Military Will Manage Even as Infrastructure Scrapes By Conger Says

first_imgWashington — The nation’s defense infrastructure has not been adequately maintained for the past several years as the Pentagon diverts funds for installation support to higher priority readiness needs, but the military will be able to cope even if the stringent budget caps forcing officials to skimp on facility needs continue through the end of the decade, the department’s top installations official said this week at the 2015 Defense Communities National Summit.“We’ve done this before and survived it,” said John Conger, acting assistant secretary of defense for energy, installations and environment, referring to a similar situation in the 1990s.“It takes years for buildings to crumble,” Conger said. DOD’s investment in facilities that occurred before the department was forced to tighten its belt two years ago provided a base that should sustain it while its buildings are allowed to deteriorate.Of course, budgets for military construction and facility sustainment, restoration and modernization would continue to remain constrained as long as the budget caps stay in place, he said. Both of those accounts are being funded at reduced levels. DOD only requested $5 billion for milcon in fiscal 2016; several years ago, the account received $14 billion.As recently as five years ago, the department would request funding to fulfill 90 percent of the department’s estimated facility sustainment needs. The current year’s budget only allocates 70 percent of its facility sustainment requirements, said Conger.“We’re just spreading it thin,” he said.Beyond facilities, another of the panelists on the Summit’s “Defense Communities at a Crossroads” session predicted a dramatic change to the size of the Air Force over the next several years under the Budget Control Act. The service could shrink by 30 to 40 percent, according to Mackenzie Eaglen, a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.Lawmakers almost certainly will find common ground on a budget deal to relax the caps on defense spending for FY 2016, Eaglen added. The primary question is the exact amount of relief Congress offers the Pentagon. The number likely will be larger than the 2013 Ryan-Murray deal which provided DOD an extra $22 billion for FY 2014, she said.“They’re going to get to some number eventually,” Eaglen said. Dan Cohen AUTHORlast_img read more

Verizon Announces Price Increases For Wilmington Fios Customers

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Town Manager Jeff Hull recently notified residents of upcoming Fios TV consumer pricing increases, slated to happen on or after September 1, 2018.These changes include:The Fios Local TV Service package will increase from $12.99 to $25.00 per monthThe Fios Quantum Gateway Router Rate will increase from $10.00 to $12.00 per monthThe monthly rental rates for the Set Top Box (STB) will change based on the number of STBs a subscriber rents. Subscribers will only be charged for up to five STBs. The monthly rental rate for the first two STBs will be $12 each per month, and the monthly rental rate for the third, fourth and fifth STBs will be $6 each per month. There will be no monthly charge for additional STBs.Verizon will notify subscribers of these increases by “bill messages” beginning on or after July 1.New rates may not become effective on certain subscriber accounts until current discounts expire.Selectman Chair Kevin Caira was quick to point out that the Selectmen nor the Town have any say over price or offering changes.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSELECTMEN NOTEBOOK: 6 Things That Happened At This Month’s Selectmen’s MeetingIn “Government”News & Notes From WCTV: WCTV Executive Director Shaun Neville Answers YOUR QuestionsIn “Community”SELECTMEN NEWS: 5 Things That Happened At This Week’s MeetingIn “Government”last_img read more

Dinosaurtimes cockroach caught in amber from Myanmar

first_img More information: VRŠANSKÝ, P. & BECHLY, G. (2015): New predatory cockroaches (Insecta: Blattaria: Manipulatoridae fam.n.) from the Upper Cretaceous Myanmar amber. – Geologica Carphatica, 66(2): xx-yy (early view: DOI: 10.1515/geoca-2015-0015 ). PDF: http://www.bernstein.naturkundemuseum-bw.de/odonata/Vrsansky+Bechly_2015.pdf This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Mico Tatalovic in New Scientist said that “This exotic, praying-mantis-like cockroach that lived at the same time as dinosaurs was caught in amber about 100 million years ago. It is part of a new family of extinct predatory cockroaches that hunted at night.”Dragos Mitrica in ZME Science said the insect was found at a mine in Noije Bum, Myanmar. “The specimen was one of many found in the area, and is related to today’s praying mantises. Out of all the predatory cockroach lineages that evolved in the Cretaceous, only praying mantises survive today.”Big predatory dictyopterans are represented mostly by praying mantises (Mantodea), which can be derived from extinct cockroaches. The authors described “the holotype specimen of a new species belonging to a morphologically-deviant new family.”They said this species was probably a pursuit predator, “filling a niche previously not exploited by extinct cockroaches.”The specimen was collected in a quarry in the Hukawng valley. The cockroach was found trapped in amber.The specimen was studied with a Leica M80 stereo microscope. They observed a male cockroach with detached right mid and hind femora. Its elongated head and large eyes were protruding beyond the head outline. All the leg segments were described as “extremely elongated and covered with dense setation (short trichoid hairs – sensilla chaetica).”As for the body, they wrote that “the preserved body length is about 4.5 mm, width is difficult to measure, but the body is very wide as in standard cockroaches (over 2 mm), a little narrower basally, pale, with black lateral maculas.”In their discussion section, the authors said that they endorsed “a reclassification of Dictyoptera, in which the order Mantodea is phylogenetically subordinate within the Corydioidea (=Polyphagoidea) – a superfamily that includes diverse extant but also extinct cockroaches sometimes placed within Dictyoptera but outside the standard order of cockroaches.”They said that the absence of spines on the walking legs suggested that this species was an active runner and pursuit predator, which evolutionarily lost the passive protection of spines.The authors felt that “the erection of a new family” was well justified as a result of “the unique habitus with numerous autapomorphies along with several plesiomorphies.”Vrsansky is from the Geological Institute, Slovak Republic; Bechly is from the State Museum of Natural History in Stuttgart, Germany.Vrsansky said in New Scientist that the specimen was one of dozens of preserved insects found in the area, making it the most important site of dinosaur-age amber in the world. Tatalovic wrote, “Many large pieces of amber contained complete adult insects, which should help reconstruct the history of the animals and their ecosystem.” © 2015 Phys.org Citation: Dinosaur-times cockroach caught in amber, from Myanmar (2015, May 1) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-05-dinosaur-times-cockroach-caught-amber-myanmar.html Explore further Manipulator modificaputis gen. et sp. n. (Manipulatoridae fam.n.) holotype SMNS Bu-116 (deposited in the Stuttgart Museum of Natural History) from the Cretaceous Myanmar amber. A – left view, B – dorsal view, C – detail on the forewing articulation, D – forewing surface hexagonal structure. Scales 0.5 mm. Credit: Geologica Carphatica, doi:10.1515/geoca-2015-0015 The invasive Turkestan cockroach is displacing the oriental cockroach in the southwestern US Geologica Carpathica has a paper on a new family of predatory cockroaches. Predatory? The authors, Peter Vrsansky and Günter Bechly, from the Slovak Republic and Germany, respectively, said that “unique adaptations such as strongly elongated extremities and freely movable head on a long neck suggest that these animals were pursuit predators.”last_img read more