OBITUARY Donald Stephen Tucker 87

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Donald Stephen Tucker, age 87, a long-time resident of Wilmington, passed away peacefully with his wife Marguerite at his side on January 19, 2019.Donald was born in Worcester, MA on March 8, 1931; he was the dear son of the late Edward and Agnes Tucker. Donald was raised in Worcester; he attended Upsala Street School in Worcester, Clarke School in Northampton, and Worcester Trade High School in Worcester.Donald was an exceptional athlete in basketball and baseball. He was inducted into the New England Athletic Association of the Deaf Basketball Hall of Fame in 1982.In 1954, Donald married the “love of his life” Marguerite (Beauregard) Tucker; the couple moved to Worcester, Springfield, Agawam, and then Wilmington (1964) where they raised their family. Donald was a very devoted and loving husband, father and grandfather.Donald was known to be a man of great faith and wisdom; he was a member of St. Thomas of Villanova Church in Wilmington and Sacred Heart Church in Newton for many years.Donald was also a hard worker and a life-long wood patternmaker. Donald was creative, artistic and articulate about his work. In later years, he owned his own pattern shop in his garage.Donald was always helping others and was pro-active in his causes; he was one of the co-founders of the Massachusetts State Association of the Deaf and was their first secretary/treasurer. He volunteered at the New England Homes for the Deaf in Danvers, the Learning Center in Framingham and in later years was a part-time DeafBlind provider.Donald will be fondly remembered for his wonderful sense of humor, his easy-going personality and for his love of America and its principles of freedom.Donald was a great guy who would do anything to help anyone; he loved his family and friends unconditionally and with all his heart. Donald will forever be missed by those who knew and loved him.Donald was the beloved husband of Marguerite I. (Beauregard) Tucker of Wilmington, devoted father of Stephen G. Tucker of Wilmington, James E. Tucker of Middletown, MD and Maryjean Tucker of Swampscott. Loving grandfather of Bradford Tucker of Baltimore, MD and Claire Tucker of St. Paul, MN. Cherished son of the late Edward J. and Agnes (Mara) Tucker, dear brother of the late Agnes (Tucker) McGrath & her late husband Paul, the late Jean (Tucker) Kravsow & her late husband Irving, the late Edward Tucker, and Robert Tucker of Vernon, CT & his late wife Madeline Tucker. Donald was also survived by many nieces, nephews, and friends.Family and friends will gather at the Nichols Funeral Home, 187 Middlesex Ave. (Rte. 62), Wilmington, MA on Friday, January 25th for Visitation from 10:00-11:45 a.m. followed by a Mass of Christian Burial in St. Thomas of Villanova Church, 126 Middlesex Ave., Wilmington, MA. Interment will follow in Wildwood Cemetery, Wilmington, MA.In lieu of flowers, donations in Donald’s memory may be made to Maryland School for the Deaf Foundation, P. O. Box 636, Frederick, MD 21705, msd-foundation.org or to the New England Homes for the Deaf, 154 Water St., Danvers, MA 01923, nehd.org.Donald Tucker(NOTE: The above obituary is from Nichols Funeral Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: Raymond J. Spahl, 86In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Donald R. Donahue, 80In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: James Thayer Hastings, 84In “Obituaries”last_img read more

Cuba president welcomes US senator Google CEO

first_imgCuban President Miguel Diaz-Canel. Photo: ReutersCuban president Miguel Diaz-Canel welcomed US republican senator Jeff Flake and Google CEO Eric Schmidt to the island country.During their meeting on Monday, Diaz-Canel and the US visitors exchanged views on the state of bilateral relations and possible areas of cooperation and “mutual interest”, reports Efe news.Flake, who has visited Cuba several times, the most recent trip being in January, is one of the main promoters in the US Congress of the rapprochement with Cuba and, in particular, of a bill that would eliminate travel restrictions to the island for US citizens.President Donald Trump’s administration has imposed new limitations on the travel of US citizens to Cuba, a country which Americans cannot visit as tourists due to Washington’s financial embargo.During their meeting, Rodriguez thanked Flake and the Google executive for their interest in contributing to the debate in favour of an improvement in bilateral relations.Google has been one of the tech giants that has been interested in moving into the Cuban telecommunications market since former US President Barack Obama launched the thaw in relations, although to date it has had only a very limited presence on the island.Three years ago, the firm offered to broaden internet access in Cuba, which is still far below average international levels, but the proposal never developed into a concrete programme.Flake and Schmidt were accompanied by US charge d’affaires in Cuba, Philip Goldberg, and Brett Perlmutter, the Google CEO’s adviser on Cuba.Cuba and the US reopened their embassies in Washington and Havana in 2015 and signed numerous cooperation accords in security, immigration, education, healthcare and culture, but Trump halted the normalisation process.last_img read more

After Controversy Over Condolence Calls Can Trump And The White House Refocus

first_img Share People get what is going on! https://t.co/Pdg7VqQv6M— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 21, 2017And Trump’s Twitter fingers were tested again Monday morning after Myeshia Johnson, the widow of Army Sgt. La David Johnson, who was one of the four killed in Niger, spoke out.The president “said that ‘he knew what he signed up for, but it hurts anyways,’” Johnson recounted on ABC’s Good Morning America. “It made me cry, because I was very angry at the tone of his voice and couldn’t remember my husband’s name.”Trump then said he had her husband’s name on a report in front of him, Johnson said, describing Trump as “stumbling on my husband’s name. That’s what hurt me most. He’s out there fighting for our country, why can’t you remember his name? … He was an awesome soldier.”She described herself as “very, very upset and hurt. It made me cry even worse.”Trump wasted no time defending his handling of the call and his use of Sgt. Johnson’s name, tweeting shortly after the interview:I had a very respectful conversation with the widow of Sgt. La David Johnson, and spoke his name from beginning, without hesitation!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 23, 2017Johnson’s funeral was Saturday. The interview and Trump’s response threaten to extend the controversy — which has been uncomfortable to see laid bare — for another week.Trump can’t seem to let it go, even as the controversy descended into one about race — again during this presidency — by the end of last week.Here was the way Midwin Charles, writing for Essence magazine, framed it Friday, for example:“At a time when Black women bury their sons and daughters as a result of gun violence, police brutality and service to this country, the lack of respect from this president is unbearable. Worse, he sets a dangerous precedent on how Black women should be perceived and treated in America.”Trump has the opportunity to refocus this week, as Panetta suggests is necessary, on other subjects important to him and the country — like the budget and a tax overhaul with a trip to Capitol Hill the president has set for Tuesday.There’s also the opioid epidemic; he’s said he’ll formally designate it a national emergency this week, although much remains unclear about the details of what that will mean.Trump heads to Capitol Hill to lobby Republicans, but can he move the ball on policy?NPR’s Susan Davis, congressional correspondent, writes:President Trump heads to Capitol Hill Tuesday to meet with Senate Republicans at their private weekly lunch. It is the first time Trump will attend the weekly lunch as president. Republicans are expected to plan out their fall agenda, with only seven legislative weeks remaining and a to-list that is growing.Republicans are sensitive to the fact that they haven’t delivered much in the way of legislative victories in the first year of full GOP control of Washington. While the president has foisted on to lawmakers a number of unanticipated items, like immigration legislation affecting so-called DREAMers and tougher sanctions on Iran, there is nothing more important to the GOP agenda than passing tax legislation before the end of the year.Republicans largely believe that enacting sweeping tax cuts for American businesses and families will inoculate the party from a feared backlash in the 2018 midterm elections over the party’s failures to make good on its promise to dismantle the Affordable Care Act.The president’s efforts to address the opioid crisis have come up short so far. Is anything substantively different with his declaration of a “national emergency”?NPR’s Tamara Keith, White House correspondent, who has covered the opioid crisis extensively, notes:President Trump says this week he will declare the opioid epidemic a national emergency. If he actually does it, Trump will be following through on a pledge he made more than two months ago.On Aug. 10, the president said, “This is a national emergency, and we are drawing documents now.” But there has been little sign since that the administration really was drawing up the documents.According to the latest numbers, nearly 150 Americans are dying each day from drug overdoses, the majority of those from heroin, fentanyl and other opioids.“My guess is, we’re going to see deaths go up than go down. I think we’re on the wrong side of curve here,” New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie recently said. He’s chairman of President Trump’s opioid commission, which is set to release a final set of recommendations Nov. 1.But, it is such a significant crisis that on July 31 the commission issued an interim report with a recommendation it described as urgent: that the president declare a national emergency, to free up resources and bring increased attention to something that every three weeks is killing as many people as died on Sept. 11.“Your declaration would empower your cabinet to take bold steps and would force Congress to focus on funding and empowering the Executive Branch even further to deal with this loss of life,” the commission report noted. “You, Mr. President, are the only person who can bring this type of intensity to the emergency and we believe you have the will to do so and to do so immediately.”Tackling the opioid crisis was a key Trump campaign promise. The question this week is whether he will follow through with action.Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Trump has an opportunity to refocus on the military with a Medal of Honor ceremony and to congressional priorities as he heads to Capitol Hill Tuesday.Updated Monday, Oct. 23 at 9:08 a.m. ETWhen backed into a corner, President Trump digs in and fights back.It’s what he’s done as president, it’s what he did as a candidate and it’s what he did as a businessman.Just go listen to NPR’s Embedded podcast and a recent episode about Trump’s fight with Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif., over things as petty as a flagpole at his golf course, putting hedges in front of houses he thought were ugly and the name of a road. He wanted his name on it.He had been greeted as something of a conquering hero in that town. But the relationship soured after lawsuits and threats. So much so that the Republican town that voted for John McCain in 2008 and Mitt Romney in 2012 went for Hillary Clinton in 2016.“I think the president has a bad habit when he’s asked a question that he is uncomfortable with or can’t quite come up with the right answer — he usually tries to reach out for scapegoats,” Leon Panetta, former defense secretary under President Obama and chief of staff to Bill Clinton, told NPR’s All Things Considered, “and the first scapegoat this president seems to always turn to is President Obama.“And when he talked about him not making calls that was a terrible mistake. And what bothers me is that it detracts from the main focus here, and the main focus has to be on the brave and courageous individuals that are willing to go out there and fight and die for America, and their families. There is some comfort here for all of this dispute, that maybe America again will take the time to remember that there are young men and women in uniform that are fighting and dying for this country. That’s something sometimes we tend to forget.”Part of the problem for Americans is the disconnect Panetta highlights between the military and the rest of society. In 1945, just before the end of World War II, there were 12 million active servicemembers. Now, there are just over a million or so.“They’re the best 1 percent this country produces,” White House Chief of Staff John Kelly said Thursday in his defense of President Trump in the White House briefing room.It’s actually less than 1 percent. That number in 1945 represented roughly 9 percent of the country’s total population. Now, the number of active-duty servicemembers is only about 0.4 percent of the population.“Most of you, as Americans, don’t know them,” Kelly continued. “Many of you don’t know anyone that knows any one of them.”Americans are far less engaged in the debate over worldwide American missions than they likely would be if they had a daughter or son or neighbor in the fight. That has to have an effect on American society and policymaking.Trump will look to highlight that sacrifice at a Medal of Honor ceremony at the White House Monday. He will honor retired Army Captain Gary M. Rose, who was a medic during Vietnam and saved a helicopter full of soldiers after it was shot down.But there are questions as to whether Trump can move on and keep his focus on where staff like Kelly would like it to be.Trump, for example, has shown no signs of wanting to move on from the fight with a Democratic congresswoman. Rep. Frederica Wilson of Florida revealed details of a conversation Trump had with a widow of one of the soldiers killed in Niger.I hope the Fake News Media keeps talking about Wacky Congresswoman Wilson in that she, as a representative, is killing the Democrat Party!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 21, 2017last_img read more

David Copperfield Voices Support For MeToo After Accusation

first_imgPhoto via Twitter @C64_endingsCopperfield has declared his support for the Me Too movement in a lengthy statement online in the wake of new allegations of misconduct.Magician David Copperfield has declared his support for the Me Too movement in a lengthy statement online in the wake of an allegation of sexual misconduct.Copperfield says in a Twitter post Wednesday that he has been falsely accused in the past, and that even as he must “weather another storm, I want the movement to continue to flourish.”pic.twitter.com/1LjIBYa9rP— David Copperfield (@D_Copperfield) January 24, 2018The entertainment news site TheWrap.com published accounts this week from a woman who claims Copperfield drugged and assaulted her decades ago when she was a 17-year-old aspiring model.Copperfield’s statement makes reference to a since-debunked allegation of sexual misconduct made against him by a different woman in 2007. She was later charged with prostitution and making false claims of sexual abuse by another man.He says he initially did not want to draw attention to that previous case because “false accusers can negatively impact the believability of others and are a true disservice to those who have been victims of sexual misconduct.”The 61-year-old Copperfield does not address the new accusations directly, but says in his statement to “always listen, and consider everything carefully, but please for everyone’s sake don’t rush to judgment.”David Copperfield Accused of Drugging, Assaulting 17-Year-Old Model in 1988 https://t.co/1I5dQRPzOi pic.twitter.com/qqRRGNWxv2— TheWrap (@TheWrap) January 25, 2018 Sharelast_img read more

Lynching Memorial and Museum in Alabama Draw Crowds Tears

first_imgBy BETH J. HARPAZ, AP Travel EditorTears and expressions of grief met the opening of the nation’s first memorial to the victims of lynching April 26 in Alabama.Hundreds lined up in the rain to get a first look at the memorial and museum in Montgomery.The National Memorial for Peace and Justice commemorates 4,400 Black people who were slain in lynchings and other racial killings between 1877 and 1950. Their names, where known, are engraved on 800 dark, rectangular steel columns, one for each U.S. county where lynchings occurred.This photo shows a bronze statue called “Raise Up,” part of the display at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, a new memorial to honor thousands of people killed in lynchings, launched April 26 in Montgomery, Ala. The memorial and an accompanying museum that open this week in Montgomery are a project of the nonprofit Equal Justice Initiative, a legal advocacy group in Montgomery. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)A related museum, called The Legacy Museum: From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration, is opening in Montgomery.Many visitors shed tears and stared intently at the commemorative columns, many of which are suspended in the air from above.Toni Battle drove from San Francisco to attend. “I’m a descendant of three lynching victims,” Battle said, her face wet with tears. “I wanted to come and honor them and also those in my family that couldn’t be here.”Ava DuVernay, the Oscar-nominated film director, told several thousand people at a conference marking the memorial launch to “to be evangelists and say what you saw and what you experienced here. … Every American who believes in justice and dignity must come here … Don’t just leave feeling like, ‘That was amazing. I cried.’ … Go out and tell what you saw.”As for her own reaction, DuVernay said: “This place has scratched a scab. It’s really open for me right now.”Angel Smith Dixon, who is biracial, came from Lawrenceville, Ga., to see the memorial.“We’re publicly grieving this atrocity for the first time as a nation. … You can’t grieve something you can’t see, something you don’t acknowledge. Part of the healing process, the first step is to acknowledge it.”Part of a statue depicting chained people is on display at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, a new memorial to honor thousands of people killed in racist lynchings. The national memorial aims to teach about America’s past in hope of promoting understanding and healing. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)The Rev. Jesse Jackson, a longtime civil rights activist, told reporters after visiting the memorial that it would help to dispel America’s silence on lynching.“Whites wouldn’t talk about it because of shame. Blacks wouldn’t talk about it because of fear,” he said.The crowd included White and Black visitors. Mary Ann Braubach, who is White, came from Los Angeles to attend. “As an American, I feel this is a past we have to confront,” she said as she choked back tears.DuVernay, Jackson, playwright Anna Deavere Smith, the singing group Sweet Honey in the Rock, Congressman John Lewis and other activists and artists spoke and performed at an opening ceremony Thursday night that was by turns somber and celebratory.Among those introduced and cheered with standing ovations were activists from the 1950s Montgomery bus boycott, Freedom Rider Bernard Lafayette, and one of the original Little Rock Nine, Elizabeth Eckford.“There are forces in America today trying to take us back,” Lewis said, adding, “We’re not going back. We’re going forward with this museum.”Singer Patti Labelle ended the evening with a soulful rendition of “A Change is Gonna Come.”Other launch events include a “Peace and Justice Summit” featuring celebrities and activists like Marian Wright Edelman and Gloria Steinem in addition to DuVernay.The summit, museum and memorial are projects of the Equal Justice Initiative, a Montgomery-based legal advocacy group founded by attorney Bryan Stevenson. Stevenson won a MacArthur “genius” award for his human rights work.The group bills the project as “the nation’s first memorial dedicated to the legacy of enslaved black people, people terrorized by lynching, African Americans humiliated by racial segregation and Jim Crow, and people of color burdened with contemporary presumptions of guilt and police violence.”Several thousand people gave Stevenson a two-minute standing ovation at a morning session of the Peace and Justice Summit. Later in the day, Edelman, founder of the Children’s Defense Fund, urged the audience to continue their activism beyond the day’s events on issues like ending child poverty and gun violence: “Don’t come here and celebrate the museum … when we’re letting things happen on an even greater scale.”last_img read more