Vegetable prices normalise as supplies improve in Maharashtra

first_imgA week after farmers started their agitation across Maharashtra, vegetable prices started normalising as supplies to wholesale markets improved on Wednesday amid heavy police security. But farmers continued their protest.The protesters scuffled with the police in Sangli district as they attempted to disrupt a vegetable market in the afternoon. The protesters accused the police of using force to transport eight activists belonging to the Kisan Sabha and the Swabhimani Shetkari Sanghatana. The police said they were moved from Sangli to another place to prevent incitement to violence. The police have prohibited assembly of people in public places under Section 144 of the Cr.PC till June 19 in Nashik district, where the suicides of two farmers on Monday and Tuesday added fuel to the agitation. The police in Pune district have been asked to act against burning of effigies. Yet, effigies were burnt in parts of Latur district in Marathwada. Farmers staged a demonstration against the Devendra Fadnavis-led BJP government near the home of BJP leader and district guardian minister Sambhaji Patil Nilangekar. The police arrested 17 protesters.Demonstrations were more intense in Ahmednagar district where markets were shut in Sangamner. The cow market was suspended in Rahata. Vegetable supplies improved at the agricultural produce market committees in Mumbai, Kolhapur and Pune, as the produce arrived from other States.last_img read more

Chiefs stay in F4 hunt

first_imgView comments Kent Salado stood at the forefront of Arellano’s charge as the Chiefs continued their late assault at a Final Four berth with a 95-65 whipping of also-ran St. Benilde last Thursday in NCAA Season 93 at Filoil Flying V Centre in San Juan.Salado scattered 16 points and dished out 11 assists as the Chiefs rolled to their sixth win in 15 games, pulling level with Emilio Aguinaldo College at sixth spot.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutIt was the biggest win of the season yet for the Chiefs who, for most of the season, have been a shadow of the team that reached the Final Four the past three years.“It’s a very important (win) and I can’t exaggerate it because actually all our remaining games are important,” said Arellano coach Jerry Codiñera. “If we were able to do this in the first round, I think we would have a better chance. But nonetheless, this win gives us hope.” The Chiefs shot 50 percent from the field as five other players posted double digit outputs, including Zach Nicholls and Lervin Flores, who chipped in 13 points and 12 points, respectively.“We expected this performance from Kent (Salado) because he’s really matured,” said Codiñera, whose team took an early double-digit lead and never looked back. “We had a good start and the support group also responded.”The win gave the Chiefs a lifeline in the race for the two remaining Final Four spots. As it stands, Jose Rizal holds pole position with a 9-7 record with Letran (8-7) and San Sebastian (7-7) also in the running.While Codiñera knows their fate is no longer in their hands, the Arellano coach is hopeful the other teams slip.“We just have to win our remaining games and hope for the best,” he said. “If we end up with nine (wins), we might finish third especially with the win over the other rule. I think we have a good chance with the quotient system.”ADVERTISEMENT Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC LATEST STORIES Don’t count the Arellano Chiefs out just yet.ADVERTISEMENT Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Read Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Import invasion: Top-notch reinforcements add spice to Grand Prix tournament LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president MOST READ Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:58Trump blames media, Democrats for impeachment during Kentucky rally01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Later, Mapua notched its second straight win at the expense of Perpetual Help, 76-71.Andoy Estrella picked up 22 points including nine in the final period while Christian Buñag added 16 points as the Cardinals improved to 3-12. The Blazers dropped to last place with a 3-13 card.last_img read more

Rice U lab leads hunt for new zeolites

first_imgAddThis ShareCONTACT: Mike WilliamsPHONE: 713-348-6728                                                                                   E-MAIL: mikewilliams@rice.eduRice U. lab leads hunt for new zeolitesDatabase details 2.7 million possible structures for molecular sievesIn all the world, there are about 200 types of zeolite, a compound of silicon, aluminum and oxygen that gives civilization such things as laundry detergent, kitty litter and gasoline. But thanks to computations by Rice University professor Michael Deem and his colleagues, it appears there are — or could be — more types of zeolites than once thought. A lot more.A project that goes back 20 years came to fruition earlier this year when Deem, Rice’s John W. Cox Professor in Biochemical and Genetic Engineering and a professor of physics and astronomy, and his team came up with a list that shows the structures of more than 2.7 million zeolite-like materials. Of those, they found the thermodynamic characteristics of as many as 314,000 are near enough to currently known zeolites that it should be possible to manufacture these materials.Creation of the public database is the focus of a new paper, “Computational Discovery of New Zeolite-Like Materials,” posted online by the American Chemical Society’s Journal of Physical Chemistry C and planned as the cover of the Dec. 24 print edition. The paper’s authors include Ramdas Pophale, a postdoctoral research associate in Deem’s lab; Phillip Cheeseman, senior scientific applications analyst at Purdue’s Rosen Center for Advanced Computing; and David Earl, an assistant professor of chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh.Zeolites can be viewed as “a membrane that will only let molecules of a certain size pass through,” Deem said. “But they also do other things. They have an affinity for some molecules, so they’re used to absorb odors, for instance, in flower shops.”In laundry detergents, zeolites trade soft ions for hard ones in the water, and the petrochemical industry uses zeolites to crack petroleum into gasoline, diesel and other products. After the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant, zeolites were used to adsorb radioactive ions.Zeolites are a fine lattice, a molecular sieve that can let molecules of a certain size pass while blocking others. They can also adsorb molecules, attracting and gripping certain substances — for which cats and their owners are grateful.Natural zeolites are often the product of volcanic activity, as rocks, ash and alkaline water combine and crystallize over thousands of years. “The term zeolite comes from the combination of two Greek words that mean ‘boiling’ and ‘stone,’” Deem said. About a third of zeolites used for commercial purposes are mined, while the rest are synthesized into custom configurations that tend to be more pure, he said.The fact that only 200 or so zeolites are known makes the creation of Deem’s database a real breakthrough, as it gives industries new clues to optimizing their techniques. “That’s one possibility, to look for related materials,” he said. “In many catalytic applications, there’s only one material that currently works.”It took serious computer time to figure out all the possibilities, said Deem, who has lately gained a measure of fame for his study of viruses, particularly H1N1. He began looking at zeolites two decades ago while at Exxon and published his first paper on the subject in the journal Nature. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the use of the Deem lab’s Zefsa II software, researchers needed three years to complete the computations on the NSF’s TeraGrid node at Purdue. “I think we were the biggest user of computer time there in 2006, and the fifth- or sixth-largest on the TeraGrid,” Deem said. “At Purdue, we were making use of unused computer cycles, like the SETI@home project that searches for extraterrestrial life using people’s home computers. We finished around the start of 2009.”The “big question,” he said, is how to turn theoretical zeolites into real ones, a project his lab plans to pursue. “A couple of things have to happen. One is that we have to identify materials that look like they would have good properties, and then we have to find a synthesis mechanism to make those materials.”But how does one narrow the practicalities from 2.7 million possibilities? “It depends on the properties we’re looking for,” Deem said. “We have some ideas of what’s practical, but of course we would love to work with other people.” The work received support from the U.S. Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences Program and from the NSF.View the paper online at http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jp906984z.  The database is available at http://sdpd.univ-lemans.fr/cod/pcod/. To download a zeolite graphic, go to http://www.rice.edu/nationalmedia/images/zeo. last_img read more