Wrong forum Chris Gayle

first_imgWhat is the problem with Christopher Henry Gayle that is causing this continuous display of his manhood and sexuality in the public space?The T20 cricket batting superhero had another on-air amorous approach aimed at a female journalist conducting a post-performance interview during a game in the Australian Big Bash League (BBL).It was only last year, on Antigua home soil, that Big Chris committed what Foster’s Fairplay assessed then and still now, as a trend towards vulgarity.On that occasion, in a pre-game interview, the former West Indies captain was reported to have been asked by a female interviewer: “How does the pitch feel so far in terms of the training (and) the weather”?The response was: “Well, I haven’t touched yours yet, so I don’t know how it feels.”The question in this columnist’s view did not indicate cricket savvy, but Gayle put the query on a sexist plane.Following the story from Down Under, what is interesting is a comment by a Jamaican sports journalist considered, in this corner, to be ‘from the top drawer’.FOOT-IN-MOUTH DISEASENoted for his incisive analysis, after listening to excerpts from the recent interview with Gayle and the woman, he made the point: “I thought Gayle had learnt his lesson.”No such luck, Leighton. There is no stopping the loose talk coming from the swashbuckling opening batsman, as he seems to be stuck in the groove of ‘putting his foot in his mouth’ on these occasions.This time, his 41 off 15 balls was being recounted when what he chose to highlight was his attraction to the lady’s eyes and proceeded to issue an invitation on set for the woman to “have a drink” later.The “Do not blush, Baby” followed.Subsequently, the BBL boss, obviously and justifiably incensed, has issued sanctions against our boy, Chris. First up, he will no longer be featured in the coverage of the games. His wearing of on-field microphones to facilitate comments during the fast-paced spectacle is now denied. Added to this, the now-beleaguered entertainer has been docked US$7,200 (AUS$10,000.)In response to the many negative remarks from all over, there have been shouts of “Overkill!”, “Killing an ant with a hammer!” and the like. The view expressed there is that Gayle’s flirtatious foray did not deserve such adverse comment.In general, it is also the talk that the matter has been “blown out of proportion”. Some have responded to the most popular comment, which is that the approach was “inappropriate”.Another famed radio talk show host and academic has said that the measure of that description is dependent on how acceptable it was to the lady in question, Mel McLaughlin.Also, it has been mentioned that she was made to feel “uncomfortable”, while carrying out the requirements of her job.culture-dependent viewOn the matter of discomfort, the only opinion in the public space has not, to this columnist’s knowledge, come from the lady herself, but rather from what she was alleged to have said to her superior. Foster’s Fairplay is in total disagreement with the highly respected talk show host on the matter of the lady’s acceptability or not. That is immaterial in this corner. Depending on culture, socialisation, or plain lack of decency on the part of the target, the foulest language in requesting sexual attention can find favour in certain quarters but can be rejected, as it should be, in others.This columnist, in his youthful days, trying to adhere to lessons taught, lost many a battle, failing to land the booty, while the vulgar approach won the hand, and whatever else was on offer from the female. Unacceptability is a legitimate call, regardless of its source.As for the suggestion that the story has received an overabundance of mileage, this is how journalists eat, drink, and enjoy life’s blessings. Put a little one-Test medium pacer in the superstar’s position, the hue and cry would be considerably less – if heard at all.The so-called extra publicity comes from the elevated territory, and Gayle and his supporters must be aware of this as they line up in his support.Foster’s Fairplay sums up the varied arguments and counter arguments: It was the wrong forum for the comment.Take the thought elsewhere, Chris.last_img read more

Fernandes ‘proud’ after QPR’s defeat against Wolves

first_imgTony Fernandes took to Twitter after QPR’s home defeat against Wolves, insisting that the players could be proud of their efforts.Rangers were beaten 2-1 at Loftus Road, where James Perch was sent off during the first half.The result means Rangers have lost two of their three matches since Ian Holloway’s return as manager, but the co-chairman remains positive.Was always going to be hard with 10 men but we played with real heart and never gave in and could have nicked a point . Proud of the boys— Tony Fernandes (@tonyfernandes) December 1, 2016   Ads by Revcontent Trending Articles Urologists: Men, Forget the Blue Pill! This “Destroys” ED x ‘Genius Pill’ Used By Rich Americans Now Available In Netherlands! x Men, You Don’t Need the Blue Pill if You Do This x What She Did to Lose Weight Stuns Doctors: Do This Daily Before Bed! x One Cup of This (Before Bed) Burns Belly Fat Like Crazy! x Drink This Before Bed, Watch Your Body Fat Melt Like Crazy x Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Spotlight on words at Arts Fest

first_imgTwenty-six-year-old Thando Mgqolozanamade his literary debut at this year’sfestival with his novel, A man; who is nota man. Mgqolozana’s work challenges thepractices of male circumcision in theXhosa culture.Khanyi MagubaneFind out more about using MediaClubSouthAfrica.com materialWriters took to the streets in Grahamstown on 7 July as part of Wordfest, the literary programme at the National Arts Festival that seeks to highlight the need for the proper development of a reading culture in South Africa.The 200 writers who gathered outside the Wordfest venue at Rhodes University in the town were also there to protest against the poor state of reading levels in South Africa.The initiative was supported by a number of prominent people in the literary programme, including the convener of Wordfest and professor of poetry at Rhodes University Chris Mann, and Sports, Recreation, Arts and Culture MEC Xoliswa Tom, who launched event.This year’s programme will include lectures from academics, readings from authors, book launches and poetry recitals.The book chain store Exclusive Books has also set up a small shop at the venue.The opening keynote address was delivered by award-winning author Mandla Langa, whose latest novel, Colours of the Chameleon, recently won the Commonwealth Prize for Literature in the Africa region.Langa spoke about the struggles that South Africans have had to overcome, focusing specifically on his own childhood, growing up in the township of Umlazi in KwaZulu-Natal province. As a child he was unaware that the Bantu education, as it was referred to during apartheid, he was receiving was of a much lower standard than that of white students in the country.But, despite the social difficulties of growing up in a township, Langa recalls how he immersed himself in books and reading.His love of reading exposed him to poets and authors within his own community. He was groomed by late legendary South African poet Mafika Gwala. He recalled how seeing his first published poem in a literary journal moved him.“When, some years later, one of my poems was published in a magazine, Ophir, edited by Peter Horn and Robert MacNamara, I was over the moon.“I remember going around, getting free drinks in shebeens [home taverns], this boy who’s got a poem published in a real magazine, alongside names of white people, no less. That’s when, to put it mildly, my troubles started. I had found a role that would define me.”But Langa’s elation didn’t last after enrolling in the University of Fort Hare’s English programme.According to Langa, his English lecturer frequently and openly told him, and his fellow black students, that they would never pass “his English”. This did not deter Langa, who went on to finish his degree.Going into exile in the late 1970s, he lived in various countries including Nigeria. During a theatre production based on the infamous 16 June 1976 Soweto uprising, by students from the University of Ibadan, Langa was painfully reminded of his homesickness and the conflicts in his home country.“I remember that, as soon as the students’ performance got to the enactment of the Hector Pieterson shooting, the soldier standing next to me, who was a big man, started weeping uncontrollably.“I also wept. I wept for my country, for the fact that we were thousands of miles from home. In those years it was difficult to think of the possibility of apartheid’s end.”Langa’s speech centred on the need for South Africans to move forward, not to be stuck in one particular era, but also not to forget what had happened in South Africa at the time. He used the metaphor of walking, which he says also inspired former president Nelson Mandela’s autobiography, Long Walk to Freedom.“Nelson Mandela’s journey in Long Walk to Freedom mirrors the efforts to raise up black American slaves through education by Booker T Washington, who wrote Up From Slavery, another form of walking – it’s less about the physical activity of walking than about attitude; an attitude that, granted, derives its inspiration from walking.”Breaking the silenceAlso launched at the festival was the controversial book by first-time writer, 26-year-old Thando Mgqolozana. His novel, A man; who is not a man, published by the University of KwaZulu-Natal, challenges the practices of male circumcision in the Xhosa culture.During his opening address, the young Eastern Cape writer spoke about his own experience with circumcision. He said that it is difficult for him to see what was once a proud ritual to usher boys into manhood, become a thorny issue veiled in silence in his community.“I felt the need to break the silence and publish this book because the fear is no longer. I wanted to start a debate on this issue, and lift the veil of secrecy around the issue of the death of initiates.”A number of Xhosa traditionalists attended the launch as the topic of male circumcision has long been regarded as an exclusively male issue, and could not be addressed in a public forum including women.Mgqolozana said he was prepared to field tough questions from Xhosa traditionalists, who may have been offended by the book. Instead, he was met with an unexpected amount of support from the audience. He said he was touched by the encouragement from, especially, elder males who, in acknowledging the sacredness of the practice, felt that the writer had taken a leap of faith in openly addressing it.The issue of male circumcision has been a hot topic in the South African media as a number of young men have died due to alleged medical complications. The South African Press Association reported on 7 July 2009 that a 37th Eastern Cape man died after an initiation ritual. The youths, most of them between the ages of 13 and 22, died after undergoing the traditional practice at illegal initiation schools.“You are brave because us man folk don’t talk about such things in front of women folk. But it is good for you to talk about it, because when tradition changes and it results in death, that’s a problem,” said one attendee during the question-and-answer session.“Now is the time for the custom to be transformed. How many deaths must we witness until we do something about it?” asked another attendee.Mgqolozana criticised the House of Traditional Leaders, a body set up by government to deal with traditional issues, whom he says has failed to protect the age-old practice.“They have failed us. The government has tried to come up with legislative laws to try and govern practices around male circumcision. However, the House of the Traditional Leaders has rejected the promulgation of this Act.”Mgqolozana was referring to the Children’s Act number 38 of 2005, which also includes a section on male circumcision.According to the law, males under the age of 16 may not be circumcised, unless:performed for religious purposes in accordance with the practices of the religion concerned and in the manner prescribed, orperformed for medical reasons on the recommendation of a medical practitioner.Mgqolozana says he hopes the book will encourage young and old to open up, as well as integrate women into the conversation, as many mothers are losing their children.“This book doesn’t really have a target audience, but I hope that people who practise male circumcision will read this book.“I’m hoping that the fathers will get my argument, and that the mothers will finally know the secrets of circumcision as they deserve to know what is happening.”The young writer says his mother, though, has been a tough one to convince, “She read the book overnight and she sms’d me the next morning and she said ‘this is really a work of fiction’.”Wordfest will continue at the National Arts Festival until 10 July.Do you have any queries or comments about this article? Email Khanyi Magubane at khanyim@mediaclubsouthafrica.comUseful linksWordfest National Arts Festival University of KwaZulu-Natal presslast_img read more

Google takes world on a tour of Robben Island

first_img24 April 2015As South Africa prepares to celebrate Freedom Day this year, the 21st anniversary of its first democratic elections, the Robben Island Museum and Google have announced the release of the first-­ever Street View imagery of Robben Island, as well as an audio-­visual tour hosted on Google Cultural Institute.A collaboration between Google and the Robben Island Museum to make the Unesco World Heritage site accessible to the world via the internet represented an effort to marry history with the future, the museum said in a statement. Mandela’s 2×2 prison cell. He rolled and unrolled his bedding each night as the majority of space in the tiny cell was taken up by his desk and book shelves. (Image: Google Cultural Institute) Sibongiseni Mkhize, chief executive of the Robben Island Museum, said at the launch that the museum was embracing technology to avoid becoming “irrelevant”. “We are using technology to enhance the story of the island.” He said the educational element of the island would be highlighted with this new partnership.“The reason Robben Island is now a museum is to educate people about the part of South Africa’s heritage that is embodied in the island’s multilayered history. Together with Google we are making this heritage accessible to people all over the world,” he said.Luke McKend, country director for Google South Africa, said that they had launched the project just days ahead of Freedom Day because “Robben Island is a symbol of South Africa’s fight for freedom”.“Once a symbol of the oppressive apartheid regime, Robben Island is now a memorial and a reminder of the human spirit’s irrepressible search for freedom. We hope you’ll take a moment to step back in time to explore and be inspired by the island’s story of hope and humanity,” McKend writes on the official Google blog.It is hoped that the tour will help educate people around the world about the prison colony, where Nelson Mandela was imprisoned by the apartheid regime for nearly two decades. WATCH: Former Robben Island prisoner Vusumsi Mcongo recalls the incident that led to the closure of the lime quarry on the island. The newly launched guided tour of Robben Island includes a virtual visit to Mandela’s prison cell as well as to activist Robert Sobukwe’s house. It uses a combination of Google’s Street View technology, videos of a tour guide (former political prisoner Vusumsi Mcongo) as well as original still images.As part of this project, Google Maps will also develop teaching notes on Robben Island for educators who will be using this interactive tour as an educational tool.Ahmed Kathrada, a veteran of the anti-apartheid struggle, a former inmate and close friend of the late Mandela, welcomed the initiative at the launch on Wednesday.“Not being able to see or interact with children for 20 years was possibly the most difficult thing to endure during my time on the island,” he said. “There’s a poetic justice that children in classrooms all over the world will now be able to visit Robben Island using this technology.” The house on Robert Island where Robert Sobukwe was sentenced to solitary confinement during the 1970s. (Image: Google Cultural Institute) Tourism Minister Derek Hanekom said, “The internet is the world’s most powerful source of information and thanks to Google’s partnership with the Robben Island Museum, more people than ever before have access to this World Heritage Site.“We hope that this initiative not only allows for the world to reflect on South Africa’s struggle for freedom, but also showcase its beauty,” Hanekom said.The Robben Island Museum announced in April that they would be overhauling the ailing user experience on the island. The app and partnership with Google was a step in the overall improvement of the island, the museum said.The Nelson Mandela Centre for Memory also confirmed it would update their Cultural Institute exhibits with new layouts and add Street View panoramas of Robben Island.The Robben Island interactive tour can be accessed on mobile phones, from desktops and from Google’s Cultural Institute, where Robben Island Museum will host five exhibits depicting the history of the island.Download the app from the Google Store SAinfo reporter and news24.comlast_img read more

Samsung Galaxy S8, Galaxy S8+: Full specs, top features, India price and everything you need to know

first_imgSamsung launched the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ in India on Wednesday. The Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ mark a fresh start for Samsung after the disaster that was the Galaxy Note 7. Samsung builds some beautiful phones. The Note 7 was a beautiful phone. The Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ are also very beautiful phones. But, unlike the Note 7, the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ have a lot of added responsibility on their shoulders. It won’t be easy. Still, you can’t take away the fact that the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ look like pretty amazing phones, at least for now.The new Galaxy S phones from Samsung are an evolved lot that have plenty under the hood to make one excited. They have a fancy new edge-to-edge design, lots of horsepower courtesy a next-generation mobile processor, improved cameras and smart AI tricks. The new Galaxy S phones also have as many as three modes of biometric authentication, and a feature that lets you connect these phones to a monitor the way Microsoft’s Windows Continuum does. We take a closer look.Specifications:Processor: The Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ available in India will be powered by a 2.3GHz octa-core Exynos 8895 processor clubbed with Mali-G71 MP20 GPU. The US version of the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ come with a Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 processor inside.RAM: Both the phones come with 4GB of RAM.Internal storage: Both the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ come with 64GB of internal memory which is expandable by up to 256GB via a micro-SD card.advertisementScreen: The Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ come with what Samsung calls as an Infinity display. Both the phones boast of an edge-to-edge screen and an unusual 18.5:9 aspect ratio instead of a regular 16:9. While the Galaxy S8 is a 5.8-inch phone, the Galaxy S8+ has a 6.2-inch screen. Both the phones have a 2960×1440 pixel (WQHD+) resolution and Super AMOLED panels. The Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ also come with Samsung’s trademark always-on functionality.Rear camera: Both the phones come with a 12-megapixel (Dual Pixel) rear camera with f/1.7 aperture and optical image stabilisation. While the rear camera is largely the same as the one in last year’s Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge, Samsung has made software tweaks to enhance post-processing that should result in slightly better results. At the same time, the camera app now houses a barrage of fancy new animations to add AR effects to photos.Front camera: On the front, the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ sport an 8-megapixel camera with autofocus.Also Read: Samsung Galaxy S8, Galaxy S8+ launched in India, price starts at Rs 57,900 Software: Both the phones run Android Nougat-based TouchWiz UI or more precisely Samsung Experience UX.Battery: While the Galaxy S8 has a 3,000mAh battery, the Galaxy S8+ has a larger 3,500mAh battery inside. Both the phones support fast and wireless charging.Special features:– Both the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+, from the onset, are exact replicas of each other. The Galaxy S8+ is simply a larger Galaxy S8 with a bigger battery. Samsung isn’t launching a new Edge phone this year, because probably, both its new Galaxy S phones have just the right amount of curves and Edge-functionality built right into them. There was no need for a stand-alone curved-display phone this year round.– Both the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ still boast of a glass and metal body, but unlike their predecessor phones, Samsung’s 2017 flagships have near bezel-less screens. These have Corning Gorilla Glass 5 on both the front as well as on the back.– The front, in the case of the Galaxy S8 and S8+, is clean and without any buttons. Contrary to reports, the Galaxy S8 and S8+ phones do have a front-mounted home button, only that it is software-based now. So are the back and recent keys. While the home button is pressure sensitive — and gives haptic feedback when pressed something on the lines of Apple’s Force Touch — it is also now possible to edit and re-position the back and recent keys. Both the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ also come with a dedicated Bixby button.– Bixby is Samsung’s take on Apple’s Siri and Google’s Assistant. It responds to both touch and voice and has the ability to translate as many as 52 languages. Apple’s Siri, for your reference, maxes out at 30. “At launch, Bixby’s Voice function will integrate with several Samsung native apps and features including Camera, Contacts, Gallery, Messages and Settings, with the plan to expand its capabilities to include more Samsung and third-party apps in the near future,” Samsung said. Bixby, for instance, can be used to search for images. Also, it can be used to get details about nearby places. There’s a catch however, in that, it supports only US English and Korean languages for now. Also, Bixby doesn’t support voice commands yet.advertisement– The Galaxy S8 and the S8+ have a rear-mounted fingerprint scanner that lies adjacent to the camera module. In addition, Samsung’s new Galaxy S-phones also come with an iris scanner and facial recognition for added security. Samsung Knox and Samsung Pay are also built-in.– Just like their predecessor phones, the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ are IP68-certified for water and dust resistance.– Samsung has also announced a dock and a feature called DeX that is very similar to Microsft’s Windows Continuum. “Samsung DeX is a unique solution that transforms your smartphone into a desktop by providing a secure desktop-like experience. With Samsung DeX, users can easily display and edit data from their phone, making working from a smartphone faster and smarter,” the company said.India price and availability: The Samsung Galaxy S8 and S8+ will be available for buying starting from May 5 — with pre-orders beginning from today — both online and offline in as many as five colours: Midnight Black, Orchid Grey, Arctic Silver, Coral Blue and Maple Gold. Both the phones will ship with AKG-tuned headphones. While the Galaxy S8 has been priced at Rs 57,900 the Galaxy S8+ will cost buyers Rs 64,900.last_img read more

College Spun’s Staff Picks For Week 7 Of The 2015 Season

first_imgCollege Spun's picks for week 7 of the 2015 CFB season.college spun staff picks week 7Week six of the college football season produced a few big upsets, like Washington over USC and Texas over Oklahoma, along with a few almost-upsets, like Michigan State vs. Rutgers, TCU vs. Kansas State and Florida State vs. Miami (FL). Week seven is shaping up to be the most interesting of the season thus far, however.This week, we’ve got UCLA vs. Stanford, Michigan vs. Michigan State, Alabama vs. Texas A&M, Florida vs. LSU and USC vs. Notre Dame. Currently, Matt Hladik and Dustin Tackett hold a slim lead over the field in our weekly competition. Here are our picks for this weekend’s games:staff picks week 7 1staff picks week 7 2staff picks week 7 3Who do you have?last_img

Drug Court Changing Lives

first_imgIn January 2010 Monica Jones (not her real name) was arrested by the police for possession of marijuana. She had just purchased $400 worth of the drug, intent on furthering a seven-year habit. She knew that her drug use was destructive and had long wanted to stop but lacked the will and means to do it on her own. “Plenty time mi want stop before the police even hold me…mi always a try fi stop but mi couldn’t stop on mi own, mi did need help so mi tell the judge that mi is a smoker and mi need help and she say ok, I’m going to help you,” Monica reflects. The judge, instead of sending her to jail, ordered her to attend the Drug Treatment Court, where she finally got the treatment and rehabilitation to overcome her drug habit. She admits that it was not smooth sailing as she even slipped up once when her urine test came back positive. “The second time mi positive when mi shouldn’t positive cause mi did go back go smoke and the judge put mi back in custody for two nights and say when mi come to court mi mus tell the court what me decide to do. Mi tell her say mi a go try and help myself because mi see that you trying to help me, so mi try mi best no meck it happen again,” Monica tells JIS News. She kept her promise, completing the programme in little over six months. Monica credits the programme for her changed lifestyle. She has established a support network with about four others from the treatment programme, and they have been encouraging each other, in the quest to remain drug free. Established by the Drug Court Treatment and Rehabilitation of Offenders Act in 2001, this special Court offers a treatment programme to individuals, who are believed to have committed offences whilst under the influence of drugs including alcohol, ganja, cocaine, morphine, opium and heroin. Described by many as an avenue for change and a second shot at life, the court, through its rehabilitation and treatment services, helps individuals to become drug-free, productive citizens. Resident Magistrate at the Corporate Area Resident Magistrate’s Court in Half-Way Tree, Stephanie Jackson-Haisley explains to JIS News that the Court is not a trial court but a “treatment court which employs the use of judicial supervision whereby participants undergo a treatment programme while being supervised by the court.” Individuals are required to attend one of the two treatment centres at Maxfield Park Health Centre in St. Andrew or Cornwall Regional Hospital, Montego Bay, St. James, where they interface weekly with counsellors and psychiatrists to obtain treatment in relation to their drug addiction. The programme may run from six months to two years depending on the level of progress by the participants. During the treatment period, participants are also engaged in vocational studies, literacy programmes, and sessions dealing with anger management, the effects of substance abuse on the body, dispute resolution and relapse prevention.  To be admitted participants must meet certain legal and medical criteria. The Resident Magistrate outlines that under the legal criteria, “the individual must be 17 years and over and must be charged with a relevant offence, that is, any offence that can be tried by a Resident Magistrate…so it would exclude the murderer, the person who has committed the offence of rape and more serious offences. It is geared towards the individual, who has committed a minor offence.” Having satisfied the legal criteria, the offender is referred to the treatment team for an assessment to see if he or she meets the medical condition for admittance, in that, the individual must not be suffering from any mental incapacity that will restrict their active participation in the programme. “Persons having psychosis or hallucinations and delusions cannot follow our counselling sessions and are not admitted to the programme,” notesConsultant Psychiatrist and Senior Medical Officer of Health at Bellevue Hospital, Dr. Myo Kyaw Oo. Dr. Oo says that the individual must also have a genuine desire to be rehabilitated and not other motives just to get away from their sentence. He explains that participants are expected to report to the treatment centre for individual and group counselling. The treatment period is divided into three phases with clients required to attend the centre five days per week during phase one; three days per week during phase two; and two days per week, during the third phase. The Drug Treatment Court utilises a rewards system where clients are subjected to weekly urine tests and are rewarded if these are consistently negative for the illegal substance. Conversely, positive urine tests will result in the court applying sanctions, which Mrs. Jackson-Haisley informs, includes imposing reporting and curfew conditions or spending a night in jail. “We find that the process of sanctioning and providing incentives has really worked, and that is really one of the hallmarks of the…judicial supervision process,” she says. If an offender wishes to discontinue treatment, his matter will be referred back to the regular court, where he will be tried and convicted, or acquitted. “I have seen many individuals who have been in the treatment programme,” the Resident Magistrates says, “individuals who have done well, those who have not been able to deal with the programme, individuals who have been expelled and had to be sent back to the regular court…there are those who have done remarkably well and who come back to the drug court to say how well they have been doing… they bring their certificates from HEART or whichever organisation they have been enrolled in since the treatment programme. I have seen individuals who have come back with their family members to show how well they have progressed,” she recalls. She notes that the ultimate goal of the drug treatment court is for persons to be rehabilitated, regain their rightful place in society and become productive citizens. “The drug court basically changes the way that people see the courts. It is totally non-adversarial in nature. It applies the concept of therapeutic jurisprudence, which is  really a concept where lawyers and judges try to look at the law in a richer, fuller way to see what therapeutic agents we can use to bring about change because when an offender enters into the drug court, it is an alternative to incarceration for him, and at the end of the day, he is assured that if he successfully completes the programme, he is not going to jail, he’s not even going to have a conviction recorded against him. In many instances, the offence is totally dispensed with,”Mrs. Jackson-Haisley states.  “It really is the vision of all of us that a time will come when drug court will be available to all eligible citizens of this country. It will therefore mean that we would have to have a drug court in all of the parishes, for that to happen,” she expresses. The legislation allows for the drug treatment court to be set up in all parishes across Jamaica but fiscal constraints have restricted the services to Kingston and St. Andrew, and St. James. The drug treatment court initiative is a collaborative effort of the Court Management Services (CMS) which was created in 2008 to provide administrative support to the island’s courts; and the Ministries of Health and National Security. For more information on the programme, persons may visit the CMS’s website at cms.gov.jm.last_img read more

Silver Spitfire fighter plane visits Fort St John as part of World Expedition

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The North Peace Regional Airport welcomed a special visitor on Thursday, September 5, to Fort St. John.As part of an expedition celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Royal Air Force, a newly restored British Silver Spitfire fighter plane from the Second World War landed in Fort St. John.The Mk IX Spitfire is being flown by British Pilots and is en route to Alaska after having left Britain five weeks ago. As of Friday, the Spitfire is 6,450 miles into its 27,000-mile four-month expedition of flying around the world.According to expedition organizers, the Spitfire is a British single-seat fighter aircraft that was built in 1943 and was used by the Royal Air Force and many other Allied countries before, during and after World War II.To follow the Spitfire’s expedition, you can visit silverspitfire.com.last_img read more

Can David Goffin Keep Winning

At a recent practice in Mons, Belgium, the country’s former leading man and its current top tennis player traded missiles from the baseline. Olivier Rochus grunted as he leapt into his classical one-handed backhand, while David Goffin quietly parried with groundstrokes into the corners. Goffin won most of the exchanges, and all 10 of the games.Rochus showed his frustration after it was done by sending a ball into the stands at the Lotto Mons Expo, where Belgium’s biggest men’s tennis tournament is taking place this week. But in a court-side interview afterwards, Rochus, who is 33 and retiring after this tournament, pointed out that he is in good company. “When my opponent is way better, what can you say? … It’s not only tough for me, it’s tough for everybody. I’m not the only one losing,” he said.Just about everyone is losing to the 23-year-old Goffin these days. From the start of July to the start of this tournament, Goffin won 34 of 36 matches, including the first 25, improving his ranking from 106th in the world to No. 31. In his 34 wins, he lost just four sets, and has been forced into just five tiebreakers. The rest of the sets he won decisively, seven by 6-0 and 11 by 6-1.Goffin’s glorious two and a half months had yielded nearly as much success as he had achieved in his prior four years as a pro. He’s won 17 tour-level matches and roughly $340,000 in earnings, increasing his career totals by about a half and a third, respectively.Goffin’s winning run is only matched in the last decade by the players who have been No. 1 during that time: Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic. No one else since 2004 has won 25 straight matches at tour, tour qualifying or challenger events, according to ATP World Tour stats guru Greg Sharko.Evidently, there are two ways to pull off a 25-match winning streak in tennis today: Be one of the best players of all time, or do what Goffin has done — set yourself an easy schedule and combine it with luck and improved play. Tennis players, unlike, say, NFL teams, can decide which events they play. Goffin and his coach chose ones with relatively weak fields — just nine of Goffin’s 34 wins were against players ranked above him — and now the young Belgian is on a winning run usually only experienced by the game’s very best.Winning brings ranking points, which means easier draws. It also brings money, which can be invested in coaches, physical trainers and more comfortable travel. The downside of winning is that it leaves little time for rest and for major work in practice. And if it comes against easy opponents, it may not provide useful preparation for tougher ones.But there are psychological advantages to winning. “You don’t doubt, you just attack every ball and then you are sure the ball will be in the court. It’s a great feeling,” Goffin said.Before his recent run, Goffin had been most famous for his losses. He made his Grand Slam debut as a lucky loser, snagging a spot in the draw despite losing in the last round of qualifying. He parlayed that berth in the 2012 French Open into a fourth-round loss to Federer, his childhood idol, and attained fame for smiling through an on-court interview afterward with the man whose face adorned posters on Goffin’s childhood bedroom walls. Goffin’s later Grand Slam losses also were to top players: Six of nine came to players seeded in the Top 10, four of those in the first round. The lucky loser had become an unlucky loser.Goffin sensed he was improving before his results did. In March of this year he started working with his current coach, Thierry van Cleemput, and began enjoying tennis again, shedding the defensiveness and doubtfulness that had plagued his game. But he kept running into tough competition, culminating with what van Cleemput called a “nightmare” of a draw in Wimbledon, against defending champion Andy Murray in the first round.Goffin and his coach decided it was time to step down a level. As most of the tour’s top players either rested after Wimbledon or moved to hard courts to prepare for the U.S. Open, Goffin stayed in Europe, on clay, entering a tournament in each week of July: three challengers — a rung below tour level — and one at the bottom level of the tour. He won all four tournaments. (Up until then, he had never won more than eight straight matches.) Then he came to the U.S. and won seven of nine matches — taking a set 6-0 off No. 8 Grigor Dimitrov. Back in Europe, he won seven straight matches, to send Belgium back to the top level of the Davis Cup and to win his second career title, again at the bottom level of the tour.“We decided to play some challengers to try to win some matches and to get some confidence,” Goffin said. “The level was there in practice and against Murray, but what I needed was to win some matches and to play a lot of matches.” He added, “I didn’t expect to win so many matches.” After all, he hadn’t made it past the quarterfinals of the four prior challengers he’d played this year.Van Cleemput said he and his young charge have been “lucky.” The coach is setting expectations low, despite Goffin’s recent run. Van Cleemput said Goffin’s target is for a career like that of No. 23 Alexandr Dolgopolov, a player from Ukraine who has never reached a Grand Slam semifinal or been ranked in the Top 10. Goffin has earned more ranking points since Wimbledon than five members of the Top 10, but van Cleemput isn’t expecting him to join that group any time soon. “The first objective now is to confirm the level of top 40, and to come near the level of the top 30,” he said. “The reality is important, not to dream all the time.”Recent tennis history supports the coach’s caution. Federer, Nadal and Djokovic didn’t play any challengers during their 25-match winning streaks. Much less familiar names precede Goffin’s on the list of players to win three straight challengers in the past 10 years. None has ever been ranked in the Top 30.It’s not only luck and easy opposition that has propelled Goffin to new heights. It’s also his serve. He hit aces on more than one in nine service points in eight of his 14 tour-level matches on hard courts this summer. He’d done that in just three of 50 prior hard-court matches at that level. It’s a remarkable feat for a player who is 5’11.” Height translates into the ability to hit at a sharper downward angle without the net getting in the way, which makes it easier to hit serves that are both fast and in the box. No one under 6′ has won a Grand Slam title in the past decade.Dolgopolov, the tour’s best sub-6-foot server, raises his contact point by leaping into the air. Goffin’s service motion is striking for how little he gets off the ground. Van Cleemput said his main intervention was to change Goffin’s toss and to emphasize the follow-through.Van Cleemput wants to get Goffin leaping higher on his serve, and to improve his strength and fitness. But when his player keeps playing events late into each week, he doesn’t get much time to work with him. For now, most of Goffin’s practice sessions are live matches.Goffin is confident he’ll have plenty of chances to work on his game and to keep getting better. “I have a lot of years in the future to do some good things,” he said — though he may never do anything as good as his unbeaten late-summer run. read more

International recruiting an asset for Ohio State womens tennis

The OSU women’s tennis team currently has 4 international players occupying its roster in sophomore Ferny Angeles Paz (left), sophomore Miho Kowase, junior Grainne O’Neill and sophomore Gabriella De Santis.Credit: Whitney Wilson / Lantern reporterTraveling to America from a foreign country can be a big change, offering an unfamiliar culture with new languages and learning experiences for some international students.The Ohio State women’s tennis team (12-4, 5-0) has eight players on its roster. Only half of those players are from the United States. The other four have traveled thousands of miles from Peru, Japan, Ireland and Venezuela to become Buckeyes.Coach Melissa Schaub said she considers international players to be great assets for the team.“Tennis is a very international sport, so you see a lot of international players in college tennis,” Schaub said. “It is much more popular in other countries than it is here in the U.S. These girls have been traveling around the world since a young age playing tennis, which is something not every American gets to do.”She said it can be difficult selecting eight scholarship players who can easily adapt to the program.“Recruiting in general is probably one of the biggest aspects of our job,” Schaub said. “There are some really good international tournaments called the Orange Bowl and Eddie Herr where you get to see the international players but get to stay here in the U.S. Once you see what you’re looking for, then you will take a trip over there to meet their coach and their family before bringing them to the U.S. for a visit.”Schaub said the girls brought a lot of experience as far as tournaments and playing internationally. She said the four international players have been a great addition to the program as teammates who show support for one another.“We have a good mix of different players on our team, and the American kids get to have a little bit of culture,” Schaub said. “College athletics for any athlete is an amazing experience, but for the international players, it’s even more amazing in some ways because in most other countries it’s either you continue with school or you continue with tennis, and here they get to do both.”Sophomore Gabby De Santis from Venezuela said she would have been faced with that difficult decision in her home country. Santis added that one advantage of moving to America is learning about a new culture while continuing her tennis and academic careers.“It’s interesting to know different people that think in different ways,” Santis said. “It is much more competitive here than in Venezuela where I would not have had the opportunity to study and play at a collegiate level at the same time.”Sophomore Ferny Angeles Paz said her native country of Peru and the U.S. are different in many ways.“I’ve never played indoors in Peru. It is very different because we don’t have indoor courts,” Paz said. “It’s pretty tough here. Everyone is good, everyone practices hard, and every team is competitive, so it’s tough.”Japanese sophomore Miho Kowase said the opportunity to move to the U.S. has offered several difficulties and benefits beyond playing tennis.“It’s hard for me because my family is 13 hours time difference compared to America,” Kowase said. “My sister lives in Georgia, so that has really helped me adjust to living in America. Also, for me to learn English and being able to speak English is such a huge advantage in Japan.”Junior Grainne O’Neill from Ireland said Buckeye tradition is what has helped make her experience at OSU so gratifying.“It’s great, I feel like the whole Buckeye community really helped me out big time when I first moved here because I really did not know anything at all,” O’Neill said. “It’s just great to have people behind you. We have a whole team and our coaches and staff are great so they really have helped out big time. When we travel to different places you hear ‘O-H’ and ‘Go Bucks’ and that’s really nice.”With no seniors on the roster, all eight players are set to return next year for the 2015-16 season. In the meantime, the Buckeyes (12-4, 5-0) are set to take on Purdue on Friday in Columbus at 3 p.m. read more