Rescue of others trapped in Thai cave paused

first_imgPeople watch as an ambulance allegedly carrying some of the rescued boys leaving the military airport in Chiang Rai to a nearby hospital after taking passengers from a helicopter as divers evacuated some of the 12 boys and their coach trapped at Tham Luang cave in Khun Nam Nang Non Forest Park in the Mae Sai district of Chiang Rai province on 8 July 2018. Photo: AFPEfforts to extract the remaining boys who are trapped in a flooded Thai cave have been paused for at least 10 hours, the operation commander told reporters after six were rescued.”The next operation is not expected to start for at least another 10 hours,” rescue chief Narongsak Osottanakorn told reporters, as remaining members of the group remain trapped inside.last_img

Trumps UK visit turns to Brexit Huawei as protesters gather

first_imgPeople protest outside Buckingham Palace during the state visit of US president Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump to Britain, in London, Britain on 3 June. Photo: ReutersDonald Trump will plunge into Britain’s Brexit crisis on Tuesday and is likely to demand that prime minister Theresa May’s successor ban China’s Huawei from 5G networks as thousands of protesters mock the US president across London.Feted by Queen Elizabeth and heir prince Charles on the first day of his state visit to Britain, Trump turns to politics on Tuesday with talks in Downing Street, a news conference scheduled for 1245 GMT and a dinner that could include leaders of Brexit, such as Boris Johnson, the favourite to succeed May.Trump brings demands for the United States’ closest ally in Europe, including calls by his envoys for a tougher British stance towards telecoms giant Huawei Technologies Co Ltd .At a lavish banquet in Buckingham Palace, Trump praised the queen as “a great, great woman” and said the United States and United Kingdom shared an enduring alliance.”As we honour our shared victory and heritage, we affirm the common values that will unite us long into the future; freedom, sovereignty, self-determination, the rule of law and reference for the rights given to us by almighty God,” he said.The state visit, promised by May back in January 2017 when she became the first foreign leader to meet him after he took office, is cast as a chance to celebrate Britain’s “special relationship” with the United States, boost trade links and reaffirm security cooperation.But the collapse of May’s premiership over Brexit and Trump’s penchant for ignoring the conventions of modern diplomacy have made the trip one of the most unconventional state visits in recent British history.Before Air Force One even touched down on British soil, Trump praised Johnson, the former foreign secretary and leading Brexit campaigner, and advised a sharp exit from the European Union on 31 October with or without a deal.Trump also called for arch-Brexiteer Nigel Farage, a scourge of May’s ruling Conservative Party, to conduct talks with the EU.Brexit, Blimp and ChinaBrexit is the most significant geopolitical move for the United Kingdom since World War Two and if it happens, London will be more reliant on the United States as ties loosen with the other 27 members of the EU.Huawei will top talks in London after the British government appeared to defy Trump administration demands and allow the Chinese company a limited role in building 5G networks.”We’ve been clear: Our ask is that our allies and our partners and our friends don’t do anything that would endanger our shared security interests or restrict our ability to share sensitive information,” US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said.The Trump administration has told allies not to use Huawei’s 5G technology and equipment because of fears it would allow China to spy on sensitive communications and data. Huawei denies it is, or could be, a vehicle for Chinese intelligence.Britain’s so-called special relationship with the United States is an enduring alliance, but some British voters see Trump as crude, volatile and opposed to their values on issues ranging from global warming to his treatment of women.A giant inflatable blimp depicting Trump as a pouting baby in a diaper will fly outside the British parliament in London on Tuesday ahead of what is expected to be one of the city’s largest protests against a foreign leader.In central London, tens of thousands of protesters are expected to take part in a “Carnival of Resistance” later in the day to voice their opposition to the president. Among those taking part will be environmental activists, anti-racism campaigners and women’s rights protesters.While some Britons protest, May and Trump will hold a business breakfast at St James’ Palace with US firms such as Lockheed Martin Corp, JP Morgan Chase and Co, Goldman Sachs Group Inc, construction company Bechtel and cybersecurity and data analytics firm Splunk IncMay will present Trump with a framed reproduction of the Atlantic Charter, which hung on wartime prime minister Winston Churchill’s wall and set out principles of free trade and collective security that formed the basis of the postwar peace.As part of the visit, Trump will be given a tour of the Churchill War Rooms – a labyrinthine bunker-turned-museum underneath London, and he will take part in events to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the D-Day invasion of Normandy, which turned the course of the war.Trump, May and their spouses will also view a ceremonial copy of the American Declaration of Independence. For lunch, they will have crab followed by beef fillet, and a meringue-based pudding known as ‘Eton mess’.While Trump and May sit down to political talks inside May’s Downing Street office, Philip May and Melania Trump will attend a garden party and take a guided tour of the building.The US first lady will receive a tea set created by designer Emma Bridgewater from the prime minister and her husband.last_img read more

Norman Geisler theologian and prolific author dies at 86

first_img News Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email As Amazon burns, Vatican prepares for summit on region’s faith and sustainabilit … August 30, 2019 Catholicism Buddhist official tells police alleged abuse victim was exploring her sexuality Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,About the authorView All Posts Share This! By: Adelle M. Banks AMBankstw News • Photos of the Week Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.,Hispanic evangelical group offers to house migrant children in churches Share This! By: Adelle M. Banks AMBankstw By: Adelle M. Banks AMBankstwcenter_img Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email,Norman Geisler in 2013. Courtesy photo(RNS) — Theologian and Christian apologist Norman Geisler, the author of dozens of books and the co-founder of two seminaries, has died. He was 86.His family announced his death on Monday (July 1) on his website.“It is with great sadness that we share this news that Norm Geisler passed away peacefully this morning,” reads the brief statement. “He has left behind an amazing legacy that will continue to have a ripple effect for many years to come.”In April, Southern Evangelical Seminary near Charlotte, North Carolina, announced Geisler was retiring from his teaching duties “due to health reasons.” Geisler co-founded that seminary in 1992.SES President Richard Land said Geisler influenced him as a seminary student in the early 1970s.“Dr. Geisler has been the ‘go to’ authority for more than two generations of evangelical seminary students who were looking for a bold, erudite, and uncompromisingly faithful defense of the inerrant, infallible Word of God and the historical doctrines of the Christian faith,” Land wrote in a tribute at The Christian Post. “His ministry was invaluable, and his influence incalculable.”Norman Geisler in 2004. Courtesy photoA philosopher and longtime defender of conservative Christian beliefs, Geisler founded the International Society of Christian Apologetics in 2006. Two years later, he co-founded Veritas Evangelical Seminary, a school in Santa Ana, California, now known as Veritas International University, according to the school’s history.The author of a four-volume set of books on systematic theology, Geisler spoke regularly at SES’ National Conference on Christian Apologetics. In the 1970s and 1980s, he was a prominent nationwide debater on topics ranging from abortion to creationism to the existence of God.In 1984, he appeared in a debate with Rabbi Harold Kushner over the question in the title of Kushner’s book, “Why Do Bad Things Happen to Good People?”William C. Roach, president of the International Society of Christian Apologetics, recalled Geisler’s contributions to Christian theology in a blog post on Monday.“In an era of church history when theology is in chaos, and the church is being shaken at its very core, and reality seems to be tossed to-and-fro with every wave of the sea,” Roach wrote, “we are grateful for the example of Dr. Geisler who stood as a beacon of truth shining forth in the midst of a dark world.”Roach added that Geisler was “much more than a scholar”; he was also a man who practiced what he preached. Roach, an adjunct professor at several institutions, including Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, recalled that the theologian would lend his car and a room of his home to people in need and “sing goofy Johnny Cash songs with his grandchildren.”A tweet from Defending Inerrancy, an initiative of scholars who believe the Bible is without error, described Geisler as the “greatest champion of full biblical inerrancy” in the last quarter of the 20th century and the first quarter of the 21st.Fellow Christian apologist Ravi Zacharias mourned the death of Geisler. Zacharias said that Geisler had been his professor in the 1970s and remained a mentor in the following years.“I owe more to him than anyone else for teaching me how to do apologetics for the Christian worldview,” Zacharias said in a tweet. “His death is a loss beyond words.” Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Email Tagsbiblical inerrancy homepage featured Norman Geisler obituary Ravi Zacharias Richard Land Southern Evangelical Seminary theologian,You may also like Instagram apostasy stirs controversy over Christian ‘influencers’ August 30, 2019 Adelle M. Banks Adelle M. Banks, production editor and a national reporter, joined RNS in 1995. An award-winning journalist, she previously was the religion reporter at the Orlando Sentinel and a reporter at The Providence Journal and newspapers in the upstate New York communities of Syracuse and Binghamton.,Add Comment Click here to post a comment Adelle M. Banks AMBankstw Share This! Photos of the Week August 30, 2019 Share This! Facebook Twitter Pinterest LinkedIn ReddIt Emaillast_img read more

California Blazes Are Part Of A Larger And Hotter Picture Fire Researchers

first_img Share The speed and ferocity of the wildfires raging through Northern California’s wine country have caught many residents off guard and left state officials scrambling to contain the flames.But for fire researchers, these devastating blazes are part of a much larger pattern unfolding across the Western United States. So far this year, fires in the U.S. have consumed more than 8.5 million acres — an area bigger than the state of Maryland.“We’re definitely pushing one of the largest fire years this decade,” said Jennifer Balch, a fire ecologist at the University of Colorado, Boulder.The cause is hot, dry conditions nationwide. Heat records have been broken this year in California, Oregon and Montana. Globally, 2017 is among the hottest years on record, thanks in part to human-induced climate change.Wildfires are natural phenomena, and linking any one fire to climate change is difficult if not impossible. Nevertheless, “there is a link between a warmer, drier climate and wildfires,” Balch said. For example, today’s fire season is three months longer than it was in the 1970s, she says. Annually, there are far more large fires nationwide than there used to be.“It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that forests burn when it’s warm and dry, and we’ve seen more of those years recently,” said John Abatzoglou of the University of Idaho.This year has been “pretty impressive,” he said. “I’m in Northern Idaho, and we had smoke coming from British Columbia and Oregon and California.”In the case of the wine country blazes in Napa and Sonoma, Abatzoglou said a sequence of events set up the wildfires. A wet spring caused the hills to grow thick with grasses and shrubs. That foliage then died and dried out over the hottest summer in California history.Then came unusually strong fall winds, which were not climate-related. The winds caused small fires to grow extremely quickly. “Everybody from firefighters down to homeowners has commented on just how incredibly fast the fires were moving,” said Max Moritz, a researcher at the University of California, Santa Barbara. “That’s really a wind-related phenomenon.”There are things that can be done to reduce the fire threat. Earlier this year, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke issued a call for more aggressive actions to suppress fires. He encouraged land managers nationwide to clear potential fuel sources, such as dead trees, and expand the clearings along roads to create stronger firebreaks.But Balch and others say these actions are only part of the solution. As fires become more common — and humans build farther into natural landscapes prone to fire — more must be done to protect communities.California has been leading the way in developing regulations to protect against fires, Moritz said. The state fire agency, Cal Fire, has produced fire hazard maps. In high-risk zones, there are building requirements such as fire-resistant roofs and window screens that can block embers from floating into a home.But Moritz points out that the hazard maps exclude urban areas. There, local municipalities have their own building codes, which can be less stringent than Cal Fire’s.He said that more urban areas might need to incorporate fire planning into their communities. That could mean building homes differently or improving evacuation and shelter options for residents. “Almost annually, we’re seeing large, large numbers of homes being lost in big fire events,” Moritz said. “Maybe we need to update our perspective.”Balch said that while the big picture of drought and climate provides some answers about the situation in Napa, the details of individual fires matter. That’s why after the latest wildfires in California burn out, she and other researchers will begin to study exactly what happened.“There are lots of really important questions that we as a scientific community have to answer,” she said. “Particularly when homes are burned and people’s lives are threatened or lost.”last_img read more