Latest on gas tax repeal effort and its impact on other primary

first_imgLatest on gas tax repeal effort and its impact on other primary elections KUSI Newsroom 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsWith last night’s primary behind us, we are now seeing the large impact the recent car and gas tax is having on voters and how the issue is influencing other races as well.KUSI’s Logan Byrnes has more on what we can expect leading up to the November election. June 6, 2018 Posted: June 6, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, Categories: Local San Diego News Tags: Decision 2018 FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Readers Digest Considering Name Change

first_imgLeader’s DigestReader’s NastEveryday, Inc.The House that Rachael BuiltPurpose DrivenPleasantville PublishingEscape From Condé NastMary Berner OmnimediaFDA Along with its coverage of the Reader’s Digest Association’s mega deal with a mega church to produce a magazine and a social networking site RDA calls a “Facebook for Christians,” the New York Times reports that RDA CEO Mary Berner is “casting about” for a new name for the company.We’ve heard rumblings about this since as early as September. It appears that even Berner—who has been somewhat of a lightning rod since coming over to Pleasantville from Condé Nast—is having a tough time deciding on one.So, in the spirit of community, I thought it’d be fun—and useful!—to collectively brainstorm new names for Reader’s Digest. Here are some suggestions from the FOLIO: staff. Feel free to add yours in the comments section below.last_img read more

Matt Bean Is Entertainment Weekly Editor

first_img[This story first appeared on sister site min.]The nearly one-month-old mystery of Jess Cagle’s successor as Entertainment Weekly editor was resolved on Feb. 10 when Cagle—who has doubled as People editor and EW editorial director since Jan. 13—announced the intra-Time Inc. hire of SI.com managing editor Matt Bean.He leaves one content-busy brand for another, with the post-Super Bowl SI in the midst of the Winter Olympics and about to embark on the Swimsuit issue’s 50th anniversary.  EW will culminate its busy awards season with the Oscars on March 2.Bean came to SI and Time Inc. in Aug. 2012 from Rodale, where min digital media editor Steve Smith credited his stewardship for “developing one of the most ambitious and sophisticated mobile app programs of any magazine publisher.”  As Men’s Health articles editor earlier during his eight-year stint, he oversaw theNational Magazine Award-nominated front-of-book section and spearheaded the launch of the first-to-market tablet edition in 2010. Being the on-air host of Spike TV’s adventure-sports driven The Playbook while at MH extended to Bean starting the SI Now daily live talk show.Said Cagle: “Matt’s arrival is a testament to Time Inc.’s confidence in EW. He is [an especially] talented editor well-suited to this unique brand, and it will be a thrill to see where he and the extraordinary staff take EW in the years to come.”last_img read more

ASEAN leaders agree to work to resolve Rohingya crisis

first_imgRohingya refugees make their way to a refugee camp after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border in Palong Khali, near Cox`s Bazar.File photo ReutersAustralia and its ASEAN neighbours vowed to boost defence ties while stressing the importance of non-militarisation in the disputed South China Sea Sunday at a summit where the “complex” Rohingya crisis took centre stage.Leaders from the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, at the three-day meeting in Sydney, also agreed to work more closely to tackle the growing menace of violent extremism and radicalisation.But while a final communique noted a resolve to “protect the human rights of our peoples”, it failed to condemn member state Myanmar’s treatment of the Muslim-minority Rohingya.Nearly 700,000 Rohingya have fled the troubled Rakhine state for Bangladesh since authorities launched a brutal crackdown six months ago that the UN has called “ethnic cleansing”.Myanmar, whose de-facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi was in Sydney, has vehemently denied the allegations.“We discussed the situation in Rakhine state at considerable length today,” Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said at a closing press conference.“Aung San Suu Kyi addressed the matter comprehensively, at some considerable length herself,” he said.“It’s a very complex problem … Everyone seeks to end the suffering that has been occasioned by the events, the conflict.”Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, said the crisis was “a concern for all ASEAN countries, and yet ASEAN is not able to intervene to force an outcome”.Security threatTensions in the South China Sea remain a big worry for regional leaders, as Beijing continues to build artificial islands capable of hosting military installations-much to the chagrin of other claimants to the area.Vietnam remains the most vocal in the dispute with the Philippines backing off under China-friendly President Rodrigo Duterte. Taiwan, Malaysia and Brunei also have claims.Canberra and ASEAN reaffirmed “the importance of maintaining and promoting peace, stability, maritime safety and security, freedom of navigation and overflight in the region”, without naming Beijing.The leaders added they wanted to see an “early conclusion of an effective code of conduct in the South China Sea”.“We will uphold our commitment to the rules-based order and international law in the region, including the South China Sea,” stressed Turnbull.With China flexing its muscle, they also committed to enhancing “the scope and sophistication of defence cooperation”, while expressing “grave concern” about escalating tensions on the Korean peninsula.Day two of the summit on Saturday was devoted to counter-terrorism, with an agreement to work together to tackle extremism amid growing concern about the use of the “dark web”, or encrypted messaging apps, by terrorists to plan attacks.Fears have been heightened by jihadists now being forced out of Syria and Iraq with the Islamic State caliphate mostly crushed, and into other countries.Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak cited the flow of the displaced Rohingya as a potential new security threat, with desperate people more susceptible to radicalisation.Human rights issues were a key focus of protests during the summit, with thousands denouncing Aung San Suu Kyi, Cambodian strongman Hun Sen and Vietnam’s Nguyen Xuan Phuc, who are accused of oppression.With the Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade pact, without the United States, now signed, Turnbull urged leaders to get behind a “high quality” Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership deal.Australia, the full ASEAN bloc, as well as China and India are among countries still negotiating that deal.Singapore’s Lee said there was hope it could be finalised this year.“This is a historic opportunity to establish the world’s largest trade bloc,” he said.ASEAN groups Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam, with Australia, a dialogue partner since 1974.last_img

Lynching Memorial and Museum in Alabama Draw Crowds Tears

first_imgBy BETH J. HARPAZ, AP Travel EditorTears and expressions of grief met the opening of the nation’s first memorial to the victims of lynching April 26 in Alabama.Hundreds lined up in the rain to get a first look at the memorial and museum in Montgomery.The National Memorial for Peace and Justice commemorates 4,400 Black people who were slain in lynchings and other racial killings between 1877 and 1950. Their names, where known, are engraved on 800 dark, rectangular steel columns, one for each U.S. county where lynchings occurred.This photo shows a bronze statue called “Raise Up,” part of the display at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, a new memorial to honor thousands of people killed in lynchings, launched April 26 in Montgomery, Ala. The memorial and an accompanying museum that open this week in Montgomery are a project of the nonprofit Equal Justice Initiative, a legal advocacy group in Montgomery. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)A related museum, called The Legacy Museum: From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration, is opening in Montgomery.Many visitors shed tears and stared intently at the commemorative columns, many of which are suspended in the air from above.Toni Battle drove from San Francisco to attend. “I’m a descendant of three lynching victims,” Battle said, her face wet with tears. “I wanted to come and honor them and also those in my family that couldn’t be here.”Ava DuVernay, the Oscar-nominated film director, told several thousand people at a conference marking the memorial launch to “to be evangelists and say what you saw and what you experienced here. … Every American who believes in justice and dignity must come here … Don’t just leave feeling like, ‘That was amazing. I cried.’ … Go out and tell what you saw.”As for her own reaction, DuVernay said: “This place has scratched a scab. It’s really open for me right now.”Angel Smith Dixon, who is biracial, came from Lawrenceville, Ga., to see the memorial.“We’re publicly grieving this atrocity for the first time as a nation. … You can’t grieve something you can’t see, something you don’t acknowledge. Part of the healing process, the first step is to acknowledge it.”Part of a statue depicting chained people is on display at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, a new memorial to honor thousands of people killed in racist lynchings. The national memorial aims to teach about America’s past in hope of promoting understanding and healing. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)The Rev. Jesse Jackson, a longtime civil rights activist, told reporters after visiting the memorial that it would help to dispel America’s silence on lynching.“Whites wouldn’t talk about it because of shame. Blacks wouldn’t talk about it because of fear,” he said.The crowd included White and Black visitors. Mary Ann Braubach, who is White, came from Los Angeles to attend. “As an American, I feel this is a past we have to confront,” she said as she choked back tears.DuVernay, Jackson, playwright Anna Deavere Smith, the singing group Sweet Honey in the Rock, Congressman John Lewis and other activists and artists spoke and performed at an opening ceremony Thursday night that was by turns somber and celebratory.Among those introduced and cheered with standing ovations were activists from the 1950s Montgomery bus boycott, Freedom Rider Bernard Lafayette, and one of the original Little Rock Nine, Elizabeth Eckford.“There are forces in America today trying to take us back,” Lewis said, adding, “We’re not going back. We’re going forward with this museum.”Singer Patti Labelle ended the evening with a soulful rendition of “A Change is Gonna Come.”Other launch events include a “Peace and Justice Summit” featuring celebrities and activists like Marian Wright Edelman and Gloria Steinem in addition to DuVernay.The summit, museum and memorial are projects of the Equal Justice Initiative, a Montgomery-based legal advocacy group founded by attorney Bryan Stevenson. Stevenson won a MacArthur “genius” award for his human rights work.The group bills the project as “the nation’s first memorial dedicated to the legacy of enslaved black people, people terrorized by lynching, African Americans humiliated by racial segregation and Jim Crow, and people of color burdened with contemporary presumptions of guilt and police violence.”Several thousand people gave Stevenson a two-minute standing ovation at a morning session of the Peace and Justice Summit. Later in the day, Edelman, founder of the Children’s Defense Fund, urged the audience to continue their activism beyond the day’s events on issues like ending child poverty and gun violence: “Don’t come here and celebrate the museum … when we’re letting things happen on an even greater scale.”last_img read more