July 29 2016This continues our report about the i

first_imgJuly 29, 2016This continues our report about the installation of a grey water system designed to handle the needs of the East Crescent Phase 5 building.6/6/2016Tristan Tollas, Brodie Atkinson, and Charlie Correales, all from the May 2016 workshop, install the purple reclaimed water pipes that will deliver the grey water to the Colly Garden.[photos and text by Scott Riley]6/10/2014Several members of the Construction Crew and workshop participants sift the earth prior to backfilling the plumbing trench.7/5/2016The Grey Water plumbing manifold awaits the installation of the irrigation dripline in the Colly Garden, the primary project for the June 2016 workshop. The pump, float switches, Geoflow irrigation components, and technical expertise were supplied by Applied Process Equipment, of Scottsdale (contact Richard Sinclair).last_img read more

Internet service provider Free has communicated it

first_imgInternet service provider Free has communicated its vehement opposition to parts of the French broadcasters’ plans for streaming platform Salto to the competition watchdog currently assessing the project, according to a report by Le Monde.According to the paper, Free has sent a letter to the Autorité de la Concurrence outlining its concerns about plans to offer the broadcasters’ live channels on the platform, in addition to video-on-demand.Le Monde reports that Free has denounced the plan to distribute the country’s main channels on the digital platform as the creation of a “cartel” that will disadvantage other distributors.According to Free, Salto, by providing a platform for channels that account for 80% of the national audience, will effectively have a stranglehold on access to them.Free is reportedly far from being assuaged by commitments recently made by the broadcasters to secure a regulatory green light for Salto. These concessions include providing access to the channels on a non-exclusive basis at non-discriminatory prices. However, according to the letter sent by the ISP, as cited by Le Monde, Free believes that the television groups will have a clear incentive to hike up the prices paid for carriage by Salto, giving them further leverage in negotiations with ISPs.Free’s opposition follows a bitter battle over several years between ISPs and commercial broadcasters TF1 and M6 over the terms of carriage for their channels. That dispute ended with a victory for the broadcasters, which were able to levy financial contributions from the ISPs in exchange for carriage of their channels and associated digital services.OTT TV platform Molotov has also expressed its opposition to the project, according to Le Monde. The OTT provider has reportedly compared the project to being akin to a combination of France’s three leading supermarket chains, Leclerc, Monoprix and Carrefour.Molotov has been in dispute with TF1 over its failure to strike a new deal to distribute the latter’s channels on its platform following the expiry of its previous agreement at the end of June.According to Le Monde’s report, other ISPs are either more sanguine or have declined to comment. Orange has asked the Autorité de la Concurrence to ensure that it will be able to distribute Salto without minimum guarantees. Bouygues Telecom, which declined the paper’s request for comment, has shared ownership with TF1, while Altice France/SFR, which also declined to comment, is currently demanding carriage fees for its own channels from rival ISPs.last_img read more