Benitez Newcastle determined to bounce back from shaky start

first_imgNewcastle United boss Rafael Benitez insists his side are determined to turn around their fortunes heading into Saturday’s trip to Crystal PalaceThe Magpies have just one point from their first five games of their Premier League campaign.Benitez’s recent defensive approach has been openly questioned by critics with Chelsea coach Maurizio Sarri admitting that he was surprised to see the Spaniard use such tactics.But Benitez insists that Newcastle will be going all-out to claim the three points at Selhurst Park this weekend.“We want to win. We want to get three points in every game, but especially after the start,” said Benitez on Chronicle Live.“We should be closer with these teams.Roberto Firmino, LiverpoolVirgil van Dijk praises Roberto Firmino after Liverpool’s win Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Virgil van Dijk hailed team-mate Roberto Firmino after coming off the bench to inspire Liverpool to a 3-1 comeback win against Newcastle United.“It will not be easy, but we have more chance.“Our idea is to win, but if we can’t, then a draw is OK”“Every game is an opportunity to get three points for us.“Watching these games, on paper they were difficult. On paper these ones are ‘easier’, but every game is a challenge for us.“It is a difficult game but I’m confident we can win.”last_img read more

County officials expect to perform over 100 wedding ceremonies on Valentines Day

first_img Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Posted: February 14, 2018 February 14, 2018 Elizabeth Alvarez, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — County officials expect to perform over 100 wedding ceremonies Wednesday as couples look to tie the knot on Valentine’s Day.County staff will officiate weddings at Assessor/Recorder/Clerk’s offices downtown and in Chula Vista, El Cajon and San Marcos. Valentine’s Day usually comes with an uptick in marriage license filings, vow renewals and ceremonies, according to Ernie Dronenburg, the county assessor/recorder/clerk.“My wonderful team helps on average over 100 couples on Valentine’s Day and performs numerous ceremonies at our beautiful Waterfont Park alongside the historical downtown County Administration Center,” he said.Walk-ins will be accepted only at the County Administration Center. Appointments can be scheduled at 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. by calling (619) 237-0502. More information is available at www.sdarcc.com. Elizabeth Alvarez County officials expect to perform over 100 wedding ceremonies on Valentine’s Daylast_img read more

5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Thursday September 5 2019

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are 5 things to do in Wilmington on Thursday, September 5, 2019:#1) Wilmington Recreation Commission MeetingThe Wilmington Recreation Commission meets at 5pm in Town Hall’s Room 9. Read the agenda HERE.#2) Cub Scout Pack 136 Registration NightCub Scout Pack 136 is holding a Registration Night from 6pm to 8pm at the Friendship Lodge (Masonic Hall). Contact Troop Leader Frank West at troop136wilm@aol.com for additional information.#3) Lego Building At Wilmington Memorial LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is holding a Lego Building session from 3:45pm to 4:45pm. For kids in kindergarten and up. No registration required.#4) Board Game Club For Teens At Wilmington Memorial LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is holding a Teen Board Game Club Meeting from 6:30pm to 8:30pm. Looking to learn, play, or create fun board games? Bring your favorite game or latest prototype and we’ll play together. Students and their adults welcome, registration encouraged! Register HERE.#5) WCTV Sports Meet-UpInterested in being a part of the WCTV Wildcat Sports Team? Come to the WCTV Sports Meet-Up at 6pm at WCTV’s Studios (10 Waltham Street). WCTV is looking for play-by-play and camera operators for most sports this fall. This meet-up is a good way to meet WCTV staff and hear about opportunities to get involved at the station in a volunteer sports capacity. No prior experience needed. No time commitment. Work solo or as part of a crew. Can’t make it to the meet-up? Contact Marty McCue at marty@wctv.org to schedule a one-on-one visit.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday, September 9, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Wednesday, September 4, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Tuesday, September 3, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

After Controversy Over Condolence Calls Can Trump And The White House Refocus

first_img Share People get what is going on! https://t.co/Pdg7VqQv6M— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 21, 2017And Trump’s Twitter fingers were tested again Monday morning after Myeshia Johnson, the widow of Army Sgt. La David Johnson, who was one of the four killed in Niger, spoke out.The president “said that ‘he knew what he signed up for, but it hurts anyways,’” Johnson recounted on ABC’s Good Morning America. “It made me cry, because I was very angry at the tone of his voice and couldn’t remember my husband’s name.”Trump then said he had her husband’s name on a report in front of him, Johnson said, describing Trump as “stumbling on my husband’s name. That’s what hurt me most. He’s out there fighting for our country, why can’t you remember his name? … He was an awesome soldier.”She described herself as “very, very upset and hurt. It made me cry even worse.”Trump wasted no time defending his handling of the call and his use of Sgt. Johnson’s name, tweeting shortly after the interview:I had a very respectful conversation with the widow of Sgt. La David Johnson, and spoke his name from beginning, without hesitation!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 23, 2017Johnson’s funeral was Saturday. The interview and Trump’s response threaten to extend the controversy — which has been uncomfortable to see laid bare — for another week.Trump can’t seem to let it go, even as the controversy descended into one about race — again during this presidency — by the end of last week.Here was the way Midwin Charles, writing for Essence magazine, framed it Friday, for example:“At a time when Black women bury their sons and daughters as a result of gun violence, police brutality and service to this country, the lack of respect from this president is unbearable. Worse, he sets a dangerous precedent on how Black women should be perceived and treated in America.”Trump has the opportunity to refocus this week, as Panetta suggests is necessary, on other subjects important to him and the country — like the budget and a tax overhaul with a trip to Capitol Hill the president has set for Tuesday.There’s also the opioid epidemic; he’s said he’ll formally designate it a national emergency this week, although much remains unclear about the details of what that will mean.Trump heads to Capitol Hill to lobby Republicans, but can he move the ball on policy?NPR’s Susan Davis, congressional correspondent, writes:President Trump heads to Capitol Hill Tuesday to meet with Senate Republicans at their private weekly lunch. It is the first time Trump will attend the weekly lunch as president. Republicans are expected to plan out their fall agenda, with only seven legislative weeks remaining and a to-list that is growing.Republicans are sensitive to the fact that they haven’t delivered much in the way of legislative victories in the first year of full GOP control of Washington. While the president has foisted on to lawmakers a number of unanticipated items, like immigration legislation affecting so-called DREAMers and tougher sanctions on Iran, there is nothing more important to the GOP agenda than passing tax legislation before the end of the year.Republicans largely believe that enacting sweeping tax cuts for American businesses and families will inoculate the party from a feared backlash in the 2018 midterm elections over the party’s failures to make good on its promise to dismantle the Affordable Care Act.The president’s efforts to address the opioid crisis have come up short so far. Is anything substantively different with his declaration of a “national emergency”?NPR’s Tamara Keith, White House correspondent, who has covered the opioid crisis extensively, notes:President Trump says this week he will declare the opioid epidemic a national emergency. If he actually does it, Trump will be following through on a pledge he made more than two months ago.On Aug. 10, the president said, “This is a national emergency, and we are drawing documents now.” But there has been little sign since that the administration really was drawing up the documents.According to the latest numbers, nearly 150 Americans are dying each day from drug overdoses, the majority of those from heroin, fentanyl and other opioids.“My guess is, we’re going to see deaths go up than go down. I think we’re on the wrong side of curve here,” New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie recently said. He’s chairman of President Trump’s opioid commission, which is set to release a final set of recommendations Nov. 1.But, it is such a significant crisis that on July 31 the commission issued an interim report with a recommendation it described as urgent: that the president declare a national emergency, to free up resources and bring increased attention to something that every three weeks is killing as many people as died on Sept. 11.“Your declaration would empower your cabinet to take bold steps and would force Congress to focus on funding and empowering the Executive Branch even further to deal with this loss of life,” the commission report noted. “You, Mr. President, are the only person who can bring this type of intensity to the emergency and we believe you have the will to do so and to do so immediately.”Tackling the opioid crisis was a key Trump campaign promise. The question this week is whether he will follow through with action.Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Trump has an opportunity to refocus on the military with a Medal of Honor ceremony and to congressional priorities as he heads to Capitol Hill Tuesday.Updated Monday, Oct. 23 at 9:08 a.m. ETWhen backed into a corner, President Trump digs in and fights back.It’s what he’s done as president, it’s what he did as a candidate and it’s what he did as a businessman.Just go listen to NPR’s Embedded podcast and a recent episode about Trump’s fight with Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif., over things as petty as a flagpole at his golf course, putting hedges in front of houses he thought were ugly and the name of a road. He wanted his name on it.He had been greeted as something of a conquering hero in that town. But the relationship soured after lawsuits and threats. So much so that the Republican town that voted for John McCain in 2008 and Mitt Romney in 2012 went for Hillary Clinton in 2016.“I think the president has a bad habit when he’s asked a question that he is uncomfortable with or can’t quite come up with the right answer — he usually tries to reach out for scapegoats,” Leon Panetta, former defense secretary under President Obama and chief of staff to Bill Clinton, told NPR’s All Things Considered, “and the first scapegoat this president seems to always turn to is President Obama.“And when he talked about him not making calls that was a terrible mistake. And what bothers me is that it detracts from the main focus here, and the main focus has to be on the brave and courageous individuals that are willing to go out there and fight and die for America, and their families. There is some comfort here for all of this dispute, that maybe America again will take the time to remember that there are young men and women in uniform that are fighting and dying for this country. That’s something sometimes we tend to forget.”Part of the problem for Americans is the disconnect Panetta highlights between the military and the rest of society. In 1945, just before the end of World War II, there were 12 million active servicemembers. Now, there are just over a million or so.“They’re the best 1 percent this country produces,” White House Chief of Staff John Kelly said Thursday in his defense of President Trump in the White House briefing room.It’s actually less than 1 percent. That number in 1945 represented roughly 9 percent of the country’s total population. Now, the number of active-duty servicemembers is only about 0.4 percent of the population.“Most of you, as Americans, don’t know them,” Kelly continued. “Many of you don’t know anyone that knows any one of them.”Americans are far less engaged in the debate over worldwide American missions than they likely would be if they had a daughter or son or neighbor in the fight. That has to have an effect on American society and policymaking.Trump will look to highlight that sacrifice at a Medal of Honor ceremony at the White House Monday. He will honor retired Army Captain Gary M. Rose, who was a medic during Vietnam and saved a helicopter full of soldiers after it was shot down.But there are questions as to whether Trump can move on and keep his focus on where staff like Kelly would like it to be.Trump, for example, has shown no signs of wanting to move on from the fight with a Democratic congresswoman. Rep. Frederica Wilson of Florida revealed details of a conversation Trump had with a widow of one of the soldiers killed in Niger.I hope the Fake News Media keeps talking about Wacky Congresswoman Wilson in that she, as a representative, is killing the Democrat Party!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 21, 2017last_img read more

3 Questions Answered About The Planned Natural Gas Pipeline In Central Texas

first_imgThat confusion was on display at a pipeline meeting in Wimberley, where residents offered a list of questions about the project that was too long to read aloud, much less answer, before the meeting ended.Here are some of those questions, with answers from experts in the field.  Hicks spent part of the ’90s fighting this pipeline as a lawyer for landowners. Lesniak did as well, when he worked for the City of Austin. They both said the Longhorn line is a good example of how pipelines change over time.This pipeline started carrying crude oil from the west in the 1950s.“Then, in the mid-’90s, it switched from being a crude oil line to what’s called a hazardous liquids line,” Hicks said. “[It transported] jet fuel, gasoline, things like that.”“Then it switched again to being a crude oil line from West Texas to the Gulf Coast,” he said.Hicks was unable to get the Longhorn rerouted but he did help win concessions from the pipeline company, which replaced part of the line over environmentally sensitive areas.He said it shouldn’t require lawsuits to bring that level of oversight to the planning process.“The most obvious problem with pipeline oversight in Texas is they turn the job over to the private pipeline companies and let them choose their route,” he said. “There is no control by Texas government with people in Texas having no say at any stage over what route a pipeline can take.”That’s why he’d advise people in Hays County to get as many questions as they can answered both from the company and from their elected officials before construction starts. Share Salvador Castro for KUTResidents attend a community meeting in Wimberley last month to discuss a planned natural gas pipeline through Hays County.Houston-based Kinder Morgan hosted an open house in Hays County about its Permian Highway Pipeline, a natural gas pipeline the company plans to run through Central Texas.As often happens when a Texas pipeline is announced, many people in the project’s path were taken by surprise by the wide-sweeping powers the state grants pipeline companies. With no public engagement process required for routing and building a pipeline here, many residents feel left in the dark about how pipelines work, their potential risks and benefits and what rights landowners have when it comes to dealing with the company. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Why Do Pipeline Companies Have The Power To Take Land?The biggest battles over pipelines in Texas are fought over eminent domain, a company’s power to take land for a pipeline. That power is granted to companies because lawmakers believe they play a role in creating necessary infrastructure that is publicly available.“One of the ways I try to explain pipeline systems is to say this: When you turn on your gas stove to cook breakfast in the morning, you are literally turning the last valve in a pipeline system that probably starts out in West Texas or in South Texas,” said James Mann, a lawyer and lobbyist for pipeline companies.The fact that pipelines are so efficient at moving fossil fuels is also what makes them essential to the state’s oil and gas industry. Mann counts that as part of the public benefit that pipelines offer.But it’s an argument that may be getting harder to make as more of the oil and gas produced in the U.S. is shipped overseas instead of delivered to our cars and stovetops.“This pipeline, the Permian Highway Pipeline, a very large percentage of that gas – if not all of it – will be for export. Where’s the public good in that?” said Chuck Lesniak, who serves on the Liquid Pipeline Advisory Committee for the U.S. Department of Transportation. “Why should they have the right of eminent domain … for the profits of their shareholders?”The argument for a public benefit to oil and gas extraction is also being increasingly challenged by a growing “keep it in the ground” movement, which argues further extraction of fossil fuels will worsen the impacts of climate change.Are Pipelines Safe?At the Wimberley meeting, Marilyn and Marvin Zgabay shared a photo of a badly burned 7-year-old girl. It was taken decades ago at their family’s ranch in Rosenberg, Texas.Salvador Castro for KUTMarilyn and Marvin Zgabay hold an old photo of their daughter, Lauren, who was badly burned when a pipeline exploded under her grandfather’s Rosenberg ranch decades ago.Marilyn’s father had taken her daughter, Lauren, out to his pasture to look at the cows, when a natural gas line running under the property exploded.The two were separated in the explosion, and when Marilyn’s father found Lauren, she was pressed against a barbed-wire fence, but alive.  Zgaybay says she opposes the Permian Highway Pipeline because they’ve “experienced it.” The planned line would run near her property and over her son’s land in Fredericksburg.“We’re still in the blast area,” she said.The likelihood of a pipeline exploding is low, however. Industry often points out that pipelines are the safest and most efficient way to transport oil and gas. Lesniak thinks that may account for some of the leeway given to pipeline companies in planning their projects.But, he said he believes the risk of accidents should be given greater weight in regulation and oversight.“From a probability standpoint, it’s a very low-frequency-risk profile,” he said. “But the consequences are very, very high. Because when you do have an accident, it can be catastrophic because of the very high volumes of product that are transported.”That’s one of the reasons it’s important to know what is being transported in a pipeline. But that can change from year to year.What Materials Can Pipelines Carry?“I think a lot of people who don’t live here near the pipeline don’t know it’s here,” Renae Hicks said on a recent cold afternoon in South Austin.He’s referring to the Longhorn Pipeline, which runs under what he describes as a “highway of grass” that makes up the right-of-way.Salvador Castro for KUTThe Longhorn Pipeline runs through South Austin around the Onion Creek neighborhood and west through Circle C.center_img X 00:00 /04:05 Listenlast_img read more

Internet service provider Free has communicated it

first_imgInternet service provider Free has communicated its vehement opposition to parts of the French broadcasters’ plans for streaming platform Salto to the competition watchdog currently assessing the project, according to a report by Le Monde.According to the paper, Free has sent a letter to the Autorité de la Concurrence outlining its concerns about plans to offer the broadcasters’ live channels on the platform, in addition to video-on-demand.Le Monde reports that Free has denounced the plan to distribute the country’s main channels on the digital platform as the creation of a “cartel” that will disadvantage other distributors.According to Free, Salto, by providing a platform for channels that account for 80% of the national audience, will effectively have a stranglehold on access to them.Free is reportedly far from being assuaged by commitments recently made by the broadcasters to secure a regulatory green light for Salto. These concessions include providing access to the channels on a non-exclusive basis at non-discriminatory prices. However, according to the letter sent by the ISP, as cited by Le Monde, Free believes that the television groups will have a clear incentive to hike up the prices paid for carriage by Salto, giving them further leverage in negotiations with ISPs.Free’s opposition follows a bitter battle over several years between ISPs and commercial broadcasters TF1 and M6 over the terms of carriage for their channels. That dispute ended with a victory for the broadcasters, which were able to levy financial contributions from the ISPs in exchange for carriage of their channels and associated digital services.OTT TV platform Molotov has also expressed its opposition to the project, according to Le Monde. The OTT provider has reportedly compared the project to being akin to a combination of France’s three leading supermarket chains, Leclerc, Monoprix and Carrefour.Molotov has been in dispute with TF1 over its failure to strike a new deal to distribute the latter’s channels on its platform following the expiry of its previous agreement at the end of June.According to Le Monde’s report, other ISPs are either more sanguine or have declined to comment. Orange has asked the Autorité de la Concurrence to ensure that it will be able to distribute Salto without minimum guarantees. Bouygues Telecom, which declined the paper’s request for comment, has shared ownership with TF1, while Altice France/SFR, which also declined to comment, is currently demanding carriage fees for its own channels from rival ISPs.last_img read more