VR Hardware Startup Varjo Raises 31 Million for HighResolution Headset

first_imgVarjo wants to use its new funding to staff up and grow its current team of 80 employees to over 200 in the next 12 months. The company also wants to further work with enterprise partners, and already has struck partnership agreements with companies including Airbus, Volkswagen and Volvo.“The resolution of VR devices on the market today is a fraction of what the average human eye can see,” said Atomico’s Zennstroem in a statement. “Until we met Varjo’s visionary founders and experienced their superior product firsthand, we thought that VR was still at least 10 years away from being truly useful for professionals.”The flip side of this enterprise focus is that technology like that developed by Varjo likely won’t reach consumers any time soon. That’s not only due to the high price tag — Bloomberg estimated Monday that Varjo’s headset would cost anywhere from $6000 to $11,000 — but also due to the fact that Varjo seems dead-set on productizing its technology itself.Company executives told Variety last year that they had no plans to license their technology to any of the big players currently dominating the consumer VR market. Popular on Variety Helsinki-based virtual reality (VR) hardware startup Varjo has raised a new $31 million Series B round of funding led by Atomico, the venture capital company of Skype co-founder Niklas Zennstroem. Other investors include Next47, EQT Ventures and Lifeline Ventures.Including the new cash infusion, Varjo has now raised a total of $46 million. The company has been working on its own VR headset, which promises to have a much higher resolution than today’s consumer-grade VR hardware.Varjo says it can reach human-eye resolution with an interesting trick: The company is essentially putting a small high-resolution display at the center of a user’s field-of-view, which is fused with a bigger regular-resolution display. The idea is to offer the highest-possible resolution right in front of a viewer, and add regular-resolution images for their peripheral vision.center_img ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15last_img read more

Researchers use Facebook to dispel notion that social contagion is like biological

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A comparison of how people who received invitations to join Facebook from four groups of friends responded. Connections between the groups are shown in the squares at the bottom of each column. The less connected those four groups were,the more likely they were to join. These are averages over millions of invitations. Credit: Provided/Kleinberg et al More information: Structural diversity in social contagion, PNAS, Published online before print April 2, 2012, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1116502109AbstractThe concept of contagion has steadily expanded from its original grounding in epidemic disease to describe a vast array of processes that spread across networks, notably social phenomena such as fads, political opinions, the adoption of new technologies, and financial decisions. Traditional models of social contagion have been based on physical analogies with biological contagion, in which the probability that an individual is affected by the contagion grows monotonically with the size of his or her “contact neighborhood”—the number of affected individuals with whom he or she is in contact. Whereas this contact neighborhood hypothesis has formed the underpinning of essentially all current models, it has been challenging to evaluate it due to the difficulty in obtaining detailed data on individual network neighborhoods during the course of a large-scale contagion process. Here we study this question by analyzing the growth of Facebook, a rare example of a social process with genuinely global adoption. We find that the probability of contagion is tightly controlled by the number of connected components in an individual’s contact neighborhood, rather than by the actual size of the neighborhood. Surprisingly, once this “structural diversity” is controlled for, the size of the contact neighborhood is in fact generally a negative predictor of contagion. More broadly, our analysis shows how data at the size and resolution of the Facebook network make possible the identification of subtle structural signals that go undetected at smaller scales yet hold pivotal predictive roles for the outcomes of social processes.Press release (PhysOrg.com) — Historically, diseases tend to spread most quickly when introduced into a crowded environment. The more neighbors there are, the more easily viruses can hop from person to person. More recently, the same sort of language has been used to describe how social ideas and adoption spreads. Facebook for example, has been described as spreading like a disease. Now however, researchers from Cornell University have shown that users adopting Facebook, tend to do so more predictably when receiving invitations from multiple sources, rather than a lot of requests from members of the same group, which implies that Facebook and its growth, does not actually compare with biological contagion at all. They have published their results in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences © 2012 PhysOrg.com Citation: Researchers use Facebook to dispel notion that social contagion is like biological contagion (2012, April 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-04-facebook-dispel-notion-social-contagion.htmlcenter_img The research team started out as just Johan Kleinberg and Jon Ugander, researchers at Cornell, but soon grew to four as Lars Backstrom and Cameron Marlow, sociologists working for Facebook signed on. Together the team was able to study actual Facebook data. Specifically, they looked at what happens when a user first joins Facebook; their email contact list is examined and Facebook then offers to send an invitation to everyone on that list who is not already a Facebook member. Facebook also offers to send an invitation to “friend” other Facebook users who have the new user already listed in their contact list. In watching and analyzing the circumstances under which users respond to such requests the researchers found patterns emerging. The most striking of which was the fact that users are more likely to accept such requests if they come from people who reside in social different groups, than if they all came from the same one. An example would be, if a person receives invitations to join Facebook from people they work with, some friends, as well as some from people in their Book of the Month club, they are more likely to join than if they simply receive a bunch of invitations from their regular group of friends. They also found that upon accepting the invites, those that do so as a result of getting invites from a more diverse group tend to spend more time on Facebook, indicating perhaps, that a more diverse group of “friends” is ultimately more interesting.Besides providing practical information for marketers, the results of the teams research help dispel the notion that social acceptance of new ideas or people spreads in much the same way as diseases do through human populations. The team says that a users, rather than responding to requests to join Facebook from a bunch of friends from their normal social clique, tend to be more likely to accept requests to join if they come from a more divergent group, or in other words, people from different groups, even if they don’t know a lot of the people in those other groups. Explore further A Facebook “Neighborhood.” This member has two large, closely interconnected clumps of friends, and a few smaller clumps. Each clump probably represents a different social context — people from work, people from a hobby, and so on. Cornell research shows that many requests from one context are less effective in influencing decisions than requests coming from many directions. Credit: Provided/Kleinberg et al Facebook launches mobile messaging applast_img read more

Related easyJet cabin luggage explained and how to

first_img RelatedeasyJet cabin luggage explained and how to maximise your hand baggage allowanceDon’t get caught out by easyJet hand luggage allowances; here are the latest baggage restrictions, plus a few tips on how to avoid paying cabin bag fees:Aer Lingus to increase baggage feesAer Lingus to increase baggage feesKLM hand luggage explained and how to maximise your cabin baggage allowanceWhat size does your hand luggage have to be be go on board a KLM flight? What liquids can you take in your cabin baggage, and what other items are restricted? Here’s everything you need to know about KLM hand luggage allowances and restrictions, plus a few tips on avoiding… If you’re going to San Francisco, be sure to wear some flowers in your hair, but if you’re going to the airport, be sure to have enough money to pay your baggage check-in fee.California resident Teri Weissinger found this out to her cost as she attempted to fly to Idaho to start a new life.Not a frequent flyer with US Airways, Ms Weissinger was unaware that checking in her luggage with the carrier would incur a cost. In fact, it was five years since she had taken to the skies and so arrived at San Francisco International Airport with nothing but her airline ticket, two bags and 30 dollars to her name. However, the carrier demanded a further 60 dollars to check in her bags. Alas, Ms Weissinger hadn’t read the small print and thought that checking in luggage was still free.Not having enough cash to pay for her belongings, the unfortunate woman had to put her new life in Idaho on hold as she was stranded for the following eight nights in the airport. It’s a story that resembles Steven Spielberg’s 2004 flick ‘The Terminal’, where Tom Hanks ends up living in an airport, passing his time by eyeing collecting trolleys and eying up air hostess Catherine Zeta Jones.Alas, for Ms Weissinger, there was no Hollywood-style rescue by a hunky pilot, but her story did have a happy ending; members of the airport’s church raised the 210 dollars needed to pay for a new flight and allow her to finally flee to Idaho – bags included.ReturnOne wayMulti-cityFromAdd nearby airports ToAdd nearby airportsDepart14/08/2019Return21/08/2019Cabin Class & Travellers1 adult, EconomyDirect flights onlySearch flights Maplast_img read more