County officials expect to perform over 100 wedding ceremonies on Valentines Day

first_img Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Posted: February 14, 2018 February 14, 2018 Elizabeth Alvarez, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — County officials expect to perform over 100 wedding ceremonies Wednesday as couples look to tie the knot on Valentine’s Day.County staff will officiate weddings at Assessor/Recorder/Clerk’s offices downtown and in Chula Vista, El Cajon and San Marcos. Valentine’s Day usually comes with an uptick in marriage license filings, vow renewals and ceremonies, according to Ernie Dronenburg, the county assessor/recorder/clerk.“My wonderful team helps on average over 100 couples on Valentine’s Day and performs numerous ceremonies at our beautiful Waterfont Park alongside the historical downtown County Administration Center,” he said.Walk-ins will be accepted only at the County Administration Center. Appointments can be scheduled at 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. by calling (619) 237-0502. More information is available at www.sdarcc.com. Elizabeth Alvarez County officials expect to perform over 100 wedding ceremonies on Valentine’s Daylast_img read more

OBITUARY Donald Stephen Tucker 87

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Donald Stephen Tucker, age 87, a long-time resident of Wilmington, passed away peacefully with his wife Marguerite at his side on January 19, 2019.Donald was born in Worcester, MA on March 8, 1931; he was the dear son of the late Edward and Agnes Tucker. Donald was raised in Worcester; he attended Upsala Street School in Worcester, Clarke School in Northampton, and Worcester Trade High School in Worcester.Donald was an exceptional athlete in basketball and baseball. He was inducted into the New England Athletic Association of the Deaf Basketball Hall of Fame in 1982.In 1954, Donald married the “love of his life” Marguerite (Beauregard) Tucker; the couple moved to Worcester, Springfield, Agawam, and then Wilmington (1964) where they raised their family. Donald was a very devoted and loving husband, father and grandfather.Donald was known to be a man of great faith and wisdom; he was a member of St. Thomas of Villanova Church in Wilmington and Sacred Heart Church in Newton for many years.Donald was also a hard worker and a life-long wood patternmaker. Donald was creative, artistic and articulate about his work. In later years, he owned his own pattern shop in his garage.Donald was always helping others and was pro-active in his causes; he was one of the co-founders of the Massachusetts State Association of the Deaf and was their first secretary/treasurer. He volunteered at the New England Homes for the Deaf in Danvers, the Learning Center in Framingham and in later years was a part-time DeafBlind provider.Donald will be fondly remembered for his wonderful sense of humor, his easy-going personality and for his love of America and its principles of freedom.Donald was a great guy who would do anything to help anyone; he loved his family and friends unconditionally and with all his heart. Donald will forever be missed by those who knew and loved him.Donald was the beloved husband of Marguerite I. (Beauregard) Tucker of Wilmington, devoted father of Stephen G. Tucker of Wilmington, James E. Tucker of Middletown, MD and Maryjean Tucker of Swampscott. Loving grandfather of Bradford Tucker of Baltimore, MD and Claire Tucker of St. Paul, MN. Cherished son of the late Edward J. and Agnes (Mara) Tucker, dear brother of the late Agnes (Tucker) McGrath & her late husband Paul, the late Jean (Tucker) Kravsow & her late husband Irving, the late Edward Tucker, and Robert Tucker of Vernon, CT & his late wife Madeline Tucker. Donald was also survived by many nieces, nephews, and friends.Family and friends will gather at the Nichols Funeral Home, 187 Middlesex Ave. (Rte. 62), Wilmington, MA on Friday, January 25th for Visitation from 10:00-11:45 a.m. followed by a Mass of Christian Burial in St. Thomas of Villanova Church, 126 Middlesex Ave., Wilmington, MA. Interment will follow in Wildwood Cemetery, Wilmington, MA.In lieu of flowers, donations in Donald’s memory may be made to Maryland School for the Deaf Foundation, P. O. Box 636, Frederick, MD 21705, msd-foundation.org or to the New England Homes for the Deaf, 154 Water St., Danvers, MA 01923, nehd.org.Donald Tucker(NOTE: The above obituary is from Nichols Funeral Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: Raymond J. Spahl, 86In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Donald R. Donahue, 80In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: James Thayer Hastings, 84In “Obituaries”last_img read more

Alaska News Nightly Tuesday March 12 2019

first_imgStories are posted on the APRN news page. You can subscribe to APRN’s newsfeeds via email, podcast and RSS. Follow us on Facebook at alaskapublic.org and on Twitter @AKPublicNewsMurkowski’s public lands bill becomes lawLiz Ruskin, Alaska Public Media – Washington D.C.President Trump has signed into law a massive public lands bill that Sen. Lisa Murkowski has spent years compiling and negotiating.Memos detail gaps in ANWR science; Interior says they’ll guide future workLiz Ruskin, Alaska Public Media – Washington D.C.An environmental group today published 18 leaked memos by government scientists that outline gaps in knowledge about the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.Cash-strapped state of Alaska takes aim at North Slope government’s oil moneyRavenna Koenig and Nat Herz, Alaska’s Energy DeskA proposal by Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy would strip the North Slope Borough of its power to collect nearly $400 million in property taxes from oil companies each year. The idea gets at a longstanding question: How much money from oil should stay in the North Slope, where it’s pumped from the ground?Kaiser eyes Nome from White Mountain, with a hungry Ulsom on his tailBen Matheson, KNOM – NomeBethel musher Pete Kaiser is 77 miles from his first Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race victory. But first he must hold off the race’s defending champion hungry for a repeat win.House and Senate both look at what budget cuts to make amid Dunleavy proposalAndrew Kitchenman, KTOO – JuneauThe Legislature is weighing how deeply it wants to cut the state budget. And it must decide how to respond to Governor Mike Dunleavy’s proposals for full permanent fund dividends and paying back PFD cuts from the past three years.Bill seeks to require jail time in cases similar to 2018 Justin Schneider assaultAndrew Kitchenman, KTOO – JuneauSoldotna Republican Sen. Peter Micciche, the bill sponsor, says the measure would prevent a case like that of Justin Schneider from happening again.Search continues for pilot missing northwest of AnchorageAssociated PressThe Army National Guard says it’s continuing to search for a pilot missing since last week.Fairbanks City Council fails to overturn mayor’s veto of anti-discrimination ordinanceRobyne, KUAC – FairbanksThe Fairbanks City Council failed to override the mayor’s veto of a controversial civil rights ordinance at their meeting last night. The council then discussed re-working it and trying again in a couple of months. And they did not yet work on a version to put on the municipal ballot in October.State plans to sell Sheldon Jackson Museum in cost-cutting effortsEnrique Perez de la Rosa, KCAW – SitkaThe state Division of Alaska Libraries, Archives, and Museums announced late last week that it is looking to sell the Sheldon Jackson Museum.last_img read more

California Blazes Are Part Of A Larger And Hotter Picture Fire Researchers

first_img Share The speed and ferocity of the wildfires raging through Northern California’s wine country have caught many residents off guard and left state officials scrambling to contain the flames.But for fire researchers, these devastating blazes are part of a much larger pattern unfolding across the Western United States. So far this year, fires in the U.S. have consumed more than 8.5 million acres — an area bigger than the state of Maryland.“We’re definitely pushing one of the largest fire years this decade,” said Jennifer Balch, a fire ecologist at the University of Colorado, Boulder.The cause is hot, dry conditions nationwide. Heat records have been broken this year in California, Oregon and Montana. Globally, 2017 is among the hottest years on record, thanks in part to human-induced climate change.Wildfires are natural phenomena, and linking any one fire to climate change is difficult if not impossible. Nevertheless, “there is a link between a warmer, drier climate and wildfires,” Balch said. For example, today’s fire season is three months longer than it was in the 1970s, she says. Annually, there are far more large fires nationwide than there used to be.“It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that forests burn when it’s warm and dry, and we’ve seen more of those years recently,” said John Abatzoglou of the University of Idaho.This year has been “pretty impressive,” he said. “I’m in Northern Idaho, and we had smoke coming from British Columbia and Oregon and California.”In the case of the wine country blazes in Napa and Sonoma, Abatzoglou said a sequence of events set up the wildfires. A wet spring caused the hills to grow thick with grasses and shrubs. That foliage then died and dried out over the hottest summer in California history.Then came unusually strong fall winds, which were not climate-related. The winds caused small fires to grow extremely quickly. “Everybody from firefighters down to homeowners has commented on just how incredibly fast the fires were moving,” said Max Moritz, a researcher at the University of California, Santa Barbara. “That’s really a wind-related phenomenon.”There are things that can be done to reduce the fire threat. Earlier this year, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke issued a call for more aggressive actions to suppress fires. He encouraged land managers nationwide to clear potential fuel sources, such as dead trees, and expand the clearings along roads to create stronger firebreaks.But Balch and others say these actions are only part of the solution. As fires become more common — and humans build farther into natural landscapes prone to fire — more must be done to protect communities.California has been leading the way in developing regulations to protect against fires, Moritz said. The state fire agency, Cal Fire, has produced fire hazard maps. In high-risk zones, there are building requirements such as fire-resistant roofs and window screens that can block embers from floating into a home.But Moritz points out that the hazard maps exclude urban areas. There, local municipalities have their own building codes, which can be less stringent than Cal Fire’s.He said that more urban areas might need to incorporate fire planning into their communities. That could mean building homes differently or improving evacuation and shelter options for residents. “Almost annually, we’re seeing large, large numbers of homes being lost in big fire events,” Moritz said. “Maybe we need to update our perspective.”Balch said that while the big picture of drought and climate provides some answers about the situation in Napa, the details of individual fires matter. That’s why after the latest wildfires in California burn out, she and other researchers will begin to study exactly what happened.“There are lots of really important questions that we as a scientific community have to answer,” she said. “Particularly when homes are burned and people’s lives are threatened or lost.”last_img read more

Lynching Memorial and Museum in Alabama Draw Crowds Tears

first_imgBy BETH J. HARPAZ, AP Travel EditorTears and expressions of grief met the opening of the nation’s first memorial to the victims of lynching April 26 in Alabama.Hundreds lined up in the rain to get a first look at the memorial and museum in Montgomery.The National Memorial for Peace and Justice commemorates 4,400 Black people who were slain in lynchings and other racial killings between 1877 and 1950. Their names, where known, are engraved on 800 dark, rectangular steel columns, one for each U.S. county where lynchings occurred.This photo shows a bronze statue called “Raise Up,” part of the display at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, a new memorial to honor thousands of people killed in lynchings, launched April 26 in Montgomery, Ala. The memorial and an accompanying museum that open this week in Montgomery are a project of the nonprofit Equal Justice Initiative, a legal advocacy group in Montgomery. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)A related museum, called The Legacy Museum: From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration, is opening in Montgomery.Many visitors shed tears and stared intently at the commemorative columns, many of which are suspended in the air from above.Toni Battle drove from San Francisco to attend. “I’m a descendant of three lynching victims,” Battle said, her face wet with tears. “I wanted to come and honor them and also those in my family that couldn’t be here.”Ava DuVernay, the Oscar-nominated film director, told several thousand people at a conference marking the memorial launch to “to be evangelists and say what you saw and what you experienced here. … Every American who believes in justice and dignity must come here … Don’t just leave feeling like, ‘That was amazing. I cried.’ … Go out and tell what you saw.”As for her own reaction, DuVernay said: “This place has scratched a scab. It’s really open for me right now.”Angel Smith Dixon, who is biracial, came from Lawrenceville, Ga., to see the memorial.“We’re publicly grieving this atrocity for the first time as a nation. … You can’t grieve something you can’t see, something you don’t acknowledge. Part of the healing process, the first step is to acknowledge it.”Part of a statue depicting chained people is on display at the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, a new memorial to honor thousands of people killed in racist lynchings. The national memorial aims to teach about America’s past in hope of promoting understanding and healing. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)The Rev. Jesse Jackson, a longtime civil rights activist, told reporters after visiting the memorial that it would help to dispel America’s silence on lynching.“Whites wouldn’t talk about it because of shame. Blacks wouldn’t talk about it because of fear,” he said.The crowd included White and Black visitors. Mary Ann Braubach, who is White, came from Los Angeles to attend. “As an American, I feel this is a past we have to confront,” she said as she choked back tears.DuVernay, Jackson, playwright Anna Deavere Smith, the singing group Sweet Honey in the Rock, Congressman John Lewis and other activists and artists spoke and performed at an opening ceremony Thursday night that was by turns somber and celebratory.Among those introduced and cheered with standing ovations were activists from the 1950s Montgomery bus boycott, Freedom Rider Bernard Lafayette, and one of the original Little Rock Nine, Elizabeth Eckford.“There are forces in America today trying to take us back,” Lewis said, adding, “We’re not going back. We’re going forward with this museum.”Singer Patti Labelle ended the evening with a soulful rendition of “A Change is Gonna Come.”Other launch events include a “Peace and Justice Summit” featuring celebrities and activists like Marian Wright Edelman and Gloria Steinem in addition to DuVernay.The summit, museum and memorial are projects of the Equal Justice Initiative, a Montgomery-based legal advocacy group founded by attorney Bryan Stevenson. Stevenson won a MacArthur “genius” award for his human rights work.The group bills the project as “the nation’s first memorial dedicated to the legacy of enslaved black people, people terrorized by lynching, African Americans humiliated by racial segregation and Jim Crow, and people of color burdened with contemporary presumptions of guilt and police violence.”Several thousand people gave Stevenson a two-minute standing ovation at a morning session of the Peace and Justice Summit. Later in the day, Edelman, founder of the Children’s Defense Fund, urged the audience to continue their activism beyond the day’s events on issues like ending child poverty and gun violence: “Don’t come here and celebrate the museum … when we’re letting things happen on an even greater scale.”last_img read more

AFRO Community Calendar

first_imgJuly Black Power Happy HourThursdays this Month Come fellowship with Baltimore’s grassroots leaders while supporting a local, Black owned business. This a great way to network, learn and build with great Black minds around Baltimore! Also get in on Thursday happy hour deals. The night will include a featured performance by internationally known and respected spoken word artist, Lady Brion. Located at the Capital Lounge at 1531 Pennsylvania Ave, Baltimore, Md., from 6-8p.m.*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***Sat., July 20Winecream Tour and TastingEnjoy a tour of Crossroad Company’s production space at Winecream Production Space at 208 South Pulaski St, Baltimore, Md., from 1-2:00 p.m. Where they hand craft Winecream from start to finish. You’ll hang out in the loft-type space where they ferment and age their distinctive fruit wines. You’ll also have the opportunity to purchase scoops to enjoy in the historic urban space, as well as pints to bring home. Tickets are $15.00.*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***Sun., July 21Music and Arts FestivalThe Carribean is being brought to you and your family for absolutely free at the Veterans Plaza located at 1 Veterans Place Silver Spring, Md., beginning at 12 p.m. for more information on vendors, parking, etc., visit carifesta.com*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***Wed., July 24Baltimore Job Fair Open the doors of opportunity when you meet and interview with the top hiring companies in Baltimore. This career fair will allow you to learn about the businesses that are hiring and what their hiring needs are. Visit this free job hiring event at the DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Baltimore North at 1726 Reisterstown Rd, Parkville, Md. doors open at 11 a.m.*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***Networking and Resources BreakfastFor business leaders, entrepreneurs, business owners and new, prospective and existing chamber members. Admission is free but there is an additional cost for breakfast. You are invited to join us for a 1-hour meeting and networking session. We will discuss member benefits, upcoming events and share connections to local resources. Come out and networking at Miss Shirley’s Cafe located at 513 West Cold Spring Lane, Baltimore, Md. from 9-10:00 a.m.*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***Thurs., July 252019-2020 School Year Job FairALIGNSTAFFING Education Job Fair  will be held from 9 a.m.- 3:00 p.m. Certified Teachers must be licensed in DC or MD they also welcome uncertified teachers as well.*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***Sat., July 27 Family Fun DayThe League for People with Disabilities will host a FREE Family Fun Day and Art Festival from 11a.m.-3p.m. at 1111 E. Cold Spring Lane. Baltimore, Md.*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***The Receivership ProcessThe receivership process is a free event open to the public for a better understanding of the process of acquiring privately owned and abandoned properties through receivership. Register and learn how to purchase property at auctions from 6-7 p.m. at the Zeta Center 4501 Reisterstown Rd., Baltimore, Md.*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***Evening of Live Gospel MusicNatalie has an online ministry, called Hearts To The Sky Ministry which caters to the healing and deliverance of others who are suffering from illnesses, addictions and mental oppression. Come out and clear your mind at the Hotel RL located at the Baltimore Inner Harbor. 207 East Redwood Street Baltimore, Md. from 7- 10:00 p.m.*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***Coding Day for BeginnersThis event is for coding beginners and is free instructors will guide you through the 3-key building blocks of the modern web: HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Located at 1400 G Street Northwest, Washington, D.C.last_img read more

Google Is Launching a Tool That Will Tell You if Solar Panels

first_imgAugust 18, 2015 This story originally appeared on Engadget Adding solar panels to your roof can be frustrating, since it’s often difficult to know if your home receives enough light to justify the investment. Google Maps, however, has satellite, navigation and sunlight data for every property in the world, so it’s ideally placed to tell you how many rays hit your crib on a daily basis. That’s why the firm is launching Sunroof, a database of how much solar energy hits each building in a city, helping people work out if it’s worth the effort. Sunroof is intended as a “treasure map” for future green energy projects, telling you how much of a saving you’d make and how long it’d take to make back your initial outlay.To begin with, Project Sunroof will only be available in three locations: Boston, San Francisco and Fresno. If it turns out to be successful, however, then Google will roll the service out to the rest of the country and, possibly, the world. Once you’ve put in your address, you’ll be told how much you’re likely to save in energy costs, and then be put in touch with a local installer.We tested the service out on Aol’s building in San Francisco, and it told us that we received 1,840 hours of usable sunlight per year. In addition, we learned that we have roughly 15,641 square feet of available space that we could use to install solar panels. It then took us through our options, letting us know that we’d save $14,000 if we leased the hardware, or $24,000 if we bought them outright. So, if you’re in one of these three areas, why not share how much Google thinks you’re likely to save and if that’ll prompt you into signing up. Hear from business owners and CEOs who went through a crippling business problem and came out the other side bigger and stronger. Problem Solvers with Jason Feifer Listen Now 2 min readlast_img read more