BtoB Brand Tech Decisions Goes Digital Only

first_imgSummit Professional Networks announced a shift to digital for its quarterly magazine, Tech Decisions, toward the end of the first quarter in 2014. Tech Decisions, currently operating via PropertyCasualty360.com, will continue to be housed there as a web-based magazine with plans for a tablet magazine. In addition, Summit Professional Networks will offer an expanded digital portfolio including custom content creation for its partners, webcasts and face-to-face events.“The relevance to the tech audience is to see the information in their domain,” says Gary Mirkin, senior vice president of the Custom Solutions Group at  Summit Professional Networks. “We made the decision [to go digital] because the distribution is solid and that it is being sought after by our audience through our tech channels.”In 2013, Tech Decisions magazine produced four regular issues, one special edition and a weekly e-newsletter called “Tech Digest Weekly” to a roughly 24,000-person circulation of mostly c-level executives, IT managers and larger mid-market agents in the insurance industry. “We see the potential to increase [our audience] by virtue of broadening the editorial focus of the digital publication [and] the ability to reach the other segments that Summit Professional Networks focuses on—financial, insurance, legal and subsets of those,” Mirkin contends. “In essence, the strategy should take the circulation much higher.”As part of the new strategy’s digital format, Summit plans to leverage its presence in the financial services, benefits and legal markets by adding “strategic thought-leader programs” to its portfolio including webcast, video, live event and whitepaper components, acting as a “channel -support tool generator” to help its partners disseminate information to their clients, according to Mirkin.“Digital obviously offers a much broader audience a platform that they’re used to using now rather than a platform that is clearly somewhat cumbersome for people to get to,” he says.  “They should get the information in the platform they’re used to and that they want to, so that it becomes more of a tool for them. It’s kind of the way of the world in this particular [audience] segment.”However, Mirkin does not disregard the appeal of print or its market demand.He adds that if a sponsor showed “great interest and would like print issues for their channel, sales force or their tradeshow,” the company would consider accommodating the request.last_img read more

Verizon Announces Price Increases For Wilmington Fios Customers

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Town Manager Jeff Hull recently notified residents of upcoming Fios TV consumer pricing increases, slated to happen on or after September 1, 2018.These changes include:The Fios Local TV Service package will increase from $12.99 to $25.00 per monthThe Fios Quantum Gateway Router Rate will increase from $10.00 to $12.00 per monthThe monthly rental rates for the Set Top Box (STB) will change based on the number of STBs a subscriber rents. Subscribers will only be charged for up to five STBs. The monthly rental rate for the first two STBs will be $12 each per month, and the monthly rental rate for the third, fourth and fifth STBs will be $6 each per month. There will be no monthly charge for additional STBs.Verizon will notify subscribers of these increases by “bill messages” beginning on or after July 1.New rates may not become effective on certain subscriber accounts until current discounts expire.Selectman Chair Kevin Caira was quick to point out that the Selectmen nor the Town have any say over price or offering changes.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSELECTMEN NOTEBOOK: 6 Things That Happened At This Month’s Selectmen’s MeetingIn “Government”News & Notes From WCTV: WCTV Executive Director Shaun Neville Answers YOUR QuestionsIn “Community”SELECTMEN NEWS: 5 Things That Happened At This Week’s MeetingIn “Government”last_img read more

University research team creates augmented reality sandbox w Video

first_img More information: Project page idav.ucdavis.edu/~okreylos/ResDev/SARndbox/ What’s even cooler is the fact that the software used to create the simulations is all available under a GNU public license agreement, which means most any school, museum or other teaching program could build a similar system at very little cost. With such a system, students can gain a deeper understanding of how land and water systems interact and see for themselves how changes to topography over time cause changes in the environment in a much more hands-on fashion than when building static models out of sand, dirt or clay. Pico projector used in eye based video gaming system Explore further © 2012 Phys.Org (Phys.org) — Most children at some point in their schooling are taught about the water table and many wind up being tasked with creating a model of some sort to represent how it all works. Some use clay, but many more likely use sand, as it’s far easier and faster than most anything else. Now researchers at UC Davis have taken that model to new extremes by building a sandbox system that is capable of automatically adding augmented reality real-time coloring to the sand to indicate altitude and moving water as changes are made to the terrain with a hand or small tool.center_img Citation: University research team creates augmented reality sandbox (w/ Video) (2012, May 11) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-05-university-team-augmented-reality-sandbox.html The project is part of the University’s Keck Center for Active Visualization in the Earth Sciences (funded by a National Science Foundation grant) and was started as a means of building an educational system for children to help kids better visualize how land and water systems work. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. To make the sandbox, the team combined a Kinect 3D camera, a digital projector and simulation software running on a computer and of course, an ordinary sandbox raised up on four legs for optimal viewing.The system works by first collecting images of the sandbox from above using the Kinect camera, at thirty frames per second, as a demonstrator (or student) changes the landscape below in the sandbox. Information from the camera is fed to a computer running the simulation software (Vrui VR development toolkit). The software generates different colors to represent different elevation levels in a virtual topological map. It also uses a set of Saint-Venant shallow water equations to create realistic looking water movement. Both are then projected down onto the sandbox in real time, giving the appearance of reacting to changes made by a person creating hills, valleys, rivers, streams and lakes in the sand. The result is nearly instant color coding of elevation topography and the instigation of virtual water into the modeled waterways.last_img read more

How honeybees maintain protective clumps under stressful conditions

first_imgCredit: CC0 Public Domain Once a year, honeybees, led by a queen, leave their nests in droves to find a new home. But because it takes some time to find a site and build a new nest, there is a period when they have no place to live. To protect themselves during this time, they congregate into masses that hang from tree branches—these clusters are made entirely of bees, each clinging to one another. In its most natural state, such clusters tend to form in the shape of a cone. But prior research has shown that the cone shape becomes flattened during inclement weather, such as when the wind blows. In this new effort, the researchers wondered how the honeybees knew what to do when adverse conditions arose. To find out, they gathered bees from the wild and put them in a container in their lab where they were allowed to form a cluster, dangling from a movable apparatus.Once a cluster formed, the researchers moved the apparatus to pull the cluster back and forth, simulating the impact of wind pushing the branch upon which they hung. As the researchers watched, the cluster slowly flattened, hugging the apparatus. A flatter shape, the researchers noted, would reduce pressure from the wind, just as it would for a person lying on the ground versus standing up. By studying slow-motion video of the bees and tracking the movement of those on the surface of the cluster, the researchers developed a theory—they believed that the bees, upon feeling pulled from the bees they were holding on to, moved themselves to a place of higher stress.To test this theory, the group created a computer simulation of the honeybees and their cluster and then gave those on the outer surface the ability to feel stress and to react to it by moving to a position of higher stress. They found the virtual bees changed the shape of their cluster in the same way as did those in the real one, offering strong evidence that their theory was correct. Inside the brains of killer bees Explore further A team of researchers at Harvard University has discovered the means by which honeybees keep their temporary clumps intact during adverse weather conditions. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, the group describes their study of honeybee behavior in their lab and what the found. Journal information: Nature Physicscenter_img More information: O. Peleg et al. Collective mechanical adaptation of honeybee swarms, Nature Physics (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41567-018-0262-1 © 2018 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: How honeybees maintain protective clumps under stressful conditions (2018, September 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-09-honeybees-clumps-stressful-conditions.htmllast_img read more