champion in the head and on the pitch,”Considering his release clause is currently set at €30 million, a silly number in comparison to the sums that have been paid recently for players of his caliber, plenty of teams are making phone calls.harry maguire, manchester UnitedMaguire says United need to build on today’s win George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Harry Maguire wants his United teammates to build on the victory over Leicester City.During the summer, Harry Maguire was referred to as the ultimate…Clement has stated that he’s satisfied in Seville at the moment. According to Goal.com, it was the first foreign club that contacted him.“My parents came to Seville and they thought the city was incredible. From that moment, I wanted to come, but my club didn’t want to let me go. So when they called to sign me last January, I fulfilled a dream, something I had been dreaming of since the age of 17.”Sevilla is unlikely to give up on Lenglet easily and if he doesn’t want to leave, he won’t. However, that won’t stop teams such as Barcelona and Manchester United to try to lure him away from Andalusia. At least that’s what Calcio Mercato says. They’re currently the front-runners for his signature with Liverpool and Juventus not far behind.last_img read more

Benitez Newcastle determined to bounce back from shaky start

first_imgNewcastle United boss Rafael Benitez insists his side are determined to turn around their fortunes heading into Saturday’s trip to Crystal PalaceThe Magpies have just one point from their first five games of their Premier League campaign.Benitez’s recent defensive approach has been openly questioned by critics with Chelsea coach Maurizio Sarri admitting that he was surprised to see the Spaniard use such tactics.But Benitez insists that Newcastle will be going all-out to claim the three points at Selhurst Park this weekend.“We want to win. We want to get three points in every game, but especially after the start,” said Benitez on Chronicle Live.“We should be closer with these teams.Roberto Firmino, LiverpoolVirgil van Dijk praises Roberto Firmino after Liverpool’s win Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Virgil van Dijk hailed team-mate Roberto Firmino after coming off the bench to inspire Liverpool to a 3-1 comeback win against Newcastle United.“It will not be easy, but we have more chance.“Our idea is to win, but if we can’t, then a draw is OK”“Every game is an opportunity to get three points for us.“Watching these games, on paper they were difficult. On paper these ones are ‘easier’, but every game is a challenge for us.“It is a difficult game but I’m confident we can win.”last_img read more