Cuba president welcomes US senator Google CEO

first_imgCuban President Miguel Diaz-Canel. Photo: ReutersCuban president Miguel Diaz-Canel welcomed US republican senator Jeff Flake and Google CEO Eric Schmidt to the island country.During their meeting on Monday, Diaz-Canel and the US visitors exchanged views on the state of bilateral relations and possible areas of cooperation and “mutual interest”, reports Efe news.Flake, who has visited Cuba several times, the most recent trip being in January, is one of the main promoters in the US Congress of the rapprochement with Cuba and, in particular, of a bill that would eliminate travel restrictions to the island for US citizens.President Donald Trump’s administration has imposed new limitations on the travel of US citizens to Cuba, a country which Americans cannot visit as tourists due to Washington’s financial embargo.During their meeting, Rodriguez thanked Flake and the Google executive for their interest in contributing to the debate in favour of an improvement in bilateral relations.Google has been one of the tech giants that has been interested in moving into the Cuban telecommunications market since former US President Barack Obama launched the thaw in relations, although to date it has had only a very limited presence on the island.Three years ago, the firm offered to broaden internet access in Cuba, which is still far below average international levels, but the proposal never developed into a concrete programme.Flake and Schmidt were accompanied by US charge d’affaires in Cuba, Philip Goldberg, and Brett Perlmutter, the Google CEO’s adviser on Cuba.Cuba and the US reopened their embassies in Washington and Havana in 2015 and signed numerous cooperation accords in security, immigration, education, healthcare and culture, but Trump halted the normalisation process.last_img read more

University research team creates augmented reality sandbox w Video

first_img More information: Project page idav.ucdavis.edu/~okreylos/ResDev/SARndbox/ What’s even cooler is the fact that the software used to create the simulations is all available under a GNU public license agreement, which means most any school, museum or other teaching program could build a similar system at very little cost. With such a system, students can gain a deeper understanding of how land and water systems interact and see for themselves how changes to topography over time cause changes in the environment in a much more hands-on fashion than when building static models out of sand, dirt or clay. Pico projector used in eye based video gaming system Explore further © 2012 Phys.Org (Phys.org) — Most children at some point in their schooling are taught about the water table and many wind up being tasked with creating a model of some sort to represent how it all works. Some use clay, but many more likely use sand, as it’s far easier and faster than most anything else. Now researchers at UC Davis have taken that model to new extremes by building a sandbox system that is capable of automatically adding augmented reality real-time coloring to the sand to indicate altitude and moving water as changes are made to the terrain with a hand or small tool.center_img Citation: University research team creates augmented reality sandbox (w/ Video) (2012, May 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-05-university-team-augmented-reality-sandbox.html The project is part of the University’s Keck Center for Active Visualization in the Earth Sciences (funded by a National Science Foundation grant) and was started as a means of building an educational system for children to help kids better visualize how land and water systems work. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. To make the sandbox, the team combined a Kinect 3D camera, a digital projector and simulation software running on a computer and of course, an ordinary sandbox raised up on four legs for optimal viewing.The system works by first collecting images of the sandbox from above using the Kinect camera, at thirty frames per second, as a demonstrator (or student) changes the landscape below in the sandbox. Information from the camera is fed to a computer running the simulation software (Vrui VR development toolkit). The software generates different colors to represent different elevation levels in a virtual topological map. It also uses a set of Saint-Venant shallow water equations to create realistic looking water movement. Both are then projected down onto the sandbox in real time, giving the appearance of reacting to changes made by a person creating hills, valleys, rivers, streams and lakes in the sand. The result is nearly instant color coding of elevation topography and the instigation of virtual water into the modeled waterways.last_img read more