Would be robbers subdued by store owner and employee

first_img Related Items:#magneticmedianews, #robberssubduedinstore Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, October 2, 2017 – Nassau – Often it is not advised, but this time it turned out alright for a store owner who managed to subdue not one, but two would be robbers.   The men entered the store on East Street wielding a knife and demanding cash.  The convenience store owner and an employee jumped the men, held them and Police were called in.  An arrest of the pair was made.#magneticmedianews#robberssubduedinstore Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img

Janelle Monáe Drops Two New Singles Announces New Album

first_imgNETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO Jan 28, 2018 – 10:52 pm Janelle Monaé’s “Time’s Up” Speech News Janelle Monáe Drops Two New Singles, Announces New Album Email Twitter Janelle Monáe Drops Singles From ‘Dirty Computer’ janelle-mon%C3%A1e-drops-two-new-singles-announces-new-albumcenter_img While Monáe has stayed busy over the past five years with music and acting, Dirty Computer is her first full-length album since 2013’s The Electric Lady. If these first two singles are any indication, Monáe will continue to make her statement loud and proud well into 2018 and beyond.Catching Up On Music News Powered By The Recording Academy Just Got Easier. Have A Google Home Device? “Talk To GRAMMYs”Read more Continuing her year of compelling statements, in “Django Jane” Monáe takes on issues of sexism and racism head-on, reading a rap-heavy riot act at power symbols while situated on a royal throne and at the head of the table. Just as visually striking, “Make Me Feel” presents a more sultry, seductive vibe, showing off Monáe’s acting chops overtop a funky, melodic dance club banger. Facebook The GRAMMY-nominated artist returns with not one, but two bold new songs and striking videos, plus a release date for her new full-length LPNate HertweckGRAMMYs Feb 22, 2018 – 3:34 pm Less than one month after her unforgettable and empowering “Time’s Up” speech at the 60th GRAMMY Awards, Janelle Monáe released two new songs on Feb. 22, complete with accompanying videos, and announced the release date for her upcoming fourth album, Dirty Computer, out April 27.last_img read more

OBITUARY Virginia J Lambert Morse 85

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Virginia J. (Lambert) Morse passed away at the Care One Nursing Center in Wilmington, Sunday April 14th. The beloved wife of George A. Morse Sr., she was eighty five years old.Born in Boston, she was the daughter of Joseph and Virginia (Lambert) Ferranti. Raised and educated in Burlington, Virginia graduated from Burlington High School along with the Class of 1951.In 1952 she married George Morse, whom she was introduced too by her grandmother. They lived in Woburn briefly and then bought their home in Wilmington, where they remained. Seven children blessed their family and this certainly kept Virginia extra busy. On their land they had horses, which every one of the children learned to ride and care for, growing up.When the children were all in school Virginia would often work for a catering company or other little odd jobs, just to get out of the house for a bit!As the years went by she became the proud “Nana” of seventeen grandchildren and thirteen great grand children! She was also very proud of each and so enjoyed being surrounded by her family, particularly at the holidays.A rather quiet woman  Virginia enjoyed listening to country music, reading a good book of any genre and doing all sorts of wonderful crafts that she made for her family and friends.Virginia was a very kind, thoughtful and caring woman. Her family was her world and she enjoyed them all, right up until the end.Sadly Virginia was predeceased by her husband George, and brother Ronald and sister in law Jean LambertVirginia is lovingly survived by her children, George A. Jr. of Kingston, NH, Dennis P. and his wife Marcy of Wilmington, Michael J. his wife Denise of Tewksbury, Donald B. his wife Susan of Wilmington, Susan V. Morse, her companion Richard Valentin of NH, Colleen M. Morse, her companion James Zechello of Easton, and Stacey M Silverhus, her husband David of Derry, NH. Loving sister of the late Ronald Lambert, his wife Jean. Loving “Nana” of 17 grandchildren and “Great- Nana” of 14 great-grandchildren.A Prayer Service was held in the Lynch-Cantillon Funeral Home, 263 Main Street, Woburn on Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. Interment is private. Relatives and friends were respectfully invited to Calling Hours, Wednesday evening 3-7 p.m. prior to the service. In honor of Virginia, remembrances may be made to the National Dementia Organization, 1100 W Norway Ave, #108, Mitchel, SD 57301.Virginia J. Morse(NOTE: The above obituary is from Lynch-Cantillon Funeral Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: Verda J. Murray, 90In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Elizabeth J. “Betty” (Kilpatrick) Valente, 75In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Janet (Colucci) O’Connor, 86In “Obituaries”last_img read more

Model Ekta Maru wants to follow Deepika Padukones footsteps into filmdom Hot

first_imgModel Ekta MaruInstagramModel Ekta Maru is one of the popular Instagram influencers in India. She has been a part of the fashion industry for some time now and has done some notable work. She is gorgeous, stunning and very talented and has decided to take the plunge into Bollywood.Ekta Maru aspires to be an actress and is all geared up to be a part of some interesting projects. The pretty lady has been vocal about her admiration for actress Deepika Padukone, who started her career with modelling before venturing into Bollywood films.In a statement, Ekta Maru said, “I am really looking forward to doing some good films. I want to make sure the roles I take up have an impact and are not usual ones. I am quite excited about doing films and working with amazing directors.” Model Ekta Maru.PR HandoutEkta loves facing the camera and enjoys it. She feels it is essential for one to be confident and represent their best skill. She is keen on working with phenomenal filmmakers in Bollywood.Considering her popularity, it would definitely be a cherry on the cake for her followers and admirers to see her in films. Model Ekta Maru.PR Handoutlast_img read more

Researchers use Facebook to dispel notion that social contagion is like biological

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A comparison of how people who received invitations to join Facebook from four groups of friends responded. Connections between the groups are shown in the squares at the bottom of each column. The less connected those four groups were,the more likely they were to join. These are averages over millions of invitations. Credit: Provided/Kleinberg et al More information: Structural diversity in social contagion, PNAS, Published online before print April 2, 2012, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1116502109AbstractThe concept of contagion has steadily expanded from its original grounding in epidemic disease to describe a vast array of processes that spread across networks, notably social phenomena such as fads, political opinions, the adoption of new technologies, and financial decisions. Traditional models of social contagion have been based on physical analogies with biological contagion, in which the probability that an individual is affected by the contagion grows monotonically with the size of his or her “contact neighborhood”—the number of affected individuals with whom he or she is in contact. Whereas this contact neighborhood hypothesis has formed the underpinning of essentially all current models, it has been challenging to evaluate it due to the difficulty in obtaining detailed data on individual network neighborhoods during the course of a large-scale contagion process. Here we study this question by analyzing the growth of Facebook, a rare example of a social process with genuinely global adoption. We find that the probability of contagion is tightly controlled by the number of connected components in an individual’s contact neighborhood, rather than by the actual size of the neighborhood. Surprisingly, once this “structural diversity” is controlled for, the size of the contact neighborhood is in fact generally a negative predictor of contagion. More broadly, our analysis shows how data at the size and resolution of the Facebook network make possible the identification of subtle structural signals that go undetected at smaller scales yet hold pivotal predictive roles for the outcomes of social processes.Press release (PhysOrg.com) — Historically, diseases tend to spread most quickly when introduced into a crowded environment. The more neighbors there are, the more easily viruses can hop from person to person. More recently, the same sort of language has been used to describe how social ideas and adoption spreads. Facebook for example, has been described as spreading like a disease. Now however, researchers from Cornell University have shown that users adopting Facebook, tend to do so more predictably when receiving invitations from multiple sources, rather than a lot of requests from members of the same group, which implies that Facebook and its growth, does not actually compare with biological contagion at all. They have published their results in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences © 2012 PhysOrg.com Citation: Researchers use Facebook to dispel notion that social contagion is like biological contagion (2012, April 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-04-facebook-dispel-notion-social-contagion.htmlcenter_img The research team started out as just Johan Kleinberg and Jon Ugander, researchers at Cornell, but soon grew to four as Lars Backstrom and Cameron Marlow, sociologists working for Facebook signed on. Together the team was able to study actual Facebook data. Specifically, they looked at what happens when a user first joins Facebook; their email contact list is examined and Facebook then offers to send an invitation to everyone on that list who is not already a Facebook member. Facebook also offers to send an invitation to “friend” other Facebook users who have the new user already listed in their contact list. In watching and analyzing the circumstances under which users respond to such requests the researchers found patterns emerging. The most striking of which was the fact that users are more likely to accept such requests if they come from people who reside in social different groups, than if they all came from the same one. An example would be, if a person receives invitations to join Facebook from people they work with, some friends, as well as some from people in their Book of the Month club, they are more likely to join than if they simply receive a bunch of invitations from their regular group of friends. They also found that upon accepting the invites, those that do so as a result of getting invites from a more diverse group tend to spend more time on Facebook, indicating perhaps, that a more diverse group of “friends” is ultimately more interesting.Besides providing practical information for marketers, the results of the teams research help dispel the notion that social acceptance of new ideas or people spreads in much the same way as diseases do through human populations. The team says that a users, rather than responding to requests to join Facebook from a bunch of friends from their normal social clique, tend to be more likely to accept requests to join if they come from a more divergent group, or in other words, people from different groups, even if they don’t know a lot of the people in those other groups. Explore further A Facebook “Neighborhood.” This member has two large, closely interconnected clumps of friends, and a few smaller clumps. Each clump probably represents a different social context — people from work, people from a hobby, and so on. Cornell research shows that many requests from one context are less effective in influencing decisions than requests coming from many directions. Credit: Provided/Kleinberg et al Facebook launches mobile messaging applast_img read more