SCI’s Kyle Hollingsworth Shares New Funky Tune From The Sound Lab

first_imgLast month, The String Cheese Incident announced an exciting new creative workspace called The Sound Lab. For the first time in the band’s long history, Cheese purchased and furnished their own studio, and have been putting out new music from the Lab ever since. You can read all about it in our interview with Michael Kang.Today, it was keyboardist Kyle Hollingsworth who utilized the Lab, coming out with the second track from his Summer Sounds From The Lab project. Titled “Let Me In,” Hollingsworth describes the track:“Let Me In” is a guitar-driven funk tune that has some cool peaks and valleys. I’m looking forward to stretching this one live. The track also features a new singer I’m working with Tanya Shylock. She brings the right amount of soul and passion to the track.You can stream/download “Let Me In” below!The new release comes just a week after Hollingsworth’s first single, “Tumbling.” Check that out here!last_img read more

Peru’s crime worries tainting Venezuelans who want to work

first_imgLIMA, Peru (AP) — Thousands of Venezuelans in Peru lost jobs as delivery drivers, cooks and casino workers when the coronavirus pandemic began. Many pivoted to other jobs, while others started their own small businesses. But their efforts to make honest livings have increasingly been overshadowed by local attention to the crimes of a few Venezuelans. Activists say that’s fueling xenophobia among Peruvians. With elections coming in April, some politicians have been focusing on migrants who they say are disproportionately involved in crime. But the U.N. says government data belie claims Venezuelans are more involved in wrongdoing.last_img

Dorms celebrate Christmas traditions

first_imgAcross Notre Dame’s campus, there’s an unmistakable feeling that Christmas is in the air. Many dorms are celebrating the holiday season with their own unique traditions. Last week, many Carroll Hall residents could be seen sporting elf costumes, advertising Carroll’s highly-anticipated Carroll Christmas, which was held Saturday, Dec. 1. Junior Garrett Rethman, who is serving as Carroll’s president this year, said he looks forward to bringing students together every year during the event.“It’s a good event to get people to come to Carroll,” Rethman said. Observer File Photo O’Neill Hall’s Christmas “O” wreath brightens the days of students during the Christmas season.Carroll’s Christmas tradition, which is a signature event for the dorm, first began with a tree lighting but has since expanded to include indoor activities. The event now offers visitors cookies, Santa’s Workshop, karaoke and a horse and carriage.“When I found out I was in Carroll, one of the things I read about was [that] Carroll Christmas is the big tradition,” Rethman said. “It’s like the last big, fun event before finals start. We put a lot of work into it leading up to the event, and then it’s really rewarding to have lots of people come from across campus to enjoy the work we put on for them.”The women of Cavanaugh Hall share many Christmas traditions, including a tree lighting and a section-decorating competition, but their biggest event is Cavanaugh’s annual Christmas pageant. Junior Emma Brady, Cavanaugh’s president, says that faculty families and South Bend residents come to watch Cavanaugh’s largely improvised and entertaining performance of the Nativity.Cavanaugh junior Emily Black says that the pageant is a great opportunity to connect with the South Bend community.“There are a lot of families that will come every year … so you get to see kids grow up,” Black said. “They come back the next year and they’re like a foot taller than they were the year before.”At O’Neill Hall, the trademark O’Neill “O” wreath glows from the dorm’s third floor. Junior John Desler, O’Neill’s president, believes the wreath is a fun way to celebrate the holidays. “I love coming back from fall break and seeing all the Christmas decorations up everywhere,” Desler said.This year, the unveiling of the O’Neill “O” was a pleasant surprise for many O’Neill residents.“One day we woke up and our B-side stairway was closed and we were like, ‘Oh, what’s going on?’” Desler said. Once he realized that the stairs had been closed for the wreath-hanging, Desler said he “was really happy with having to walk an extra minute to go around.”In the weeks before finals, the “O” wreath provides students with a much-needed boost of holiday cheer, Desler said.“It’s a good reminder of the Christmas spirit,” Desler said.Tags: Carroll Christmas, Carroll Hall, Cavanaugh Hall, christmas, dorm community, O’Neill Hall, The Nativitylast_img read more