11 security personnel injured in IED blast in Jharkhand

first_imgEleven personnel of the CRPF and the State police were injured in an IED blast triggered by Naxals in Jharkhand’s Seraikela Kharsawan district in the early hours of Tuesday, officials said.The blast took place around 5 a.m. when a joint team of the CRPF’s special jungle warfare unit, Commando Battalion for Resolute Action (CoBRA), and the State police was carrying out an operation in the forests of Kuchai area in the district, they said.According to officials, the improvised explosive device (IED) is suspected to have been buried under the dirt track. The injured troops, eight of the CoBRA and rest belonging to the State police, have been airlifted to Ranchi, they said.The joint team was being led by the 209th battalion of the CoBRA of the CRPF deployed in the State for anti-Naxal operations, officials said.last_img read more

Rene Catalan gets chance to bring gold medal for PH anew in SEA Games

first_imgPDEA chief backs Robredo in revealing ‘discoveries’ on drug war ‘Rebel attack’ no cause for concern-PNP, AFP Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Catalan assured that his decision to represent the country won’t serve as a stumbling block to his journey to a ONE world title.ONE has always been supportive of their athletes’ dreams of representing their country and Catalan’s case is no exception.“I had to ask the authorities regarding this decision. I can still accept a fight until October before I turn my focus to the SEA Games,” Catalan said. “They granted my request because I am ready from August to October, and then the competitions would only run ‘til December.”“Now that I have this chance to give a gold medal to the Philippines again, I can’t really say no.”Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Sarangani joins MPBL MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew Catalan’s stint with the wushu national team ended prematurely after he was forced to retire and give way to younger athletes despite being in his prime years at that time.That’s why he just can’t wait to show that he still has a lot left in him.“I was just starting in wushu back then. I had dreams of becoming a ten-time wushu champion and to bring home numerous gold medals to the Philippines, but I had no other choice because they’re the authority (the Wushu Federation of the Philippines),” he said.“I felt bad. I was in the peak of my powers, but they forced me to retire from the wushu team. They were seeing how much I sacrificed, but it fell on deaf ears.”As for his flourishing MMA career, Catalan is on a six-fight winning streak after scoring a first-round stoppage of Yoshitaka Naito in ONE: Reign of Valor two months ago.ADVERTISEMENT PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games PLAY LIST 03:07PH billiards team upbeat about gold medal chances in SEA Games05:25PH boxing team determined to deliver gold medals for PH00:45Onyok Velasco see bright future for PH boxing in Olympics00:50Trending Articles02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games03:04Filipino athletes share their expectations for 2019 SEA Games02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:36Manny Pacquiao part of 2019 SEA Games opening ceremonycenter_img View comments Two-day strike in Bicol fails to cripple transport Catholic schools seek legislated pay hike, too Rene Catalan. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMANILA, Philippines—Opportunities keep knocking on Rene Catalan’s door.On his way to getting a world title shot in ONE Championship, Catalan is also set to represent the Philippines anew in the Southeast Asian Games in November.ADVERTISEMENT The 40-year-old Catalan look to add more SEA Games medals more than a decade since earning his last in 2005 when he took home the gold in wushu.Only this time, Catalan will be competing in a different sport of combat sambo.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logistics“It’s been 14 years. I am just so happy to be given the opportunity to represent the Philippines once again,” he said.“Ever since I was a kid, my main goal has always been to give honor to my country. Now I have another opportunity to bring home a gold medal to the Philippines.” Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue LATEST STORIES Private companies step in to help SEA Games hostinglast_img read more

SRC Encourages Persons to Use Its Standardisation Services

first_imgThe Scientific Research Council (SRC) is encouraging persons to utilise their standardisation services in food product development.“If you have a product that you have been developing at home for a while, and you have interest in commercialising that product, we are able to take you through the steps, applying a scientific process to ensure that you can get a standardised product that is consistent for the consumer,” Food Product Development Team Leader at the SRC, Valmo Wynter, said at a JIS ‘Think Tank’ today (April 6).He said that standardisation allows you to produce at a consistent quality, and also allows the entrepreneur to do a proper costing of the product.For his part, Executive Director of the SRC, Dr. Cliff Riley, emphasised that to compete on the international market, products must be of a certain quality.He added, further, that the Council’s pilot plant is Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved, so utilising these services gives entrepreneurs better access to international markets.The Executive Director outlined that “at the SRC, our paramount thrust is stimulating job creation and, in turn, stimulating economic growth in Jamaica using science and technology”.He highlighted the creativeness of Jamaicans, referring to the common site of motorised handcarts or bicycles with engines on Jamaican roads.“How do we capture that creativity and move it towards products that are standardised, which can be scaled, which can be reproduced and which are acceptable globally,” he said.“When you come in to us with your idea, and we discuss those ideas with you, our team of scientists will work with you to ensure you develop high-quality products,” Dr. Riley said.Meanwhile, Manager, Food Research and Development unit at the SRC, Dr. Chara Watson, said “you can formulate, you can develop, you can make your product, but is it market-ready; that is where the SRC comes in”.“We get you from the idea stage to a commercially viable product with the required quality and safety standard for market,” Dr. Watson said.last_img read more

Allergic reactions trigger changes in brain behavior development in unborn males and

first_img Source:http://www.medschool.umaryland.edu/news/2019/Allergic-Reactions-Play-Role-in-Sexual-Behavior-Development-in-Unborn-Males-and-Females-UMSOM-Research-Shows.html Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 29 2019Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and colleagues at Ohio State University have discovered that allergic reactions trigger changes in brain behavior development in unborn males and females. This latest brain development discovery will ultimately help researchers better understand how neurological conditions can differ between men and women.It is the first study to assess the response of a type of immune cell called a mast cell, linked to allergic responses, to determine if these cells play a role in sexual behavior development.”Many mental health and neurological disorders show a sex bias in prevalence, this latest research shows that inflammatory events, like allergic reactions, early in life may influence males and females differently due to underlying sex differences in the neuro immune system,” said Margaret McCarthy, PhD, Professor of Pharmacology and Chair of the Department of Pharmacology, whose lab conducted the research that was initiated by Dr. Katherine Lenz, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at Ohio State UniversityRelated StoriesNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injuryNanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellRush University Medical Center offers new FDA-approved treatment for brain aneurysmsThese findings, which were published in Scientific Reports, illustrate that immune cells are involved in the process of brain sexual differentiation, and that prenatal allergic inflammation can impact this crucial process in both sexes. This finding is another discovery that will ultimately help researchers understand behavioral development differences between males and females.How Allergic Reactions Impact Sexual BehaviorResearchers tested the sexual differentiation in rats that were exposed to an allergic reaction while still in utero. They induced an allergic reaction to egg whites in pregnant rats, and results of the study showed the allergic reaction impacted behavior changes in the offspring. Male rats showed less male sexual behavior as adults and adult females behaved more like male rates.The research tracked mast cells, which are known for their role in allergic responses. Researchers sought to determine if exposure to an allergic response of the pregnant female in utero would alter the sexual differentiation of the offspring and result in sociosexual behavior in later life.”This research shows that early life allergic events may contribute to natural variations in both male and female sexual behavior, potentially via underlying effects on brain-resident mast cells,” said Dr. McCarthySexual differentiation takes place in the early life process and it is directed by sex chromosomes, hormones and early life experiences. What this research showed is that immune cells residing in the brain such as microglia and mast cells, are more numerous in the male than female rat brains, and these cells play a critical role in brain development.last_img read more

Educational program for preschoolers successful in instilling heart healthy behaviors

first_img Source:https://www.acc.org/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Apr 22 2019Preschoolers in an underserved community who took part in a health promotion educational program aimed at establishing health behaviors showed a 2.2-fold increase in knowledge, attitudes and habits compared to their classmates who did not take part in the program, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.Earlier research suggests preschool-based interventions offer promise to instill healthy behaviors in children and these early prevention strategies may contribute to reducing heart disease later in life. Some researchers believe these strategies may eventually contribute to reducing the global burden of heart disease.Related StoriesStudy explores role of iron in over 900 diseasesTeam approach to care increases likelihood of surviving refractory cardiogenic shockRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaThe researchers in the FAMILIA trial enrolled 562 children from 15 Head Start preschools in Harlem, New York, to determine the impact of a health promotion educational intervention in a diverse, underserved community. Children randomized to the intervention took part in a four-month educational program to instill healthy behaviors using topics such as diet, physical activity, understanding how the human body and heart work, and emotions. Children in the control group continued to receive the standard curriculum.The researchers then looked at the change from baseline in overall knowledge, attitudes and habits (KAH) score of the children at five months. Children in the intervened schools showed an improvement 2.2-fold higher in KAH scores toward a healthy lifestyle, with the highest effect found in children who received 75 percent or more of the curriculum. The researchers found physical activity and body/heart awareness components, as well as knowledge and attitudes, were the main drivers of the effect.last_img read more

Google case set to examine if EU data rules extend globally

first_imgIn this April 17, 2007, file photo exhibitors of the Google company work in front of a illuminated sign at the industrial fair Hannover Messe in Hannover, Germany. Google is taking its legal fight against an order requiring it to extend “right to be forgotten” rules to its search engines globally to Europe’s top court. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer, File) Google is going to Europe’s top court in its legal fight against an order requiring it to extend “right to be forgotten” rules to its search engines globally. Google invokes free speech in French fine appeal The technology giant is set for a showdown at the European Union Court of Justice in Luxembourg on Tuesday with France’s data privacy regulator over an order to remove search results worldwide upon request.The dispute pits data privacy concerns against the public’s right to know, while also raising thorny questions about how to enforce differing legal jurisdictions when it comes to the borderless internet.The two sides will be seeking clarification on a 2015 decision by the French regulator requiring Google to remove results for all its search engines on request, and not just on European country sites like google.fr.Google declined to comment ahead of the hearing. Its general counsel, Kent Walker, said in a blog post in November that complying with the order “would encourage other countries, including less democratic regimes, to try to impose their values on citizens in the rest of the world.””These cases represent a serious assault on the public’s right to access lawful information,” he added.In an unusual move, the court has allowed a collection of press freedom, free speech and civil rights groups to submit their opinions on the case. These groups agree with Google that forcing internet companies to remove website links threatens access to information and could pave the way for censorship by more authoritarian regimes such as China, Russia and Saudi Arabia.The court’s ruling is expected within months. It will be preceded by an opinion from the court’s advocate general.The case stems from a landmark 2014 Court of Justice ruling that people have the right to control what appears when their name is searched online. That decision forced Google to delete links to outdated or embarrassing personal information that popped up in searches of their names.Authorities are now starting to worry about the risk that internet users can easily turn to proxy servers and virtual private networks to spoof their location, allowing them to dig up the blocked search results.Google said in its most recent transparency report that it has received requests to delete about 2.74 million web links since the ruling, and has deleted about 44 percent of them.Not all requests are waved through. In a related case that will also be heard Tuesday, the EU court will be asked to weigh in on a request by four people in France who want their search results to be purged of any information about their political beliefs and criminal records, without taking into account public interest. Google had rejected their request, which was ultimately referred to the ECJ. Explore furthercenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Citation: Google case set to examine if EU data rules extend globally (2018, September 10) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-09-google-case-eu-globally.htmllast_img read more

NASA Set To Launch a DeepSpace Atomic Clock Tonight

first_img Follow Kasandra @KassieBrabaw. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook. Fusion Powered Spacecraft Could Be Just A Decade Away NASA is set to launch an incredible new atomic clock into orbit on a Falcon Heavy today (June 24) in a technology demonstration mission that could transform the way humans explore space. The Deep Space Atomic Clock, developed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, is a space-ready upgrade to the atomic clocks we use here on Earth and to the clocks that already fly on satellites like those that provide GPS. Ideally, this new atomic clock will make spacecraft navigation to distant objects in space — on the journey to Mars, for example — more autonomous, NASA said in a statement. The precision in measurement of the spacecraft’s position that scientists hope to get with the Deep Space Atomic Clock will allow spacecraft traveling in deep space to act on their own, without much communication with Earth. It’d be a huge improvement to how spacecraft are currently navigated, NASA said. AdvertisementHow to Build the Most Accurate Atomic Clocks | VideoResearchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology use laser-cooled cesium atoms to develop ultra-accurate atomic clocks for GPS systems, global telecommunications and other essential technologies.Volume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65777-nasa-launching-deep-space-atomic-clock.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0005:0005:00Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball02:27Robotic Arms01:09Robots to the Rescue关闭  How NASA’s Mars 2020 Rover Will Work (Infographic) Related: This Is What 2 Dozen Satellites Look Like Packed for Launch on a SpaceX Falcon Heavy But how does it work? Astronomers already use clocks to navigate in space. They send a signal to the spacecraft, which sends it back to Earth. The time of that round trip tells scientists the spacecraft’s distance from Earth. That’s because the signal is traveling at the speed of light, so armed with the time it took to go to the spacecraft and back, finding distance is but a simple calculation away. By sending multiple signals over time, scientists can calculate a spacecraft’s trajectory — both where it was and where it’s going. But in order to know a spacecraft’s location within a small margin of error, astronomers need very precise clocks that can measure billionths of a second, according to NASA. They also need clocks that are extremely stable. “Stability” here refers to how consistently a clock measures a unit of time. While you’d think that clocks always measure the same length of time as a “second,” clocks have a tendency to drift and slowly mark longer and longer times as a “second.” For measuring the locations of spacecrafts in distant space, astronomers need their atomic clocks to be consistent to better than a billionth of a second over days and weeks. Modern clocks, from those we wear on our wrists to those used on satellites, most often keep time using a quartz crystal oscillator. These take advantage of the fact that quartz crystals vibrate at a precise frequency when voltage is applied to them, NASA said in the statement. The vibrations act like the pendulum in a grandfather clock. But, by the standards of space navigation, quartz crystal clocks aren’t very stable at all. After six weeks, they may be off by a full millisecond, which translates at the speed of light to 185 miles (300 kilometers). That much error would have a huge impact on measuring the position of a fast-moving spacecraft, NASA said. Atomic clocks combine quartz crystal oscillators with certain types of atoms to create better stability. NASA’s Deep Space Atomic Clock will use mercury atoms and be off by less than a nanosecond after four days and less than a microsecond after 10 years. It would take 10 million years for the clock to be wrong by a whole second, according to NASA. Related: A NASA Atomic Clock on SpaceX’s Next Falcon Heavy Will Pioneer Deep-Space Travel Tech It may not be surprising to learn that atomic clocks take advantage of the structure of atoms, which are composed of a nucleus of protons and neutrons surrounded by electrons. The atoms of each element have a distinct structure, with a different number of protons in the nucleus. While the number of electrons each type of atom has can vary, the electrons occupy distinct energy levels, and a jolt of exactly the right amount of energy can cause an electron to jump to a higher energy level around the nucleus. The energy required to make an electron do this jump is unique to each element and consistent to all atoms of that element. “The fact that the energy difference between these orbits is such a precise and stable value is really the key ingredient for atomic clocks,” Eric Burt, an atomic clock physicist at JPL, said in the statement. “It’s the reason atomic clocks can reach a performance level beyond mechanical clocks.” Humans To Mars? Here’s What We’ll NeedDava Newman, NASA Deputy Administrator, explains how solar-electric propulsion, deep space atomic clocks, spacesuits, and laser communication are key technologies for humans to explore Mars and beyond.Credit: NASAVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Better Bug Sprays?01:33关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65777-nasa-launching-deep-space-atomic-clock.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0002:3202:32Your Recommended Playlist01:33Better Bug Sprays?04:24Sperm Whale Befriends Underwater Robot01:08Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?00:29Robot Jumps Like a Grasshopper, Rolls Like a Ball02:27Robotic Arms01:09Robots to the Rescue关闭  NASA Wants Robots to Sniff Out Moon Pits for Astronaut Homes In essence, atomic clocks can correct themselves. In an atomic clock, the frequency of the quartz oscillator is transformed into the frequency that is applied to a collection of atoms from a specific element. If the frequency is correct, it will cause many electrons in the atoms to jump energy levels. But if it’s not, fewer electrons will jump. That tells the clock that the quartz oscillator is off-frequency and how much to correct it. On the Deep Space Atomic Clock, this correction is calculated and applied to the quartz oscillator every few seconds. But that’s not all that makes the Deep Space Atomic Clock special. This clock doesn’t just use mercury atoms, it also uses charged mercury ions. Because ions are atoms that have electric charge, they can be contained in an electromagnetic “trap.” This keeps the atoms from interacting with the walls of a vacuum chamber, a common problem with the neutral atoms used in regular atomic clocks. When they interact with the vacuum walls, environmental changes such as temperature can cause changes in the atoms themselves, and lead to frequency errors. The Deep Space Atomic Clock won’t be subject to such environmental changes, according to NASA, and so will be 50 times more stable than the clocks used on GPS satellites. After the clock launches today, scientists will be able to begin testing the clock’s precision as it spends days, then months in orbit. The Deep Space Atomic Clock will launch from Kennedy Space Center in Florida on a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket as one of two dozen payloads. The 4-hour launch window opens at 11:30 p.m. EDT (0330 June 25 GMT); visit Space.com tomorrow for complete coverage of the launch.last_img read more

Bigger and better exhibition

first_imgYam showing the limited-edition two-litre dry bags for the first 500 daily visitors. Perfect Livin’ is back for a second time in Kuching with more choices for visitors. Southern & Eastern Region , Sarawak KUCHING: Perfect Livin’, the nation’s top home and lifestyle exhibition, is back for a second time in Kuching with a bigger selection of products and brands for visitors.Organised by i.Star Ideas Factory Sdn Bhd, the four-day event at Borneo Convention Centre Kuching features 300 booths with about 150 exhibitors offering products and services for home furnishing, renovation and decorating needs.“After the first exhibition in April, we are back for a second time with more variety for customers to choose from.“A lot of new furniture and electrical products have been brought in to show Kuching customers what’s new in the market now. AdChoices广告“Brands such as LG and Joven, which were not here in April, are available this time. Our long-time partners, including Panasonic, Alpha, Samsung and Standard Kitchen, continue to be here,” i.Star Ideas Factory events, sales and marketing head Janice Yam said. Metro News 19 Apr 2019 A premier home and lifestyle exhibition Metro News 20 Apr 2019 Expo draws the crowd Related Newscenter_img Tags / Keywords: She also said this was a good time for customers to buy products as many exhibitors were having their mid-year sales.In addition, she said the FavePay cashless payment service was now accepted at Perfect Livin’.“This is the first time we are partnering with FavePay to offer customers extra rebates if they use it,” Yam said.Some 30,000 to 40,000 visitors are expected to visit over the four days, generating an estimated sales revenue of RM15 to 20mil.The first 500 visitors each day will receive a limited-edition Perfect Livin’ two-litre dry bag, with several colours available.As usual, there are guaranteed gifts for purchases of RM500 and above. Those who spend a minimum of RM1,000 will be in the running to win cash vouchers as well as a Robam cooker hob worth RM1,600. For families, a children’s colouring contest will be held at 2pm on Saturday and Sunday.“There is usually good response for this in Kuching and the children come fully equipped for the contest,” Yam said.Perfect Livin’ is open from 10am to 9pm until Sunday. For more information, go to www.perfectlivin.com Related News Metro News 26 Apr 2019 Great deals for the festive season {{category}} {{time}} {{title}}last_img read more