Janelle Monáe Drops Two New Singles Announces New Album

first_imgNETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO Jan 28, 2018 – 10:52 pm Janelle Monaé’s “Time’s Up” Speech News Janelle Monáe Drops Two New Singles, Announces New Album Email Twitter Janelle Monáe Drops Singles From ‘Dirty Computer’ janelle-mon%C3%A1e-drops-two-new-singles-announces-new-albumcenter_img While Monáe has stayed busy over the past five years with music and acting, Dirty Computer is her first full-length album since 2013’s The Electric Lady. If these first two singles are any indication, Monáe will continue to make her statement loud and proud well into 2018 and beyond.Catching Up On Music News Powered By The Recording Academy Just Got Easier. Have A Google Home Device? “Talk To GRAMMYs”Read more Continuing her year of compelling statements, in “Django Jane” Monáe takes on issues of sexism and racism head-on, reading a rap-heavy riot act at power symbols while situated on a royal throne and at the head of the table. Just as visually striking, “Make Me Feel” presents a more sultry, seductive vibe, showing off Monáe’s acting chops overtop a funky, melodic dance club banger. Facebook The GRAMMY-nominated artist returns with not one, but two bold new songs and striking videos, plus a release date for her new full-length LPNate HertweckGRAMMYs Feb 22, 2018 – 3:34 pm Less than one month after her unforgettable and empowering “Time’s Up” speech at the 60th GRAMMY Awards, Janelle Monáe released two new songs on Feb. 22, complete with accompanying videos, and announced the release date for her upcoming fourth album, Dirty Computer, out April 27.last_img read more

Amazon granted patent for surveillance drones service

first_imgA new patent shows how drones can keep an eye out on a home while making deliveries.  CNET For years, Amazon has shown off how it’ll use drones to deliver items to customers, and it’s even developed a super-quiet drone for neighborhood deliveries. The company has a new patent that’ll give these flying robots a second use: surveillance. Amazon received a patent for what it calls “Image creation using geo-fence data” from the US Patent and Trademark Office in early June. The application explains that unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), or drones, could be used to provide a secondary service of checking on an individual’s property while the robots are out doing deliveries.Surveillance drones patent figureAn image from the Amazon patent shows how drones will deliver and provide surveillance. US Patent and Trademark Office/Amazon As part of this service, customers can receive images or videos from the drones overlooking the property. UAVs would only be allowed to record the property of the individuals who consented and not those of their neighbors. “We take customer privacy very seriously,” John Tagle, senior PR manager for Amazon, said in an email Friday. “Some reports have suggested that this technology would spy or gather data on homes without authorization — to be clear, that’s not what the patent says. The patent clearly states that it would be an opt-in service available to customers who authorize monitoring of their home.”One company you might think would be worried about this is Sunflower Labs, a startup developing home security drones. But Chief Executive Alex Pachikov says he’s happy with Amazon’s patent.”I am actually very excited to see this,” Pachikov said. “We’ve long believed that drones are ideally suited for security, and while Amazon’s approach is different from ours, we are happy to see this market validated.”Like many patents granted to tech companies, there’s no telling if this drone security service will actually see the light of day. So far, Amazon’s plans for drones and autonomous vehicles are for deliveries sometime in the future. CNET reporter Stephen Shankland contributed to this report.Originally published June 21, 7:50 a.m. PT.Update, 9:16 a.m. PT: Adds Amazon comment. Update, June 23: Adds comment from Sunflower Labs. Share your voice Tags Comments 5 Patents Amazon Drones Smart Home Security Security Cameraslast_img read more

Pentagon rubbishes NASA claim on ASAT test says India has concerns over

first_img Close IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:00/2:20Loaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-2:20?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading … Testing the ASAT today, India showed its military might in space as it became the 4th country to become a part of the elite space power club.Representative imageFor the second time in a week, Pentagon has come out strongly in support of India’s Anti-Satellite (A-SAT) missile test saying that Mission Shakti was imperative considering the threat from space. Pentagon had earlier rubbished the claims of National Aeronautical Space Agency (NASA) of A-SAT test being terrible and disturbing the space order. It was claimed that the test created 400 odd pieces of orbital debris and posed a danger to the International Space Station (ISS).On March 27, when Prime Minister Narendra Modi had announced the launch of the ground to space missile that destroyed a satellite, the nation had joined the elite group of space powers that include the United States, China and Russia.US Strategic Command Commander General John E Hyten told members of the powerful Senate Armed Services Committee on Thursday that the key points from India’s A-SAT test were that India did the test to defend itself from the threats in space. Gen. Hyten was responding to the US Senator’s queries on why India conducted the ASA-T test.”The first lesson from the Indian ASAT is just the simple question of why did they do that. And the answer should be, I think to all the committee looking at it, is that they did that because they are concerned about threats to their nation from space,” he said.The US Senators raised the alarm after NASA chief Jim Bridenstine said that the test was a “terrible thing” that endangered the ISS and created 40 pieces of orbital debris. The premier space agency claimed that it had tracked nearly 60 orbital debris and that 24 were going above the apogee of ISS.Pentagon, standing firmly in support of India, said that such incidences had happened in the past as well when China sent 100,000 pieces of debris in 2007 during its anti-satellite test.In 2009, a satellite collision took place between the US and an old Russian satellite that also resulted in debris in the space.Gen. Hyten observed that in such challenging times when four countries have acquired A-SAT capabilities, there was a dire need to introduce safe environmental norms in the space. He advocated for the development of some kind of international norms of behaviour in space.”And where those norms of behaviour should begin, from my opinion, is with debris, because as the combatant commander responsible for space today, I don’t want more debris,” he added.center_img ‘Terrible, terrible thing’, created 400 pieces of debris: NASA Chief on India’s ASAT testlast_img read more