University research team creates augmented reality sandbox w Video

first_img More information: Project page idav.ucdavis.edu/~okreylos/ResDev/SARndbox/ What’s even cooler is the fact that the software used to create the simulations is all available under a GNU public license agreement, which means most any school, museum or other teaching program could build a similar system at very little cost. With such a system, students can gain a deeper understanding of how land and water systems interact and see for themselves how changes to topography over time cause changes in the environment in a much more hands-on fashion than when building static models out of sand, dirt or clay. Pico projector used in eye based video gaming system Explore further © 2012 Phys.Org (Phys.org) — Most children at some point in their schooling are taught about the water table and many wind up being tasked with creating a model of some sort to represent how it all works. Some use clay, but many more likely use sand, as it’s far easier and faster than most anything else. Now researchers at UC Davis have taken that model to new extremes by building a sandbox system that is capable of automatically adding augmented reality real-time coloring to the sand to indicate altitude and moving water as changes are made to the terrain with a hand or small tool.last_img read more

Google Is Launching a Tool That Will Tell You if Solar Panels

first_imgAugust 18, 2015 This story originally appeared on Engadget Adding solar panels to your roof can be frustrating, since it’s often difficult to know if your home receives enough light to justify the investment. Google Maps, however, has satellite, navigation and sunlight data for every property in the world, so it’s ideally placed to tell you how many rays hit your crib on a daily basis. That’s why the firm is launching Sunroof, a database of how much solar energy hits each building in a city, helping people work out if it’s worth the effort. Sunroof is intended as a “treasure map” for future green energy projects, telling you how much of a saving you’d make and how long it’d take to make back your initial outlay.To begin with, Project Sunroof will only be available in three locations: Boston, San Francisco and Fresno. If it turns out to be successful, however, then Google will roll the service out to the rest of the country and, possibly, the world. Once you’ve put in your address, you’ll be told how much you’re likely to save in energy costs, and then be put in touch with a local installer.We tested the service out on Aol’s building in San Francisco, and it told us that we received 1,840 hours of usable sunlight per year. In addition, we learned that we have roughly 15,641 square feet of available space that we could use to install solar panels. It then took us through our options, letting us know that we’d save $14,000 if we leased the hardware, or $24,000 if we bought them outright. So, if you’re in one of these three areas, why not share how much Google thinks you’re likely to save and if that’ll prompt you into signing up. Hear from business owners and CEOs who went through a crippling business problem and came out the other side bigger and stronger. Problem Solvers with Jason Feifer Listen Now 2 min readlast_img read more