2G: Kanimozhi learns candle making in Tihar Jail

first_imgKanimozhi at the Patiala House court for the 2G trial in MayLodged in the assistant superintendent’s office in Tihar Jail in a cell especially created for her because of security reasons, Kanimozhi misses her 10-year-old son Adithyan the most. He is under the care of his grandmother Rajathi Ammal. She,Kanimozhi at the Patiala House court for the 2G trial in MayLodged in the assistant superintendent’s office in Tihar Jail in a cell especially created for her because of security reasons, Kanimozhi misses her 10-year-old son Adithyan the most. He is under the care of his grandmother Rajathi Ammal. She also misses her diamond nose-pin, an accessory she has sported since she was a little girl. She had sought permission to continue wearing it, saying she felt “improperly dressed” without it, but jail authorities did not allow it, or indeed any other jewellery.Adithyan visits her often, but not often enough, as jail rules allow visits by family members twice a week. That is the only time her calm cracks. “Once she broke down and kept saying sorry to her son”, disclosed a jail official who understands Tamil. Though the prisoners meet their families in ‘mulaqaat’ (meeting hall) with a glass shield in between, she was allowed to meet her son in the superintendent’s office because she wanted to hug him.Jail officials say Kanimozhi keeps to herself and does not interact much with other inmates. By various accounts, she appears to be an Orhan Pamuk fan. On May 20, when she was sent to jail, she carried a half-read My Name is Red with her. Museum of Innocence by the same author is keeping her company now. Kanimozhi spends her time reading and writing poetry. “She keeps writing something or the other and is completely immersed in it”, reveals a jail official. She was earlier lodged in ward number 8, which is called the ‘mulayaza’. It is a place where new inmates are lodged for the first six months to prevent them from interacting with the more hardened inmates. It is the only ward which has a spacious courtyard in the centre, where inmates can mingle with each other.advertisement”She is the calmest of the 2G lot and doesn’t make unreasonable demands”, says the jail official, referring to the other vvips lodged in Tihar for the 2G spectrum scam. They include former telecom minister and Kanimozhi’s party colleague A. Raja, the Balwa brothers, Unitech’s Sanjay Chandra, Karim Morani, Kalaignar tv’s managing director Sharath Kumar, senior bureaucrats and corporate executives.Till June 10, it was not very difficult for her or for the others in the 2G case to spend the day since they had daily hearings at Patiala House. They were out of the prison at 9 a.m. and returned around 6 in the evening. The day was spent in the air-conditioned CBI court, where the accused could meet their families. Now, with the courts closed for vacation till June 24, the day has to be spent in the jail.A jail official said that she once enquired about a beauty parlour on the premises. “She was told about one run by jail inmates which is free of cost, and the other run by Jawed Habib which costs money. She has not visited either yet”, the official saidlast_img read more

Xiaomi Redmi 6, Redmi 6A India launch tipped for September

first_imgXiaomi launched the Redmi 6 series of phones which include the Redmi 6, the Redmi 6A and the Redmi Note 6 in China recently. The Chinese OEM is now gearing up to bring two of the three Redmi phones to India very soon. A new report suggests that Xiaomi will be launching the Redmi 6 and the Redmi 6A in India in September. However, it is important to note that Xiaomi India is yet to confirm the launch timeline of the phones.According to a report from 91Mobiles, some industry sources have confirmed that the Redmi 6 and the Redmi 6A will be launching in India in the next two months. There is, however, no word whether Xiaomi will launch the Redmi Note 6 in India alongside the Redmi 6 and Redmi 6A in September. Xiaomi usually launches the Note device in a separate event, the scenario may be the same with the Redmi Note 6. Meaning, the Note 6 may launch in India later in the year.Alongside confirming the launch month of the Redmi 6 and the Redmi 6A, the new report also reveals that the both these devices will come with MediaTek processors. Now, that’s a disappointing news to hear. Considering, the Redmi 5 runs on Snapdragon 450 and Redmi 5A on Snapdragon 425, seeing the Redmi 6 and the Redmi 6A running on MediaTek processors is disappointing. Other specifications of the two phones are expected to be the same as the China models.In China, the Redmi 6, which is the successor to the Redmi 5, comes in two variants, one with 3GB RAM and 32GB of internal storage and the second one with 4GB RAM and 64GB of storage which is expandable via a microSD card. The Redmi 6 sports a 5.45-inch display with HD+ with a resolution of 1440 x 720 pixels and aspect ratio of 18:9. The smartphone comes with AI-powered dual camera setup on the back consisting of 12-megapixel primary sensor and 5-megapixel secondary sensor. On the front, the Redmi 6 sports a 5-megapixel sensor.advertisementThe Redmi 6 is powered by a 12nm-based MediaTek Helio P22 processor clocked at 2GHz. Redmi 6 comes in two variants — one with 3GB RAM and 32GB storage, while the second one comes with 4GB RAM and 64GB of internal storage. As for the pricing, the Redmi 6 comes with a starting price tag of 799 Yuan (roughly Rs 8,500) for the 3GB RAM model. The price of the high-end variant with 4GB RAM is launched for a price of 999 Yuan (roughly Rs 10,500).The Redmi 6A, on the other hand, is an ultra-affordable phone. The Redmi 6A has been launched in China for 599 yuan (roughly around Rs 6,000) which is interestingly same as the Redmi 5A India price. The Redmi 6A comes with a 5.45-inch display with 18:9 aspect ratio. The smartphone comes with a 12-megapixel camera on the back, while on the front, the phone includes a 5-megapixel selfie shooter. The Redmi 6A runs the latest MIUI 10-based on Android Oreo. On the hardware front, the Redmi 6A is powered by a 12nm-based MediaTek Helio A22 processor and is backed by a 3000mAh battery.last_img read more

9 months agoEx-Wolves midfielder Andrews slams Liverpool pair Sturridge, Shaqiri

first_imgEx-Wolves midfielder Andrews slams Liverpool pair Sturridge, Shaqiriby Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveFormer Wolves midfielder Keith Andrews was unimpressed by Liverpool for their FA Cup defeat on Monday.Andrews pulled no punches when looking back on the match and picked out Daniel Sturridge and Xherdan Shaqiri for particular criticism.Speaking to Off The Ball, Andrews said: “A few of those Liverpool players need to have a good look in the mirror after their performances, some of them were shocking, they’re fringe players and it shows they haven’t got the strength in depth.”There’s talk of Sturridge getting a new contract, but I don’t know where that’s come from.”Shaqiri only got going when the big boys came on, he was having a sulk up. Fabinho at the back, forget about it.“I wanted to bring up that issue from that game, I wasn’t watching it in depth, it was on at home, the first half, in particular, was horrendous.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

In 126 Years English Football Has Seen 13475 NilNil Draws

For his day job, James Curley, 36, is an assistant professor of psychology at Columbia University, working on the neuroendocrinological basis of social behavior. But in his downtime he tries to answer different kinds of mysteries: What was the first soccer game he ever went to? (He remembered the vague details, but not the specifics.) How often have his two favorite teams played each other over the last century? And is soccer really as dull as some people say?The answers to those questions were surprisingly difficult to find. But Curley used the same approach he uses in his academic career: data, lots and lots of data. By cobbling together game results from several different sources, he has compiled what is almost certainly the world’s biggest compendium of English football scores. Sitting on his GitHub page, devoid of any fanfare whatsoever, are the scores of nearly 200,000 English soccer games played in the top four leagues since 1888, the days of Jack the Ripper and Queen Victoria.1These games are from the English football “league” system. Currently, this encompasses the top four tiers of the English football pyramid, or 92 teams. These 14 megabytes can tell remarkable stories, dating back more than 125 years to the founding of the English football league.Take the most common final score, for example. In 188,060 league games,2For context, this is very similar to the total number of major league baseball games played since 1900. the final tally was most often 1-0, proof, for Curley, that soccer was as low-scoring as he suspected. This result has occurred in more than 30,000 games — 16 percent of the total. Other common scores: 2-1 (about 27,000 games), 2-0 (about 22,000) and 1-1 (about 22,000).In 85,694 games — dangerously close to half the total — at least one of the teams forgot to score at all. That led Curley to an answer for one of his questions: “Soccer is a bit dull,” he told me.Here is the distribution of home and away teams’ goal-scoring throughout history:Scores are likely to be low. In more than 85 percent of all games, neither team scored more than three goals.Those low scores help lead to thousands of draws — 47,412 since the foundation of the league system, to be exact. That’s more than a quarter of all games. And 7 percent of games overall have ended with no one scoring, and no one winning — there have been 13,475 nil-nil draws.In another testament to the sport’s “dullness,” draws have become more common over football’s long history. (Last season, 27 percent of games ended without a winner. ) This chart shows the prevalence of drawn games3Throughout, the year refers to the start of the season, e.g. 1950 refers to the 1950-1951 football season.:In 1890, just 12 percent of games were drawn, and in 1977, 626 games out of 2,028, or 31 percent, were draws. While this number is down slightly today, we’re near the historical high.That’s partly because of a decrease in scoring generally. As English soccer has wound its way through the decades, its scoring has withered. Here are the historical averages of goals scored per game, by league level: The average number of goals per game has at times wildly fluctuated, particularly with the sudden spikes and subsequent declines in the two postwar eras. In 1925, FIFA amended the offside rule. Prior to the change, three players had to be between an attacker and the goal when the ball was passed to him. The new rule changed this to two players (typically a defender and the goalkeeper), giving more leeway to attackers, and led to a dramatic, instant increase in scoring.The reasons for the other big shifts are less clear. Rule changes — the kinds of things that would usually explain variation in goals — are quite rare in soccer’s history.In 1958, substitutions were allowed for the first time, but only for an injured player. This roughly corresponds with the beginning of a steep decline in scoring in the 1960s. This could make for a plausible causal explanation: Perhaps playing with an injured player left teams extremely vulnerable on defense, leading to many goals. The addition of the substitute may have mitigated these effects.Other rules changes — the introduction of red and yellow cards in 1970, another tweak to the offside rule in 1990, banning goalkeepers’ handling of back-passes in 1992 — don’t seem to correlate with any major changes in scoring. In particular, the decline after 1930, and the rise after 1950, aren’t well explained. Some of these changes may be due to the evolution of football tactics, something that is laid out, for example, in Jonathan Wilson’s “Inverting the Pyramid.” In the early days, soccer featured a large number of forwards, but tactical changes led to a larger number of defensive and midfield players. The shifts in the game, and in the game theory of its tactics, may well have led to shifts in overall scoring.In 1981 there was a rule change of another type: To calculate standings, teams were given three points for a win and one point for a draw. Before 1981, only two points were awarded for a win. This change gave teams less incentive, generally, to settle for a draw. This could have led to more aggressive play, and more goals. However, the effect may not operate in just one direction. Once a team does score, that team has all the more incentive to shut the game down and hold out to win having scored just a goal. 1981 did indeed see a small jump in goals, and goal-scoring was elevated for a few years after.However, the change was not large and has not persisted. Goal-scoring seems to have reached something of an equilibrium in the past 30 years or so, corresponding with some of the lowest levels of scoring of the past 125 years.Curley’s reticent about how long his mammoth database took to put together. “I’m not sure I want to tell you, actually,” he joked, “Because then my wife would find out.”Curley is also quick to add that the data did exist elsewhere — although it’s typically scattered, proprietary, or hard to access. He assembled it from the webpages of the Rec.Sports.Soccer Statistics Foundation, from other compilers and GitHub users, from ESPN’s own database, and elsewhere, and made it freely available.“Because I believe in open access to data — I’m a strong advocate of that in science — I just generally have a view that if data is out there, and as long as it’s not owned by someone, then it’s good to have it out in the public,” he said. “I knew there were people who would enjoy it, so I thought, ‘Well, why not give it to them?’”Curley’s academic work and soccer work overlap. Much of his academic work, for example, is concerned with pairwise contest models — contests where two entities compete at a time — and social hierarchies. These issues are often tackled with formulae like the Elo system, which calculates soccer rankings. The parallel to his soccer hobby is obvious. Soccer games, after all, are pairwise contests.Other psychological concepts infused our discussion of soccer. Unlike most fans of English football, Curley roots for two teams. Aston Villa is nature — Curley’s father, and his father’s father, back 100 years, were season ticket-holders — York City is nurture. Conveniently, using the data set of his own creation, he can chart his two teams’ shared history, answering one of his questions. (“Fortunately, they’ve barely ever even crossed paths. So I’ve never had to choose.”)And like the academic he is, he’s performed a sort of peer review of other sources’ soccer data. Case in point, on Nov. 26, 1983, Doncaster Rovers played Chester to a 0-0 draw, in a fourth-tier match. This game is unknown even to ESPN’s database. But not to James Curley’s.“An appropriately completely dull game,” he said. And just one of 188,060.CORRECTION (Oct. 4, 5:30 p.m.): A footnote in an earlier version of this story misstated the number of teams in the top four tiers of the English football league system; there are 92 such teams, not 94. read more

Mike Adams the answer for Ohio State footballs offensive line

Ohio State football senior left tackle Mike Adams, who returns to the Buckeyes’ lineup on Saturday against No. 14 Nebraska, stands at 6-foot-8 and weighs in at 320-pounds, making him a sizeable asset to the team. With Adams set to make his first appearance for the team since the 2011 Sugar Bowl, suffice it to say that help is on the way for OSU’s beleaguered offensive line. Adams, along with DeVier Posey, Daniel “Boom” Herron and Solomon Thomas, were suspended for the Buckeyes’ first five games of the 2011 season for selling OSU football memorabilia in exchange for improper benefits in the form of tattoos. Posey and Herron will remain suspended for an additional violation, but Adams is listed on the Buckeyes’ depth chart as the starter for Saturday’s game at Memorial Stadium in Lincoln, Neb. Adams’ return couldn’t have come soon enough. After not allowing a single sack against Akron and Toledo in the Buckeyes’ first two games, the Scarlet and Gray offensive line has allowed 14 sacks against Miami (Fla.), Colorado and Michigan State. Quarterback play was scrutinized after last Saturday’s 10-7 loss to the Spartans, but the Buckeyes’ signal-callers were also sacked nine times. “Obviously, they (the offensive line) didn’t do a great job,” first-year OSU head coach Luke Fickell said after the game. “You don’t give your quarterback much of a chance when (they are) sacked nine times.” OSU linemen, including senior center Mike Brewster and redshirt sophomore Jack Mewhort, both said that Adams’ return is a relief. “It gives you a lot of motivation to come back tomorrow,” Mewhort said of Adams’ return. “We’re excited to have (him) back.” Excited could be an understatement. Adams, a three-year letter-winner and first team all-Big Ten selection in 2010, figures to help protect the freshman quarterback Braxton Miller and create a push for OSU’s running backs, who were held to 78 yards rushing against the Spartans. Brewster agreed with Mewhort. “I think it is really going to help us getting Mike back this week,” Brewster said. “He is going to be ready to go and had a great season last year for this team. I’m excited to see what he is going to be able to do against Nebraska.” Posey and Herron were originally scheduled to come off suspension with Adams in the game against the Cornhuskers. Offensive lineman Marcus Hall was also suspended along with Posey and Herron this week. Fickell said during a Tuesday press conference that while the new suspensions are a setback for the team, he won’t allow his players to complain or whine. “We have also got to look at the (players) we are getting,” he said. “So, you’ve got your Mike Adams and your Solomon Thomas, and you know, so, those are the things you’ve still got to focus on.” Based on comments Adams made during OSU football Media Day on Aug. 20, Adams is ready for action. “Everything that has happened has definitely left its stamp on the season, but we’re over that and I’m just ready to go out and play,” Adams said. “Personally, I’ve only got (seven) games left, so every time I come into the stadium, it puts chills down my back.” As for how Adams fits back into the offensive line, Brewster reiterated his return is a positive, saying the line will do whatever it takes to improve. “(Adams will) bring a lot of experience back,” Brewster said after Saturday’s loss. “(He’s a) great player. Really just going to look forward to Saturday.” Adams and the Buckeyes’ (3-2, 0-1) game against the No. 14 Cornhuskers (4-1, 0-1) will kick-off at 8 p.m. and be broadcast on ABC. read more

International recruiting an asset for Ohio State womens tennis

The OSU women’s tennis team currently has 4 international players occupying its roster in sophomore Ferny Angeles Paz (left), sophomore Miho Kowase, junior Grainne O’Neill and sophomore Gabriella De Santis.Credit: Whitney Wilson / Lantern reporterTraveling to America from a foreign country can be a big change, offering an unfamiliar culture with new languages and learning experiences for some international students.The Ohio State women’s tennis team (12-4, 5-0) has eight players on its roster. Only half of those players are from the United States. The other four have traveled thousands of miles from Peru, Japan, Ireland and Venezuela to become Buckeyes.Coach Melissa Schaub said she considers international players to be great assets for the team.“Tennis is a very international sport, so you see a lot of international players in college tennis,” Schaub said. “It is much more popular in other countries than it is here in the U.S. These girls have been traveling around the world since a young age playing tennis, which is something not every American gets to do.”She said it can be difficult selecting eight scholarship players who can easily adapt to the program.“Recruiting in general is probably one of the biggest aspects of our job,” Schaub said. “There are some really good international tournaments called the Orange Bowl and Eddie Herr where you get to see the international players but get to stay here in the U.S. Once you see what you’re looking for, then you will take a trip over there to meet their coach and their family before bringing them to the U.S. for a visit.”Schaub said the girls brought a lot of experience as far as tournaments and playing internationally. She said the four international players have been a great addition to the program as teammates who show support for one another.“We have a good mix of different players on our team, and the American kids get to have a little bit of culture,” Schaub said. “College athletics for any athlete is an amazing experience, but for the international players, it’s even more amazing in some ways because in most other countries it’s either you continue with school or you continue with tennis, and here they get to do both.”Sophomore Gabby De Santis from Venezuela said she would have been faced with that difficult decision in her home country. Santis added that one advantage of moving to America is learning about a new culture while continuing her tennis and academic careers.“It’s interesting to know different people that think in different ways,” Santis said. “It is much more competitive here than in Venezuela where I would not have had the opportunity to study and play at a collegiate level at the same time.”Sophomore Ferny Angeles Paz said her native country of Peru and the U.S. are different in many ways.“I’ve never played indoors in Peru. It is very different because we don’t have indoor courts,” Paz said. “It’s pretty tough here. Everyone is good, everyone practices hard, and every team is competitive, so it’s tough.”Japanese sophomore Miho Kowase said the opportunity to move to the U.S. has offered several difficulties and benefits beyond playing tennis.“It’s hard for me because my family is 13 hours time difference compared to America,” Kowase said. “My sister lives in Georgia, so that has really helped me adjust to living in America. Also, for me to learn English and being able to speak English is such a huge advantage in Japan.”Junior Grainne O’Neill from Ireland said Buckeye tradition is what has helped make her experience at OSU so gratifying.“It’s great, I feel like the whole Buckeye community really helped me out big time when I first moved here because I really did not know anything at all,” O’Neill said. “It’s just great to have people behind you. We have a whole team and our coaches and staff are great so they really have helped out big time. When we travel to different places you hear ‘O-H’ and ‘Go Bucks’ and that’s really nice.”With no seniors on the roster, all eight players are set to return next year for the 2015-16 season. In the meantime, the Buckeyes (12-4, 5-0) are set to take on Purdue on Friday in Columbus at 3 p.m. read more

Block O leader Mr Ohio State rallying the pack for one more

It’s an unusually breezy, cloudy Saturday morning in early September. Tents are lined up in the parking lot of the southwest entrance of Ohio Stadium.It’s the calm before the big storm: the Ohio State football team’s home opener vs. Hawaii.Within hours, the tents are filled with tailgaters covered in scarlet and gray or green and black resembling the team being cheered. Speakers are on, bumping hype music to prepare fans for intense cheering.Among the crowd, opposite the southwest entrance, is 23-year-old red-bowtie-wearing Isaac Oyer, also known as Mr. Ohio State. He acquired the nickname Mr. Ohio State after receiving screen time on national television during the OSU vs. Alabama Sugar Bowl game in January.“People I didn’t even know would message me. The amount of Twitter notifications, text messages and Facebook messages I got from people being like ‘dude you’re all over TV’ was unbelievable,” Oyer said. By 10 a.m on Saturday, Oyer was with his crew of friends joking around before leading his peers into the ‘Shoe for work. His job is more fun than tough. He’s the president of OSU’s Block “O” student section.“I’m in charge of basically the whole organization, making sure everyone is doing their job … and honestly just to make it the best experience we can for our student athletes,” Oyer said.Block “O” is the official student section of OSU athletics. The organization is made up of an executive board and committees for all sports teams.  Being from Springfield, Virginia, and in a brand new element in Columbus, Julia Schwabenbauer, a third-year in business, said Block “O” helped her get accustomed to life at OSU.“I didn’t know a lot of people coming from out of state, but standing in Block “O” I felt super-connected to the school,” Schwabenbauer said. “I became friends with everyone around me. It felt like home.”Becoming the president of Block “O” was unexpected for Oyer. With no family ties to OSU, he didn’t pay attention to Buckeye sports teams, nor did he ever see sports in his future, despite being a three-sport athlete in high school.“I actually wasn’t an Ohio State fan growing up in Columbus. Neither of my parents went to Ohio State. After coming here, I don’t know, Buckeye Nation takes over you,” Oyer said.He said his plan was always to attend OSU to get a degree in engineering so he could follow in his father’s footsteps, but his plan didn’t go accordingly.  “I wasn’t really doing well with my chemical engineering and chemistry classes. I was really struggling. (My) GPA was super low,” Oyer said.   After struggling with his then-major, he did some thinking as to where he’d want to end up later in life.“I never thought sports would be a thing, and even being in Block “O,” heavily involved in Block “O,” I never thought of sports. And then after struggling with engineering for so long and being into sports as I am, it clicked,” he said.Things clicked for Oyer when he realized he should get involved in the sports world. Step one, he said, was to change majors from engineering to classics as a way to have an easier courseload. The next step was to focus on Block “O” and gain experience with internships to get real-world experiences.“I knew a lot of people from the Blue Jackets, like in their front office, from playing hockey when I was like 5 or 6 years old … so I reached out to them and set up a meeting and kind of got me an internship with the Blue Jackets,” Oyer said.Michelle Bucklew, marketing director for Block “O,” said she sees excitement through her friend Oyer.“Obviously he gets a lot of TV time, but if you ever see him on TV, you know he’s excited about Ohio State, his job and what he’s doing,” said Bucklew, a fourth-year in marketing.Though Oyer is always in the frontlines leading the pack to cheer for OSU athletics, Bucklew said he has not yet joined the superfan ranks attained by fans such as “The Big Nut” and “Buck-I-Guy.”“I think he created an image for himself the last year or so, but I don’t know if it’s superfan material,” Bucklew said.All in all, Oyer said things have come full circle from his time as a high-school sophomore aspiring to be a general manager for a sports team to now.“It’s just nice doing something that I love,” he said. Block O president Isaac Oyer, also known by his nickname ‘Mr. Ohio State’, before OSU’s home opener against Hawaii on Sept. 12 at Ohio Stadium. Credit: Samantha Hollingshead / Photo Editor read more

Mens Basketball Ohio State relying on support for Kaleb Wesson in the

Ohio State sophomore forward Kyle Young (25) and sophomore forward Kaleb Wesson (34) defend against a member of South Carolina State’s basketball team during the first half of the game on Nov. 18. Ohio State won 89-61. Credit: Amal Saeed | Assistant Photo EditorIn Chris Holtmann’s first season as the head coach at Ohio State, he had Keita Bates-Diop and Jae’Sean Tate to rely on in the paint. Both players provided different styles offensively — Tate being the bruising, layup player down low and Bates-Diop having the ability to pull up, showing some production behind the 3-point line.However, both provided the size needed defensively to be a presence in the post, with Bates-Diop and Tate each averaging more than six rebounds per game in their final season with the Buckeyes. For much of the 2018-19 season, both offensive roles and tha major defensive post role has shrunk from two players to one: sophomore forward Kaleb Wesson. He leads the team in points, averaging 16.2 per game while only increasing his average time played by 3.8 minutes. His attempts from inside the 2-point line have increased to 7.8 per game, connecting on 58.4 percent. He’s increased his willingness to shoot from deep, averaging 2.1 attempts from 3 and connecting on 32.4 percent, a 13.24 percent increase from his freshman season. He’s a force in the paint as well, exceeding both his offensive and defensive rebound totals to two more per game than he averaged a season ago. Wesson is Ohio State’s main game plan and target. And it’s something that other teams are very aware of. “It’s also tough when there is a lot of teams that will post trap and double and stuff like that,” sophomore forward Kyle Young said. Post presence was something that Holtmann wanted and expected to carry over into his second season, despite the decrease in team size with the absence of Tate and Bates-Diop. But this is a job for more than one player. “We have to continue to grow that aspect of our guys’ games,” Holtmann said. “Andre is a guy that has shown an ability to do that, as has Kyle at times, not really something that Kyle has ever done, but he’s shown an ability to do it, and [freshman forward Jaedon LeDee]. I think there are multiple guys that we are trying to play through.” Especially in terms of rebounding, no player has come close to the nearly seven rebounds per game Wesson averages. Young, junior forward Andre Wesson and senior guard C.J. Jackson are the closest, averaging more than four per game. Holtmann said Andre Wesson is the next player on the roster expected to have a post presence, averaging career highs in both offensive and defensive rebounding this season. But when Kaleb Wesson has gone to the bench early on in the past few games due to foul trouble, Young has been the one who has stepped up, providing a consistent presence down low, especially offensively. In five Big Ten games, including four starts, the sophomore forward has only averaged 7.2 points per game, but has made 17 of 21 shot attempts from the field, an 81 percent success rate that is leaps and bounds better than anyone on the roster not named redshirt junior guard Danny Hummer, who had connected on the only shot he has attempted. Young has also made an impact on the boards, finishing second behind Kaleb Wesson with 4.6 rebounds against conference opponents. However, 10 of his 23 total rebounds against the Big Ten have been offensive boards. Young said he and Kaleb Wesson have developed a good relationship, coming into Ohio State in the same recruiting class. He said they have developed chemistry and have developed a better connection the more he got to know him both on and off the court. Now Young’s focus is on taking advantage of extending Ohio State’s presence in the paint, not leaving it only to one man. “I think we can continue to be more tough and physical, utilizing that game more inside, maybe looking to get to a move first instead of just getting it in and passing it out right away,” Young said. “We just need to keep working on it every day and it will get better.” read more

Benitez Newcastle determined to bounce back from shaky start

first_imgNewcastle United boss Rafael Benitez insists his side are determined to turn around their fortunes heading into Saturday’s trip to Crystal PalaceThe Magpies have just one point from their first five games of their Premier League campaign.Benitez’s recent defensive approach has been openly questioned by critics with Chelsea coach Maurizio Sarri admitting that he was surprised to see the Spaniard use such tactics.But Benitez insists that Newcastle will be going all-out to claim the three points at Selhurst Park this weekend.“We want to win. We want to get three points in every game, but especially after the start,” said Benitez on Chronicle Live.“We should be closer with these teams.Roberto Firmino, LiverpoolVirgil van Dijk praises Roberto Firmino after Liverpool’s win Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Virgil van Dijk hailed team-mate Roberto Firmino after coming off the bench to inspire Liverpool to a 3-1 comeback win against Newcastle United.“It will not be easy, but we have more chance.“Our idea is to win, but if we can’t, then a draw is OK”“Every game is an opportunity to get three points for us.“Watching these games, on paper they were difficult. On paper these ones are ‘easier’, but every game is a challenge for us.“It is a difficult game but I’m confident we can win.”last_img read more

County officials expect to perform over 100 wedding ceremonies on Valentines Day

first_img Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Posted: February 14, 2018 February 14, 2018 Elizabeth Alvarez, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — County officials expect to perform over 100 wedding ceremonies Wednesday as couples look to tie the knot on Valentine’s Day.County staff will officiate weddings at Assessor/Recorder/Clerk’s offices downtown and in Chula Vista, El Cajon and San Marcos. Valentine’s Day usually comes with an uptick in marriage license filings, vow renewals and ceremonies, according to Ernie Dronenburg, the county assessor/recorder/clerk.“My wonderful team helps on average over 100 couples on Valentine’s Day and performs numerous ceremonies at our beautiful Waterfont Park alongside the historical downtown County Administration Center,” he said.Walk-ins will be accepted only at the County Administration Center. Appointments can be scheduled at 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. by calling (619) 237-0502. More information is available at www.sdarcc.com. Elizabeth Alvarez County officials expect to perform over 100 wedding ceremonies on Valentine’s Daylast_img read more

5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Thursday September 5 2019

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are 5 things to do in Wilmington on Thursday, September 5, 2019:#1) Wilmington Recreation Commission MeetingThe Wilmington Recreation Commission meets at 5pm in Town Hall’s Room 9. Read the agenda HERE.#2) Cub Scout Pack 136 Registration NightCub Scout Pack 136 is holding a Registration Night from 6pm to 8pm at the Friendship Lodge (Masonic Hall). Contact Troop Leader Frank West at troop136wilm@aol.com for additional information.#3) Lego Building At Wilmington Memorial LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is holding a Lego Building session from 3:45pm to 4:45pm. For kids in kindergarten and up. No registration required.#4) Board Game Club For Teens At Wilmington Memorial LibraryThe Wilmington Memorial Library (175 Middlesex Avenue) is holding a Teen Board Game Club Meeting from 6:30pm to 8:30pm. Looking to learn, play, or create fun board games? Bring your favorite game or latest prototype and we’ll play together. Students and their adults welcome, registration encouraged! Register HERE.#5) WCTV Sports Meet-UpInterested in being a part of the WCTV Wildcat Sports Team? Come to the WCTV Sports Meet-Up at 6pm at WCTV’s Studios (10 Waltham Street). WCTV is looking for play-by-play and camera operators for most sports this fall. This meet-up is a good way to meet WCTV staff and hear about opportunities to get involved at the station in a volunteer sports capacity. No prior experience needed. No time commitment. Work solo or as part of a crew. Can’t make it to the meet-up? Contact Marty McCue at marty@wctv.org to schedule a one-on-one visit.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday, September 9, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Wednesday, September 4, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Tuesday, September 3, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

After Controversy Over Condolence Calls Can Trump And The White House Refocus

first_img Share People get what is going on! https://t.co/Pdg7VqQv6M— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 21, 2017And Trump’s Twitter fingers were tested again Monday morning after Myeshia Johnson, the widow of Army Sgt. La David Johnson, who was one of the four killed in Niger, spoke out.The president “said that ‘he knew what he signed up for, but it hurts anyways,’” Johnson recounted on ABC’s Good Morning America. “It made me cry, because I was very angry at the tone of his voice and couldn’t remember my husband’s name.”Trump then said he had her husband’s name on a report in front of him, Johnson said, describing Trump as “stumbling on my husband’s name. That’s what hurt me most. He’s out there fighting for our country, why can’t you remember his name? … He was an awesome soldier.”She described herself as “very, very upset and hurt. It made me cry even worse.”Trump wasted no time defending his handling of the call and his use of Sgt. Johnson’s name, tweeting shortly after the interview:I had a very respectful conversation with the widow of Sgt. La David Johnson, and spoke his name from beginning, without hesitation!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 23, 2017Johnson’s funeral was Saturday. The interview and Trump’s response threaten to extend the controversy — which has been uncomfortable to see laid bare — for another week.Trump can’t seem to let it go, even as the controversy descended into one about race — again during this presidency — by the end of last week.Here was the way Midwin Charles, writing for Essence magazine, framed it Friday, for example:“At a time when Black women bury their sons and daughters as a result of gun violence, police brutality and service to this country, the lack of respect from this president is unbearable. Worse, he sets a dangerous precedent on how Black women should be perceived and treated in America.”Trump has the opportunity to refocus this week, as Panetta suggests is necessary, on other subjects important to him and the country — like the budget and a tax overhaul with a trip to Capitol Hill the president has set for Tuesday.There’s also the opioid epidemic; he’s said he’ll formally designate it a national emergency this week, although much remains unclear about the details of what that will mean.Trump heads to Capitol Hill to lobby Republicans, but can he move the ball on policy?NPR’s Susan Davis, congressional correspondent, writes:President Trump heads to Capitol Hill Tuesday to meet with Senate Republicans at their private weekly lunch. It is the first time Trump will attend the weekly lunch as president. Republicans are expected to plan out their fall agenda, with only seven legislative weeks remaining and a to-list that is growing.Republicans are sensitive to the fact that they haven’t delivered much in the way of legislative victories in the first year of full GOP control of Washington. While the president has foisted on to lawmakers a number of unanticipated items, like immigration legislation affecting so-called DREAMers and tougher sanctions on Iran, there is nothing more important to the GOP agenda than passing tax legislation before the end of the year.Republicans largely believe that enacting sweeping tax cuts for American businesses and families will inoculate the party from a feared backlash in the 2018 midterm elections over the party’s failures to make good on its promise to dismantle the Affordable Care Act.The president’s efforts to address the opioid crisis have come up short so far. Is anything substantively different with his declaration of a “national emergency”?NPR’s Tamara Keith, White House correspondent, who has covered the opioid crisis extensively, notes:President Trump says this week he will declare the opioid epidemic a national emergency. If he actually does it, Trump will be following through on a pledge he made more than two months ago.On Aug. 10, the president said, “This is a national emergency, and we are drawing documents now.” But there has been little sign since that the administration really was drawing up the documents.According to the latest numbers, nearly 150 Americans are dying each day from drug overdoses, the majority of those from heroin, fentanyl and other opioids.“My guess is, we’re going to see deaths go up than go down. I think we’re on the wrong side of curve here,” New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie recently said. He’s chairman of President Trump’s opioid commission, which is set to release a final set of recommendations Nov. 1.But, it is such a significant crisis that on July 31 the commission issued an interim report with a recommendation it described as urgent: that the president declare a national emergency, to free up resources and bring increased attention to something that every three weeks is killing as many people as died on Sept. 11.“Your declaration would empower your cabinet to take bold steps and would force Congress to focus on funding and empowering the Executive Branch even further to deal with this loss of life,” the commission report noted. “You, Mr. President, are the only person who can bring this type of intensity to the emergency and we believe you have the will to do so and to do so immediately.”Tackling the opioid crisis was a key Trump campaign promise. The question this week is whether he will follow through with action.Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty ImagesPresident Trump has an opportunity to refocus on the military with a Medal of Honor ceremony and to congressional priorities as he heads to Capitol Hill Tuesday.Updated Monday, Oct. 23 at 9:08 a.m. ETWhen backed into a corner, President Trump digs in and fights back.It’s what he’s done as president, it’s what he did as a candidate and it’s what he did as a businessman.Just go listen to NPR’s Embedded podcast and a recent episode about Trump’s fight with Rancho Palos Verdes, Calif., over things as petty as a flagpole at his golf course, putting hedges in front of houses he thought were ugly and the name of a road. He wanted his name on it.He had been greeted as something of a conquering hero in that town. But the relationship soured after lawsuits and threats. So much so that the Republican town that voted for John McCain in 2008 and Mitt Romney in 2012 went for Hillary Clinton in 2016.“I think the president has a bad habit when he’s asked a question that he is uncomfortable with or can’t quite come up with the right answer — he usually tries to reach out for scapegoats,” Leon Panetta, former defense secretary under President Obama and chief of staff to Bill Clinton, told NPR’s All Things Considered, “and the first scapegoat this president seems to always turn to is President Obama.“And when he talked about him not making calls that was a terrible mistake. And what bothers me is that it detracts from the main focus here, and the main focus has to be on the brave and courageous individuals that are willing to go out there and fight and die for America, and their families. There is some comfort here for all of this dispute, that maybe America again will take the time to remember that there are young men and women in uniform that are fighting and dying for this country. That’s something sometimes we tend to forget.”Part of the problem for Americans is the disconnect Panetta highlights between the military and the rest of society. In 1945, just before the end of World War II, there were 12 million active servicemembers. Now, there are just over a million or so.“They’re the best 1 percent this country produces,” White House Chief of Staff John Kelly said Thursday in his defense of President Trump in the White House briefing room.It’s actually less than 1 percent. That number in 1945 represented roughly 9 percent of the country’s total population. Now, the number of active-duty servicemembers is only about 0.4 percent of the population.“Most of you, as Americans, don’t know them,” Kelly continued. “Many of you don’t know anyone that knows any one of them.”Americans are far less engaged in the debate over worldwide American missions than they likely would be if they had a daughter or son or neighbor in the fight. That has to have an effect on American society and policymaking.Trump will look to highlight that sacrifice at a Medal of Honor ceremony at the White House Monday. He will honor retired Army Captain Gary M. Rose, who was a medic during Vietnam and saved a helicopter full of soldiers after it was shot down.But there are questions as to whether Trump can move on and keep his focus on where staff like Kelly would like it to be.Trump, for example, has shown no signs of wanting to move on from the fight with a Democratic congresswoman. Rep. Frederica Wilson of Florida revealed details of a conversation Trump had with a widow of one of the soldiers killed in Niger.I hope the Fake News Media keeps talking about Wacky Congresswoman Wilson in that she, as a representative, is killing the Democrat Party!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 21, 2017last_img read more

3 Questions Answered About The Planned Natural Gas Pipeline In Central Texas

first_imgThat confusion was on display at a pipeline meeting in Wimberley, where residents offered a list of questions about the project that was too long to read aloud, much less answer, before the meeting ended.Here are some of those questions, with answers from experts in the field.  Hicks spent part of the ’90s fighting this pipeline as a lawyer for landowners. Lesniak did as well, when he worked for the City of Austin. They both said the Longhorn line is a good example of how pipelines change over time.This pipeline started carrying crude oil from the west in the 1950s.“Then, in the mid-’90s, it switched from being a crude oil line to what’s called a hazardous liquids line,” Hicks said. “[It transported] jet fuel, gasoline, things like that.”“Then it switched again to being a crude oil line from West Texas to the Gulf Coast,” he said.Hicks was unable to get the Longhorn rerouted but he did help win concessions from the pipeline company, which replaced part of the line over environmentally sensitive areas.He said it shouldn’t require lawsuits to bring that level of oversight to the planning process.“The most obvious problem with pipeline oversight in Texas is they turn the job over to the private pipeline companies and let them choose their route,” he said. “There is no control by Texas government with people in Texas having no say at any stage over what route a pipeline can take.”That’s why he’d advise people in Hays County to get as many questions as they can answered both from the company and from their elected officials before construction starts. Share Salvador Castro for KUTResidents attend a community meeting in Wimberley last month to discuss a planned natural gas pipeline through Hays County.Houston-based Kinder Morgan hosted an open house in Hays County about its Permian Highway Pipeline, a natural gas pipeline the company plans to run through Central Texas.As often happens when a Texas pipeline is announced, many people in the project’s path were taken by surprise by the wide-sweeping powers the state grants pipeline companies. With no public engagement process required for routing and building a pipeline here, many residents feel left in the dark about how pipelines work, their potential risks and benefits and what rights landowners have when it comes to dealing with the company. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Why Do Pipeline Companies Have The Power To Take Land?The biggest battles over pipelines in Texas are fought over eminent domain, a company’s power to take land for a pipeline. That power is granted to companies because lawmakers believe they play a role in creating necessary infrastructure that is publicly available.“One of the ways I try to explain pipeline systems is to say this: When you turn on your gas stove to cook breakfast in the morning, you are literally turning the last valve in a pipeline system that probably starts out in West Texas or in South Texas,” said James Mann, a lawyer and lobbyist for pipeline companies.The fact that pipelines are so efficient at moving fossil fuels is also what makes them essential to the state’s oil and gas industry. Mann counts that as part of the public benefit that pipelines offer.But it’s an argument that may be getting harder to make as more of the oil and gas produced in the U.S. is shipped overseas instead of delivered to our cars and stovetops.“This pipeline, the Permian Highway Pipeline, a very large percentage of that gas – if not all of it – will be for export. Where’s the public good in that?” said Chuck Lesniak, who serves on the Liquid Pipeline Advisory Committee for the U.S. Department of Transportation. “Why should they have the right of eminent domain … for the profits of their shareholders?”The argument for a public benefit to oil and gas extraction is also being increasingly challenged by a growing “keep it in the ground” movement, which argues further extraction of fossil fuels will worsen the impacts of climate change.Are Pipelines Safe?At the Wimberley meeting, Marilyn and Marvin Zgabay shared a photo of a badly burned 7-year-old girl. It was taken decades ago at their family’s ranch in Rosenberg, Texas.Salvador Castro for KUTMarilyn and Marvin Zgabay hold an old photo of their daughter, Lauren, who was badly burned when a pipeline exploded under her grandfather’s Rosenberg ranch decades ago.Marilyn’s father had taken her daughter, Lauren, out to his pasture to look at the cows, when a natural gas line running under the property exploded.The two were separated in the explosion, and when Marilyn’s father found Lauren, she was pressed against a barbed-wire fence, but alive.  Zgaybay says she opposes the Permian Highway Pipeline because they’ve “experienced it.” The planned line would run near her property and over her son’s land in Fredericksburg.“We’re still in the blast area,” she said.The likelihood of a pipeline exploding is low, however. Industry often points out that pipelines are the safest and most efficient way to transport oil and gas. Lesniak thinks that may account for some of the leeway given to pipeline companies in planning their projects.But, he said he believes the risk of accidents should be given greater weight in regulation and oversight.“From a probability standpoint, it’s a very low-frequency-risk profile,” he said. “But the consequences are very, very high. Because when you do have an accident, it can be catastrophic because of the very high volumes of product that are transported.”That’s one of the reasons it’s important to know what is being transported in a pipeline. But that can change from year to year.What Materials Can Pipelines Carry?“I think a lot of people who don’t live here near the pipeline don’t know it’s here,” Renae Hicks said on a recent cold afternoon in South Austin.He’s referring to the Longhorn Pipeline, which runs under what he describes as a “highway of grass” that makes up the right-of-way.Salvador Castro for KUTThe Longhorn Pipeline runs through South Austin around the Onion Creek neighborhood and west through Circle C.center_img X 00:00 /04:05 Listenlast_img read more

Internet service provider Free has communicated it

first_imgInternet service provider Free has communicated its vehement opposition to parts of the French broadcasters’ plans for streaming platform Salto to the competition watchdog currently assessing the project, according to a report by Le Monde.According to the paper, Free has sent a letter to the Autorité de la Concurrence outlining its concerns about plans to offer the broadcasters’ live channels on the platform, in addition to video-on-demand.Le Monde reports that Free has denounced the plan to distribute the country’s main channels on the digital platform as the creation of a “cartel” that will disadvantage other distributors.According to Free, Salto, by providing a platform for channels that account for 80% of the national audience, will effectively have a stranglehold on access to them.Free is reportedly far from being assuaged by commitments recently made by the broadcasters to secure a regulatory green light for Salto. These concessions include providing access to the channels on a non-exclusive basis at non-discriminatory prices. However, according to the letter sent by the ISP, as cited by Le Monde, Free believes that the television groups will have a clear incentive to hike up the prices paid for carriage by Salto, giving them further leverage in negotiations with ISPs.Free’s opposition follows a bitter battle over several years between ISPs and commercial broadcasters TF1 and M6 over the terms of carriage for their channels. That dispute ended with a victory for the broadcasters, which were able to levy financial contributions from the ISPs in exchange for carriage of their channels and associated digital services.OTT TV platform Molotov has also expressed its opposition to the project, according to Le Monde. The OTT provider has reportedly compared the project to being akin to a combination of France’s three leading supermarket chains, Leclerc, Monoprix and Carrefour.Molotov has been in dispute with TF1 over its failure to strike a new deal to distribute the latter’s channels on its platform following the expiry of its previous agreement at the end of June.According to Le Monde’s report, other ISPs are either more sanguine or have declined to comment. Orange has asked the Autorité de la Concurrence to ensure that it will be able to distribute Salto without minimum guarantees. Bouygues Telecom, which declined the paper’s request for comment, has shared ownership with TF1, while Altice France/SFR, which also declined to comment, is currently demanding carriage fees for its own channels from rival ISPs.last_img read more